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To illustrate the question in a simple and efficient manner, consider two scenarios: You install your favourite linux distribution on entire disk i.e. without any partitions: Suppose your system is crashed because operating system is unable to access some sectors and unable to boot. You lost some chunk of data due to bad sectors and because of that you ...


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As the man page states, it's game over. Removing the last passphrase makes the LUKS container permanently inaccessible. That is, if you really removed the last key. Does cryptsetup luksDump show DISABLED for all key slots? Normally cryptsetup prevents you from doing that, or at least asks for confirmation: # cryptsetup luksRemoveKey foobar Enter ...


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Lack of partitions is a common cause for needing recovery in the first place. A partition table is the most common / standard way to declare that the disk is in use (and thanks to various partition types, it usually also declares what exactly each partition is used for). An unpartitioned disk looks like an unused disk to many programs; installers select ...


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ATA comprises PATA and SATA, so it is correct that you have an ATA disk but more specific to say SATA. The distinction is really only important on the hardware side though. You see SCSI because that is the subsystem that provides IO for these disks.


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This was true once - once upon a time drives were smaller (and slower), as were tapes. If you have a large raid group, and suffer a (compound) fault - all data on that raid group must be recovered. As sizes increase, so too do the numbers of tapes required. So a large filesystem, where you're doing a full restore might mean recovering everything and ...


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From the cryptsetup manual: Removing the last passphrase makes the LUKS container permanently inaccessible. That's an inherent property of the design of LUKS. Each key slot contains the actual encryption key, wrapped by a key derived from the passphrase. If there is no slot left containing a wrapped key, then there is no copy of the key anymore. I'm ...


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It seems I found this thread too late, but for future readers of this thread: When doing data rescue, your first step should be to do a full image of the drive with dd or something similar (cloneZilla is a popular choice). In other words, get an imprint of the drive as-is so that you do no further damage to the volume whilst trying to rescue the data.



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