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12

Use ddrescue, which is designed for this type of scenario. It uses a log file to keep track of the parts of the data that it has successfully copied - or otherwise. As a result you can stop and restart it as many times as necessary, provided that the log file is maintained. See Ddrescue - Data recovery tool


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Use dd. It can do a lot, but you need the following form: dd if=<source> of=<destination> bs=<block size> count=<blocks> skip=<offset> E.g., to copy the 2nd to the 4th kilobyte from a file, you'd do: dd if=in.dat of=out.dat bs=1K count=2 skip=2 Given the specifics of what you're trying to do, you can also try to add ...


3

In smartctl -a look for Self-test execution status. Example when no test is running: Self-test execution status: ( 0) The previous self-test routine completed without error or no self-test has ever been run. Example while a test is running: Self-test execution status: ...


2

Volume group name should be unique on system, by design. Problem occurs when a disk is moved from a system to another. So you have few options (detailed below) rename the VG on the external [not mounted] disk(s). rename the VG of your system (not realistic) merge both volume group into a single one (probably needs to rename first) option 1 - rename the ...


2

Here are the relevant excerpts for the same question which have been answered already at How do I choose the right parameters when using badblocks? and Using badblocks on modern disks. There is a badblocks benchmark script available that should suit your purpose. With regards to the -b option: this depends on your disk. Modern, large disks have 4KB blocks, ...


2

If you partition the drive /dev/sda you will get as result two partitions, not drives /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 To partition it now you will need a lot of details. Will be better to back your data and start with new installation. And in the process of install select manual disk partitioning and split the disk


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You can easily partition it into /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 with fdisk, parted, gparted, or another partitioning tool (if you're working from a live CD) or via Anaconda (if you're in the Anaconda installer).


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You don't want RHEL to notice it, or you simply don't want it to mount it automatically? For the latter, it's simple: you modify /etc/fstab. Your new drive will have new UUIDs, which you can determine by running blkid which will output all your partitions and UUIDs. In /etc/fstab, comment-out lines that refer to the physical disk and replace them with UUID ...


1

You still need to format the logical volume with some kind of filesystem. LVM just gets you to the point where you have one resizable volume instead of two fixed size volumes. Example: # mkfs.ext4 /dev/vol_grp1/logical_vol1 After that, try your mount command again.


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rsync -avz /dev/sda1 user@ip:/backup/ would attempt to copy the device node, not the disk content. You can make an image of the partition as a remote file: ssh -C user@ip:/backup/sda1.img </dev/sda1 This makes an image of the partition. It won't give you access to your files. In order to access your files, you need to mount the partition or the image: ...


1

You can do dd if=/dev/sda of=back.sda bs=10M You can increase or reduce the bs(block size) based on your i/o capacity(fast increase,slow decrease),then copy the back.sda with scp or rsync on backup. Later you can mount the image and recovery the files,this will work if sda is not broken disk,if is corrupted you can try a fsck. Rsync works for files,i ...


1

Compressibility of a disk image depends a lot on what kind of data is stored in there, how much of it is used or has ever been used (without being explicitely erased during the whole life of that drive). In short, it's impossible to tell. 77% is completely plausible as are 0% (a disk full of videos/oggs) and 99% (an empty, recently erased with zeros disk). ...


1

you are quite lucky, because the second partition is a logical volume manager lvm partition for which it is easier to reduce, extend, add and delete logical partitions as described here. Basically you have to follow the steps described in the answer here, which does extend the logical volume. Instead of extending you would shrink/reduce it. Checkout the ...


1

A disk read request might not always occur because a cache hit may occur and so the file can be read from cache without a disk read request. Correct and complete. If this does not happen disk accesses will occur. One to get the file's name, another to get the path of the file and the final one to read the first character from the file This one is ...


1

Most obvious would be a deep search for partitions via testdisk. See their general guide on how to run it and/or the step-by-step documentation Then compare the partition table that testdisk found with what you see currently, without changing anything, and maybe post it here. Another option, at least for ext2/3/4 would be using debugfs command but this is ...


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Thanks for this thread, people :) I've just used a modified version on a virtual Linux Mint box to clone a physical hard drive on an ageing RedHat server. I ran the following as root on the virtual box: ssh root@192.168.1.5 "dd if=/dev/cciss/c0d0" | dd of=/dev/sdb 192.168.1.5 is the physical Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1 box. /dev/sdb is a new virtual ...



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