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15

SCSI and ATA are entirely different standards. They are currently both developed under the aegis of the INCITS standards organization but by different groups. SCSI is under technical committee T10, while ATA is under T13.1 ATA was designed with hard disk drives in mind, only. SCSI is a broader standard, capable of controlling mass storage devices, tape ...


4

If you do not have backups, your data wasn't important. It's gone. There is no undo. Especially not with encryption involved. something that produces output > /dev/somedisk overwrites data on the device. Whatever is overwritten can not be restored, so your only chance would be if you noticed and cancelled it right away. Then probably only the first few ...


4

I don't know what you are trying to achieve so I can only describe what your command is actually doing. dd if=/dev/zero You are reading from a special device which returns an infinite number of zero (or NUL) bytes. of=/EMPTY You are creating a new file using the above (infinite) input. bs=1M You read and write the infinite data stream in megabyte ...


3

I know you should use No-op for Solid Sate Drives or SSD s for sure. Not necessarily. I don't know why people keep treating SSD's as some kind of special case where you don't need the benefits of other schedulers. Having rotating disks just means it's more important to have requests merged. Merging requests is just one thing that the scheduler does. ...


2

Getting statistics about ongoing dd process You can use the kill command with the appropriate signal to make dd output statistics to standard error. From the GNU dd man page: Sending a USR1 signal to a running 'dd' process makes it print I/O statistics to standard error and then resume copying. $ dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/null& pid=$! $ kill ...


1

smartmon-tools may be useful in detection hard failures by the drive. However, the output is difficult to interpret. On the whole, I tend to agree with @Patrick that it there are more likely causes. But hard-drives do fail. If they are slowly degrading (instead of catastrophic failure like head crashes) the drive controller may use bad sector replacement ...


1

Hard drives usually don't have labels, it's filesystems that do. Here are the main places where a filesystem label is likely to come up: In /etc/fstab. In your bootloader configuration (e.g. /boot/grub/grub.cfg). If your Grub configuration is automatically generated, run update-grub after changing your labels and verify that the result is what you wanted. ...


1

As far as I know, labels aren't that much used in the unix world, so there isn't any danger in changing them. Keep using the UUIDs and you should be fine.


1

No way to recover, as simple as that. As a side note, doing dd is not a perfect way to backup files. For future cases, consider using tools like dar - you want some compression, incremental backup would also allow you to save huge amount of time and disk space in most cases.


1

dd was useful in the old days when people used tapes (when block sizes mattered) and when simpler tools such as cat might not be binary-safe. Nowadays, dd if=/dev/sdb of=/dev/sdc is a just complicated, error-prone, slow way of writing cat /dev/sdb >/dev/sdc. While dd still useful for some relatively rare tasks, it is a lot less useful than the number of ...


1

I have no idea about ZFS but if your intention is to zero out the file system then rather dd I will suggest shred I'm not answering about why dd is in infinite loop but your end-target is solved


1

Disable the drive cache and try re-formatting again. The system is getting ahead of the hardware.


1

The cause is hdparm, there is a bug in there that spins down the HDD in 3-5 sec when idle. This has been known in hdparm since 2012 and reported fixed. Now it causes the same problems in Debian Wheezy (for me it was Debian 7.6 and not before that initial upgrade to 7.6). Solution: check what level you power management is on (Advanced power management ...



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