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For some file systems like ext4 or btrfs on Linux, you can use filefrag to get the offsets of the data segments for the file on the block device the file system is on. $ seq 1000 > a $ filefrag -v a Filesystem type is: ef53 File size of a is 3893 (1 block of 4096 bytes) ext: logical_offset: physical_offset: length: expected: flags: 0: ...


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In linux there are many tools for that, try for example lsblk or fdisk -l or parted -l. Example $ lsblk | head -8 | expand | column -t NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 238.5G 0 disk ├─sda1 8:1 0 200M 0 part /boot/efi ├─sda2 8:2 0 500M 0 part /boot └─sda3 ...


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That's what smartctl -H does: it gives you a pass (no failure predicted) or fail (failure predicted in next 24h). SMART unfortunately doesn't give any way to ask a drive its expected remaining lifespan, other than that. Other than SSDs with their limited write durability, it probably isn't even possible to do in general. You can get less output from ...


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If you want to know the size of a device (in bytes) you may use blockdev: # blockdev --getsize64 /dev/sde 2000398934016 In this example /dev/sde is a 2TB disk, or at least, that's what the kernel sees. Naturally, fdisk, parted and others should show the same information. This size does not change. Losing capacity due to bad sectors is not an option, it ...


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This is going to be tricky to fix by hand. I hope you haven't modified any more data on this disk, apart from the broken partition table you wrote to it. Using sfdisk, fdisk, etc to create a backup of the partition table is a good idea (when you don't accidentally type the wrong command :) ). But for extra insurance I like to back up the boot sectors of my ...


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Any adjusting that the 2 HDD's will perform over time will be to keep their usable space, that's not corrupted or damaged, at the same byte counts. All this happens at a lower level to you, the user of the HDD, so I'd would expect that both HDDs would report identical capacities over time. NOTE: All modern HDDs include a extra reserve of space that they can ...


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This can be done without problems, assuming you're talking about RAID1. Create the RAID1 with e.g mdadm --create --level 1 -n 2 /dev/mdX /dev/sdaX --write-mostly /dev/sdbX The --write-mostly tells mdadm that the following devices are slower to access and hence mostly only to be written to (or put another way: mostly read from the other device(s) which is ...


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Letting badblocks write the pattern in the first place should be no slower than writing it any other way. Especially if you use the -b block-size and -c blocks-at-once options so it doesn't do small reads/writes. This example overwrites the disk with "random" pattern in 1MiB blocks: badblocks -v -w -t random -b 4096 -c 256 /dev/thedisk If there is a ...


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I think that this 'Toshisba' icon represents graphically a whole drive as a device just like /dev/sda. Device cannot be mounted this way. Only partition formatted with filesystem which is represented in your case as 'File System' icon. I suggest to ignore it or maybe there is some setting in a filemanager to hide it.


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You seem to have mounted the wrong partition of the server drive. Unmount it manually (umount /run/media/root/ea53d717-....) and then check how the server drive is partitioned (fdisk,sfdisk, cfdisk, whatever). Then remount the correct partition you just found using mount /drive/partition /media/mountpoint.



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