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2

Zorin OS is meant to look a lot like windows (or mac if you choose) http://zorinos.com/


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There is a theme that makes Linux Mint look like Windows XP http://segfault.linuxmint.com/2015/08/cinnxp-makes-cinnamon-look-like-windows-xp/


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This might be too case-specific. I resolved it by manually upgrading my window manager, sddm. sudo apt-get install sddm It now works for me.


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Run through these basics, it's unclear what you mean by 'gui'. When you boot, you see grub, I assume. You hit enter, and the boot process starts. When you say 'splash screen', do you mean what you see right after you start the boot from grub process? Does the disk chatter for a while? Guess 1 This is unlikely, but because it's what most people with this ...


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Yes, using SSH X11-Redirection. man ssh has this to say about it: -X Enables X11 forwarding. This can also be specified on a per-host basis in a configuration file. X11 forwarding should be enabled with caution. Users with the ability to bypass file permissions on the remote host (for the user's X authorization database) can access ...


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The application normally has to support it. You'll find some applications can bind to an IP address or hostname instead (if it has that setting), and then it'll magically go through the interface where the IP is configured. Example, I use irssi. In my configuration, I have a line like this. hostname = "temple.example.net" When it starts, it finds the IP ...


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tl;dr: GitEye = most intuitive UI, fastest workflow, highly customizable I'm a long time TortoiseHg Workbench poweruser and I love it, so naturally my completely opinionated criteria were mostly based on it: * full history visible in main window * beautiful tree (DAG), branches CLEARLY separated * current branch clearly visible in history * superclear ...


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tl;dr: GitEye = most intuitive UI, fastest workflow, highly customizable I'm a long time TortoiseHg Workbench poweruser and I love it, so naturally my completely opinionated criteria were mostly based on it: * full history visible in main window * beautiful tree (DAG), branches CLEARLY separated * current branch clearly visible in history * superclear ...


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On a technical level, there's no way to tell that the string a program is requesting will be used as a password. On the other hand, there are kdesu and gksudo which are, to a first approximation, "sudo but with a popup window for the password".


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You can use arandr, a GUI front end for xrandr. This also is capable of rotating the screen. It is in the Debian repositories. Arandr's web page also mentions alternative GUI tools, no idea how up to date that is.


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First, you need to find out how the screen that you want to rotate is labeled.: xrandr -q Output should be something like: Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 1366 x 768, maximum 8192 x 8192 LVDS1 connected 1366x768+0+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 344mm x 194mm 1366x768 60.1*+ 1360x768 59.8 60.0 1024x768 60.0 800x600 60.3 56.2 640x480 ...


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The good tool for this job is xrandr. First determine your display with something like $ xrandr --verbose | awk '/ connected/{print $1}' LVDS1 Now you are ready to play with it xrandr --output LVDS1 --rotate left xrandr --output LVDS1 --rotate inverted xrandr --output LVDS1 --reflect x xrandr --output LVDS1 --reflect xy and when you mess your screen ...



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