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pacman -S os-prober grub-install /dev/sdX (do not use partition number) grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg And then you should be all set to go, as long as os-prober is installed, it will let grub detect and preserve the windows boot partition. Note this is NOT for EFI motherboards.


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The question resolved itself: If GRUB attempts to chainload a file that is not accepted by Secure Boot (if Secure Boot is activated), it will get an Access Denied error.


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Suppose you want Mint on /dev/sda, and Ubuntu on /dev/sdb. Only one OS needs the grub installer, preferably Mint on the boot disk. After you install Ubuntu, rerun sudo update-grub on Mint, and grub will detect and make menu entries for both OSes. But even if you installed Mint, then Ubuntu, and used the grub installer on both, it should still work OK.


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UUIDs solved my problem, which was the same as your problem. The following excerpt from the Arch Wiki is very helpful: If your machine has more than one SATA, SCSI or IDE disk controller, the order in which their corresponding device nodes are added is arbitrary. This may result in device names like /dev/sda and /dev/sdb switching around on each boot, ...


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Yes, and here's a short example taken from Rod Smith's great page on GRUB 2/EFI Boot Loading To chainload another EFI boot loader, one uses GRUB2 chainloader The following grub2 menuentry example will run an EFI bootloader menuentry "Windows 7" { insmod part_gpt insmod chain set root='(hd0,gpt1)' chainloader ...


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Fixing grub.cfg by hand (not recommended) Looking at your grub.cfg the Ubuntu entry is broken (and some of the following one as well) menuentry 'Ubuntu' --class ubuntu --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os $menuentry_id_option 'gnulinux-simple-eee18451-b607-4875-8a88-c9cb6c6544c8' { recordfail load_video gfxmode $linux_gfx_mode insmod ...


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Just for the record Elementary OS != Debian, it might be similar in some ways, but it's unlikely that they only changed the name. Look at your grub configuration, typically found in /etc/grub or /etc/grub.d, it's probably just a matter of changing the order of things in it. On my machine (that runs Debian exclusively, so I can't test, but if elemtary OS ...



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