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sudo fdisk /dev/sda Command (m for help): m Command action a toggle a bootable flag b edit bsd disklabel c toggle the DOS compatibility flag d delete a partition l list known partition types m print this menu n add a new partition o create a new empty DOS partition table p print the partition table q quit ...


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is there a possibility that I can change it to sda2 fdisk utility itself has an option to toggle the boot partition. fdisk /dev/sda type 'a' to toggle the bootable flag


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If you need simple, easy to set up bootloader, then I recommend LILO. It is less capable than GRUB2, but on home desktop PC it doesn't really matter.


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Check the /boot/grub/grub.cfg file to see if the changes are being passed when running 'sudo update-grub'. The 'sudo update-grub' command is suppose to update /boot/grub/grub.cfg from /etc/default/grub and /etc/grub.d when ran. If it is not then you can temporarily edit /boot/grub/grub.cfg to make it work, but it might be over written when the kernel is ...


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The System Setup is just a second name of BIOS setup. When you are in BIOS you see words in the title in there 'BIOS Setup UtilityorCMOS setup utilty` so it is all the same - BIOS, and it doesn't mean an installation of any OS. If you don't like names in GRUB menu you can change them, you would need to operate via /etc/grub.d/40_custom and update-grub which ...


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As far as I'm aware, from my own experiences, yes it is normal for Grub to chain link to the Windows Boot Manager. Basically, it is the boot-loader that starts Windows, like Grub is the boot-loader that starts Ubuntu. The reason it is listed like that is because rather than starting Windows by itself, it chains itself to the Windows boot-loader so it'll do ...


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It is pretty simple , first you have to locate the grub.cfg file, in Ubuntu it will be under /boot/grub/grub.cfg, make sure you take a back up of this file before editing. Open the file with any text editor of your choice in sudo mode, eg sudo vi path/grug.cfg In this file there will be menu entries , which represents each item in the boot menu. Find the ...


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If the order of your boot menu is important (and not just that Windows boots by default), and you don't have anything bootable besides Linux Mint and Windows (like OSX, BSD) you can do: cd /etc/grub.d mv 30_os-prober 09_os-prober as the alphabetical order of the files in /etc/grub.d, determines in what order they are processed. Then you run sudo ...


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You can follow the steps given in Linux Mint itself. Linux Mint tutorials.


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I've just had to deal with this on a laptop running Debian Testing (Jessie/Sid). Possibly relevant: swap partition on an LVM volume (non-encrypted) at /dev/vg1/swap. To make the system resume after hibernation, I had to edit /etc/default/grub and change GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="" to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="resume=/dev/mapper/vg1-swap" and then run ...


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Boot from your Windows DVD. If you bought Windows separately from your computer, then this is the DVD you bought. If Windows was preinstalled on your computer, then the DVD most likely came in the box. If it did not, contact your manufacturer to see if they will give you one. Once you have booted the DVD, find the option that says something like "repair ...



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