Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I finally found the best method for me to start Kali without reinstalling Grub to my HDD. For this i used unetbootin and SuperGrub(Download here) First install unetbootin: sudo apt-get install unetbootin Then rename the supergrub .iso to .img (using .iso gave me booterrors) and start unetbootin. In unetbootin select the floppy method and load the ...


0

The steps I was doing were right at all. The problem was the way I was booting my system. BIOS found CentOS media, then installation menu has been shown to me. I was trying to boot choosing option "boot from hard drive" and after that I have received the error described before. I repeated the steps again, but from this time I ejected CentOS' media before ...


0

I solved this by installing grub manually from another linux. After installing Debian on the USB drive, mount it to /mnt and then use the command sudo grub-install /dev/sdb --force --boot-directory=/mnt assuming that the device of the USB drive name is /dev/sdb (DON'T SUFFIX THIS WITH NUMBERS SUCH AS sdb1). You can know the device name using fdisk -l (run ...


0

Screw grub. It's probably some complexity it introduces that leads you to believe this is a difficult problem to solve. If your computer is less than 5 years old or so, then you're probably booting from a UEFI firmware, in which case your Debian-built linux kernel is already a bootloader. Partition the disk: printf %c\\n o y n 1 '' '' ef00 w y | gdisk ...


1

For starters, you could partition and format and mount the USB stick copy all files from your old /boot to the USB stick change your /etc/fstab to make the USB stick filesystem the new /boot umount /boot, mount /boot to make it official install a bootloader on the stick (grub-install /dev/sdx or whatever) reboot and see if it works As for reclaiming the ...


0

It's easiest for you if you install them to Ubuntu's partition to /boot. GRUB will work and boot Ubuntu for you even if you install them to Android partition but you'll lose little bit on Ubuntu's scripts. Another solution is to keep kernel and initrd in Android's /boot and symlink Android's /boot to Ubuntu's /boot. Both work. In general, kernel and initrd ...


0

Seeing as you want a fresh install, preserving no data, just start the installation again and make sure there are no more forced shutdowns. It looks like GRUB hasn't been written correctly to your drive, so rather than trying to resolve the GRUB issue, just start over.


0

In a VPS you do not usually install GRUB. GRUB loads the kernel (among other things). If you have an OpenVZ or similar environment, you do not load the kernel. The kernel is shared between containers. You also do not update the kernel -- and it will, in fact be write-protected from your updates. In a VPS which is based on KVM this is a different matter. ...


0

Especially if you've got an EFI BIOS, the BIOS boot menu may let you boot straight into Windows, bypassing GRUB. Give it a try. The key to hit is BIOS-specific, ESC, F11, and F12 are all reasonably common. There may be a prompt telling you—but it could flash by pretty quick. Does the page down button work? Or end? Then you could get to the bottom of the ...


0

Supposing that during the installation of Centos 7, you installed Grub 2 on the MBR of /dev/sdd, you will have to enter BIOS and then you will chose your Hard Disk Drive that corresponds to /dev/sdd (like demonstrated here). Different grub versions will not be a problem, since you will only use one of them. :)


0

To add to the answer provided by @kirill-a : Here is what I did recently to restore the Grub boot menu on a Windows 8 / Debian 8 dual-boot machine, after the Windows 8 installation wiped the GRUB MBR and boot menu (legacy BIOS, not UEFI). REPAIR GRUB2: LiveCD 'chroot' method: # = root privilege needed, use su or sudo. Start with a bootable LiveCD of ...


1

jkt123's will work for most distributions I guess. However for Arch Linux it didn't work, at least not with the packages I have available. The indices you can set with grub-set-default only correspond to the main menu entries. The kernel options are however in a submenu. So either you move the kernel entry out of the submenu into the main menu or you put ...


1

As mentioned in the comments, you can set the default kernel to boot into using the grub-set-default X command, where X is the number of the kernel you want to boot into. In some distributions you can also set this number by editing the /etc/default/grub file and setting GRUB_DEFAULT=X, and then running update-grub. The number is the index to an array of ...



Top 50 recent answers are included