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Well, you certainly went out of your way to not do yourself any favors. All of the config files were on your Ubuntu partition. One temp way is to do the following at the grub propt: set root='(hd0,1)' chainloader +1 That should get you back to Windows. At that point you should be able to restore the Windows Bootloader through the command line. ...


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I have done some more reading and I have found the way to update my grub.conf in a different directory. I have not checked if this will now allow it to update automatically in the future, but at least I have a working solution. My problem was GRUB2 was using /boot/efi/grub/grub.cfg and running the script update-grub was only updating ...


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From scratch: Install grub2 on a usb Extract Android x86 Iso content somewhere on usb create the following grub.cfg entry I suppose you have extracted the Android files in USB_ROOT/boot/iso/android menuentry "Android-x86 Live" { set root=(hd0,msdos1) linux /boot/iso/android/kernel root=/dev/ram0 androidboot.hardware=android_x86 video=-16 quiet ...


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Be careful, in your grub.conf, the root option should be your actual root partition, not the /boot/efi. So ensure the grub.conf contains the line root (hd0,8) as it was originally. As your BIOS let you choose CentOS, it means the /boot/efi partition was correctly mounted when you upgraded grub. So now, the only missing step is to tell your BIOS to boot ...


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Generally, I have found the PXE boot option only exists on a system BIOS boot selection menu. Once you get into grub it is basically too late. On Dell machines, it looks to be possible to program this action remotely (and programatically) depending on the hardware you have installed. Especially using the Dell iDRAC. This capability might be possible on ...


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instead of choosing automatic recovery, select an emergency shell, then try: $ e2fsck -fy /dev/sda1 $ e2fsck -fy /dev/sda3 $ e2fsck -fy /dev/sda7 This will check the filesystems, option -f forces the checking to continue even if the filesystem seems clean and option -y forces a 'yes' answer to any interactive questions. If you are happy to sit and watch ...


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I've mentioned the Solution here on Unix Stackexchange. Either try the grub-mkconfig method by booting into Linux through Super Grub 2 Disk that I also mentioned, OR, directly recover Windows Loader and recover Linux later when you need it. It's all mentioned in the Link.


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Grub2 has two parts -- one in the MBR and the other one on a regular partition. The rescue prompt means grub has failed to load its second part. To fix that, you need to reinstall grub from a real system. Either you can boot from live CD/USB (easy), or you can redirect the rescue terminal to load the other parts, if you know where from (not so easy). Check ...


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This seems to solved the error. I opened the file /etc/default/grub and found on line 11 GRUB _ CMDLINE _ LINUX _ DEFAULT="quiet splash acpiosi=linux Removing the spaces between _ to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash acpiosi=linux solved the problem


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Boot into recovery mode, hold shift after the BIOS loads. Select the second kernel with (recovery mode). If you still have the same problem, mouse/keyboard not responding then reboot and try again with the next available recovery mode kernal. I have once had to use the third option before it worked. Turn on networking network then fix the packages dpkg. ...



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