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1

jkt123's will work for most distributions I guess. However for Arch Linux it didn't work, at least not with the packages I have available. The indices you can set with grub-set-default only correspond to the main menu entries. The kernel options are however in a submenu. So either you move the kernel entry out of the submenu into the main menu or you put ...


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As mentioned in the comments, you can set the default kernel to boot into using the grub-set-default X command, where X is the number of the kernel you want to boot into. In some distributions you can also set this number by editing the /etc/default/grub file and setting GRUB_DEFAULT=X, and then running update-grub. The number is the index to an array of ...


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The root directory is just what it says: your root directory, i.e /. If you are running grub-install while booted from some other medium and have your normal root directory mounted somewhere other than /, then you want to specify this argument to point it to your root directory.


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I'm not too much of an expert about GRUB, but as far as I know, the root directory for GRUB it's the directory where you can install a working GRUB when you have started your system in recovery mode: grub-install –-root-directory=/test/kernelimage /dev/sda Here the root directory contains an image of the Linux kernel to boot, and must also contain a ...


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If you install Grub to a partition, nothing is modified outside that partition. In particular, the MBR (if the disk has classical DOS partitions) is not modified. If you do that, Linux can only be booted if the bootloader in the BIOS or UEFI knows where to look for it. The reason to install Grub on a partition is when you already have another bootloader in ...


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beadm can be found when Solaris 11 is booted. So first boot the (Solaris) operating system, login as user and then execute beadm. Some features are probably prohibited (like destroy) and only available as privileged user.


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You should use beadm for this. To list all the created boot environments use: beadm list To remove one: beadm destroy solaris-backup-1 These boot environments are created automatically when certain software is installed. See also man beadm and https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E23824_01/html/E21801/


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According to the Solaris 11 documentation you can edit the boot-loader configuration using bootadm. So first list all boot entries: $ bootadm list-menu The output in your case sould be something like: the location of the boot loader configuration files is: /rpool/boot/grub default 0 console graphics timeout 30 0 Oracle Solaris 11.2 1 solaris-backup-1 ...


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You could give a try to boot-repair-disk to have it repair your GRUB. It has worked very well for me in the past.


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while your system is turning on, press and hold shift until grub menu loads. check whether grub lists your windows partition, if it didn't show, try updating grub by using sudo update-grub if still it doesn't work, use boot-repair sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && ...


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First, try to run update-grub If that does not work - try: gksudo gedit /etc/default/grub should show something like: GRUB_DEFAULT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=true GRUB_TIMEOUT=10 You can change GRUB_TIMEOUT=10 to however long you want grub to showup. Then, save the file and run update-grub again


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Well, you certainly went out of your way to not do yourself any favors. All of the config files were on your Ubuntu partition. One temp way is to do the following at the grub propt: set root='(hd0,1)' chainloader +1 That should get you back to Windows. At that point you should be able to restore the Windows Bootloader through the command line. ...



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