Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

The way I found to solve it was by creating a separate partition to boot. then all the installation worked just find. In the grub installation all I did was. mount the boot partition in the directory boot. (that I previously create in /) so mount /dev/sda2 (/) in /mnt and the mount /dev/sda3 (/boot) in /mnt/boot pacstrap /mnt grub-bios genfstab -U -p ...


1

If you are in arch-chroot mode you should run grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg other than grub-mkconfig -o /mnt/boot/grub/grub.cfg Because: When you are installing arch linux for the first time, you mount your file system in /mnt and install base system from outside. Once you're done with base packages, you can arch-chroot inside /mnt and all the ...


0

I have solved my question, I have simply forget to add lvm2 in the HOOKS line now it looks like: HOOKS = "base udev autodetect modconf block keyboard keymap encrypt lvm2 filesystems fsck shutdown"


1

This should be doable. Once you've booted up your system using the Knoppix LiveCD you'll need to open a shell and then determine what the device ID is for the SSD device. You can use a command such as blkid or lsblk, assuming they're available on Knoppix. Once you've identified this, you can mount it: $ mount /dev/sda1 /mnt Once mounted you can ...


2

I assume you are trying to set a password to edit GRUB but you need to boot without being asked for password. I think in addittion to your current configuration you need to edit /etc/grub.d/10_linux and add the --unrestricted option. For a complete reference you can check this link in AskUbuntu I posted once, when I was stuck in the same situation. ...


0

Just boot to a live windows (no matter which version) using a hiren software, then just shutdown it. All new setting will be written in the disk and you can mount your disk created in windows easily.


0

just add "--unrestricted" to the "class" line in /etc/grub.d/10_linux as described here: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=840204#c53 then regenerate your grub config with "grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg" or whatever is appropriate for your install. if you already have your password setup prior to this you will now have the grub config you ...


0

Since grub is standard boot loader, you can use any distro that uses grub as its bootloader.


5

If the Ubuntu installation is still present (and only GRUB was lost), sure, you can use any distro that has live booting to do so. chroot into the Ubuntu installation and install and update Grub. If /dev/sda5 is the Ubuntu partition: mount /dev/sda5 /mnt mount -o bind /dev /mnt/dev mount -t proc none /mnt/proc mount -t sysfs none /mnt/sys mount -t devpts ...


1

Edit /etc/ld.so.conf, add /usr/local/lib. After that, ldconfig will re-sync your libraries and the grub-customizer will probably work. Your ldd command was badly parametrized. There must be a binary named grub-customizer in your path, it is probably in /usr/local/bin, although it isn't guaranteed. If it is so, the best if you call an ldd ...


2

After analyzing the scripts in Fedora, I realize that the configuration file path is read from the symlink /etc/grub2.conf. The correct grub2-mkconfig line is thus: grub2-mkconfig -o "$(readlink /etc/grub2.conf)"


3

Specific actions that need to happen when a RPM package is installed or removed are included within the RPM package itself in pre-install, post-install, pre-uninstall and post-uninstall sections. For every installed RPM package you can query the RPM database for the exact scripts that are included with the rpm command: rpm -q --scripts ...


2

It is possible, yes. You need to pass init=/bin/sh to the kernel and you need to remember that the rootfs is most probably mounted ro afterwards. To directly run your program you need to tell the kernel to invoke it after configuring the hardware, but note that the normal userspace won't be available to your program.



Top 50 recent answers are included