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Xubuntu's installer asks for installing grub at a certain point. You can skip this step, reboot your machine, boot Mint, update-grub. It should find Xubuntu and add it to Grub. Update grub again when you uninstall Xubuntu. P.S. If you touch(ex. resize) the Mint partition during Xubuntu install this might throw you to grub rescue. In that case, I recommend ...


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Reinstall input device drivers sudo apt-get install --reinstall xserver-xorg-input-all


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Since Elementary OS Luna is based on Ubuntu 12.04 I found that it's quite common problem to install 12.04 with EFI http://askubuntu.com/questions/260297/12-04-2-failed-to-install-grub-efi-to-target . Anyway, check that you followed steps from here https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UEFI


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I would suggest to check the MBR partition table, to see maybe you have a problem in the physical drive mapping. There are few websites and tools, where you can just paste the contents of your mbr, and they will analyze it for you. Also, make sure your USB is not bootable (run fdisk /dev/sdX, press p and check that no partition has the bootable flag on) To ...


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This is a classic case of stateless VDI. oVirt or RHEV both provide this functionality as well as a restricted user portal allowing the user to start a VM with the OS they need. When the VM starts, a snapshot is being taken. When the VM is stopped, the snapshot is discarded, and all VMs are back at golden image state


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LiveCDs usually have something like a "Root terminal" you can open to do things as the superuser. From there, you should be able to cd to where the filesystem is mounted and simply mv the relevant directories. For example, if the mount point is /mnt/fs, and you want to move the /mnt/fs/home/me/whatever/etc directory back: > cd /mnt/fs > mv ...


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If you're asking if you have multiple copies of the bootloader code, the answer is no. The boot loader installs its code at the start of the harddrive (the empty space between the partition table and the first partition), and will overwrite anything that was already there. Now, that is for MBR configurations. If you have UEFI bios and it installed ...


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Does this mean that I have multiple copies of GRUB taking up space? No, grub installs most of itself into the root filesystem partition (see subdirectories of /boot), so if by "installing multiple times" you mean overwriting one install after another, that's all overwritten too. EFI/GPT systems use some extra hidden space, but that will also always get ...



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