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12

You start at the beginning, square one. I'm sorry but you wiped everything, that's a brutal command. Not only did you wipe out the linux install, but you took the windows data with it. What you did didn't just wipe stuff in the partitions (/dev/sda1, 2, etc.), it wiped the partition table too because it matched /dev/sda which is the drive device itself. ...


9

You need to secure several things, as leaving any of these open introduces a door (it's not really a backdoor since it's all well documented) of similar impact. (Exception: if at step 1 you can physically secure the console as well, then you don't need to do anything else.) Physically secure the computer. You must prevent attackers from disconnecting the ...


6

When Windows installs itself, it puts a bootloader (NTLDR in NT through XP; winboot after that) in the master boot record that reads boot.ini to show you the boot list. Once you pick something from that list, the bootloader's job is done, and the appropriate kernel is started from an actual partition on your drive. Grub does the same thing; the bootloader ...


6

Check for currently-installed kernels: $ dpkg --get-selections | grep linux-image linux-image-2.6.38-2-686-bigmem install linux-image-2.6.32-5-686 install Check what current kernel you are running: $ uname --all Linux debian 2.6.38-2-686-bigmem #1 SMP Thu Apr 7 06:05:53 UTC 2011 i686 GNU/Linux Remove the kernel(s) you are ...


6

You can use grep on your MBR to figure out: sudo dd if=/dev/sda bs=512 count=1 2>&1 | grep GRUB sudo dd if=/dev/sda bs=512 count=1 2>&1 | grep LILO Only one of those should return a match. For more information and other ways to figure out, check this answer in askubuntu.


6

Here is the problem in your understanding: My understanding is that the bootloader GRUB2, is mounted to /boot. GRUB is not "mounted" on boot. GRUB is installed to /boot, and is loaded from code in the Master Boot Record. Here is a simplified overview of the modern boot process, assuming a GNU/Linux distribution with an MBR/BIOS (not GPT/UEFI): The ...


5

Here are some instructions on reinstalling grub2 in recent versions of Ubuntu. I'd recommend following the chroot method as I think that will be the easiest and safest way to restore your system. Additionally, the next time that you want to clean up drive space on /boot, you can use synaptic or apt-get to remove old kernels. For example: $ sudo ...


5

GRUB can't pass over the CD drive; this is something setup in BIOS. Either your Windows installation media isn't bootable for some reason or the laptop BIOS is set to try booting from the hard drive before the CD drive. When your laptop is first turned on a message will appear, something like "Press XXX to enter Setup", where XXX is some key sequence. Use ...


5

The ultimate goal is to restore the Master Boot Record (MBR) to the hard drive, removing Grub, so you can boot to your Windows partition in the future without stopping at the Grub command line. The easiest way to achieve this is to boot from your Windows 7 installation media. Use the Repair computer link and choose Command Line. At the command line, enter ...


5

This uuid "EFc551-(...)" probably is your 2TB disk (namely encrypted PV on it). You need to tell somehow your initramfs about this second PV. Probably update-initramfs will do it, something like (from knoppix): (assuming you've mounted your disk in /mnt/disk) cp -a /dev/* /mnt/disk/dev/ chroot /mnt/disk mount /proc mount /sys update-initramfs -u ...


5

I'm assuming you're using GRUB2 as your bootloader. You can disable the timeout by opening the file /etc/default/grub and changing the value of GRUB_TIMEOUT: GRUB_TIMEOUT=-1 will disable the timeout feature. See here for more information and settings.


4

There are only two versions of grub listed there, the 1x series (most recent being 0.97) and the 2x series (most recent being 1.99). Both can be customized and used for your purpose. The 1x series has more standard compatibility with old hardware and distros, but we the 2x series is coming along nicly and many major distros are switching to it. 32bit vs 64 ...


4

That password hash is salted. The salt is randomly generated and stored with the hash. The field delimiter between the salt and hash is the dollar sign ($). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt_%28cryptography%29


4

SysLinux/IsoLinux is a passable and popular choice for booting off El Torito-compliant optical media. But if your needs are somewhat non-standard, the most flexible solution is definitely GRUB (doesn't get more flexible than that without it being a full operating system). It's also the least easy to make an El Torito loader out of, but this may have changed ...


4

You probably don't want to skip grub and boot direct to Windows - that will prevent you from booting into linux. Instead, you want to make Windows the default boot entry. The following works on debian (and derivatives like ubuntu). The procedure is conceptually similar but differs significantly in the details on RH/Centos and other distros. apt-get ...


4

You don't seem to have a separate home partition. /dev/sda3 is an extended partition (hence the "Étendue" in fdisk -l), you will not be able to mount it and it will not contain your /home. Unless you have a 2nd hard disk, it appears you deleted your /home partition while installing Windows. The only partitions in sda are the Windows one (sda1), what I ...


4

(I'm adapting this answer from http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/11431/73, because it happens to work the same even though the question is different) First you need to do some prep work in /boot/grub/grub.conf. Change default to saved. In every OS block, add savedefault 0, where 0 is the index of whichever kernel you want it to default to unless told ...


4

Did you update on your 2TB hdd the /etc/fstab to point to the correct UUID of the encrypt volume? In case you don't know what is the UUID of the encrypt volume you can check by issuing the cmd: cryptsetup -v status /dev/ After you need to update your /etc/fstab and the grub configuration to point to the correct UUID. This should solve your question ...


3

The hard part is editing your Linux filesystem from Windows. FS Driver supports writing ext2, but I don't know of any good tools for ext3 or 4 (and these SU and SF questions aren't encouraging), let alone any other filesystems you may have used on your boot partition But if you do manage to get write support for your boot partition from Windows, actually ...


3

It's easy and low-risk. Just do the installation normally, and when the time comes to partition the disk, choose a manual partitioning strategy and make sure you override the Suse partition(s) only. Ubuntu will want to override Suse's bootloader with its own. Let it: Grub needs some files in /boot, which you're going to overwrite. The Grub installer will ...


3

This is my first instinct as a long-time Gentoo user: Mount the partition(s) with grub on it: mount /dev/sda5 /mnt/fedora # if Fedora had a separate /boot: mount /dev/sda923 /mnt/fedora/boot and copy the relevant section in $FEDORA/boot/grub/grub.conf into your Backtrack grub.conf. Not Fedora, but quick and easy. Alternatively: Mount the proc ...


3

Grub can boot FreeBSD and that's the way I'd do it because I'm more familiar with Grub. I gave up on FreeBSD because of driver problems but I was able to dual boot it with Ubuntu and you should be able to do so as well. Here is a post found by googling. Regarding partitions, you can make any setup you want because both Linux and BSD can boot from logical ...


3

The generic procedure to restore Grub is Boot into something Linux (either live CD or on disk, but must have Grub commands available) -- I don't know about other *nix Mount the partition that holds the OS with Grub to be fixed, be sure to mount the separated boot partition if you have it Issue the following command, remember to replace /mnt/suse and ...


3

You cannot 'uninstall' grub. You can overwrite it by Windows bootloader. I'm afraid that most people who know how to reinstall Windows bootloader without reinstalling Windows are on superuser (I guess for most people here Windows is the second system) - you have to do it from Windows install disk or similar tools. You should be able to chainload the Windows ...


3

Ok, so if it satisfies you to have the old pendrive work as the second one, here's how you can do it: Back-up the contents of the old pendrive. Once you have both pendrives attached and your system running, re-partition the old pendrive in similar manner to how the second one is partition - that is to say, make the /boot partition on the old one have the ...


3

Grub will look at the partition table entries of your drive. So if you modify the drive in the future, you might have to both re-install grub to the MBR and update the config file so that each root entry points at the right partition. Also note that the partition numbering is different for old (the 'legacy' 0.9x) and new (1.9x) grub versions. The original ...


3

The grub source code is the best place to find out. The necessary logic is in stage2/md5.c in: int md5_password (const char *key, char *crypted, int check) It produces strings of the form: $1$aaaaaaaa$bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb where the "aaaaaaaa" sequence is a random salt, and "bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb" is the result of the mixing of the password and the salt ...


3

You can use a linux rescue disk to put grub back on the disk's MBR. Then you should see your linux installation again. You may also want to add your Linux installation to the Windows boot-loader, so that if Windows ever over-writes the MBR again, you'll still be able to boot linux. read ...


3

You basically just need to edit your grub boot menu. As root, or using sudo, edit /boot/grub/menu.lst The first thing to do is change the timeout value to something more to your liking. timeout=30 Now you will want to enter an entry for your Windows hard drive. It should look something like this. title Windows rootnoverify (hd0,0) chainloader +1 ...


3

In addition to what uther suggests, you can also attempt to boot Windows directly from GRUB. You're using GRUB 0.97 (i.e. Grub ‘legacy’), so try this: chainload (hd0,0)+1 This will boot the first sector (+1) of the first partition (,0) of the first HD (hd0). Your partition layout may be different. Press Tab once or twice after typing the opening ...



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