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43

This is all due to the fact that the X server is out-dated, ill-suitable for today's graphics hardware and basically all the direct video card communication is done as an extension ("patch") over the ancient bloated core. The X server provides no builtin means of synchronization between user rendering the window and the screen displaying a window, so the ...


25

Open source drivers are getting pretty good these days. I haven't had any problem with Intel or AMD hardare. Intel I hear the old ones are pretty bad, but my G4500HD does everything I need well. Video acceleration could be better though. There isn't a proprietary driver for Intel either, your only choice is open source. The composited 3D desktop in KDE ...


19

In many systems less uses lesspipe, which can handle pdftotext automatically. Therefore, you can immediately try less file.pdf which will show the output of pdftotext in less.


18

You could use gnuplot for this: primes 1 100 |gnuplot -p -e 'plot "/dev/stdin"' produces something like You can configure the appearance of the graph to your heart's delight, output in various image formats, etc.


17

Although this post is based on facts, it still contains my personal experience and opinions. Nvidia Although there is a project for OpenSource drivers, you probably need to consider Nvidia being closed source drivers only. Now in case of Nvidia this doesn't really bring a lot of bad things since they really work on their drivers very hard. The best support ...


17

I can address your question, having previously worked with the Linux FB. How Linux Does Its FB. First you need to have FrameBuffer support in your kernel, corresponding to your hardware. Most modern distributions have support via kernel modules. It does not matter if your distro comes preconfigured with a boot logo, I don't use one and have FB support. ...


16

The X Window System uses a client-server architecture. The X server runs on the machine that has the display (monitors + input devices), while X clients can run on any other machine, and connect to the X server using the X protocol (not directly, but rather by using a library, like Xlib, or the more modern non-blocking event-driven XCB). The X protocol is ...


14

I'm not positive I know what you mean, but are you looking for something like this? I used Graphviz, which takes text input files describing transitions, and figures out the graph automatically. Here's the exact command: $ sed 's/-/_/g' input | gawk ' BEGIN {print "digraph g {"} END {print "}"} match($0, /from ([^ ]*) to ([^ ]*) \((.*)\)$/, ...


10

Check out the following lists of linux friendly graphics cards/chipsets, both open and proprietary: http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=category&item=Graphics%20Cards (provides benchmarks and reviews and all, pretty cool) http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Hardware-HOWTO/video.html http://hardware4linux.info/search/ ...


9

The traditional stack is built upon 3 main components: X server which handles displaying Window manager that put windows into frames, handles minimizing windows etc. That's part of separation of mechanism from policy in Unix Clients that perform useful task as displaying stackexchange website. They may use X protocol directly (suicide), use xlib or xcb ...


9

Ubuntu is a good choice for a first distribution, if you want something you can get up-and-running quickly and easily. You might also consider fedora as well. You can certainly theme an Ubuntu installation. See this thread for a good starting point - HowTo: theme your desktop


9

convert is a handy command line tool to do that. cd to the folder containing your png-files and run this command: convert -delay 10 -loop 0 *.png animation.gif Source: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1132058


9

Your laptop should have /sys/class/backlight. For example, /sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0/brightness. You can write (echo) values to this file to adjust brightness. cat /sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0/max_brightness > /sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0/brightness This will set the brightness to max. Just put it in an init script on boot.


9

Yes and no. Linux is perfectly happy to run even without a video terminal at all (consider serial console or "headless" setups). Linux is perfectly happy to run in 80x25 character mode with 16 colors. However, it would seem pretty wasteful to have a high-end graphics card doing nothing but displaying text at what amounts to 720x350 pixels screen ...


8

You may also try to use ffmpeg to create a movie out of a sequence of images and then convert the movie to a GIF animation (again using ffmpeg). # cf. http://pages.uoregon.edu/noeckel/MakeMovie.html # first convert an image sequence to a movie ffmpeg -sameq -i %03d.jpg output.mp4 # ... and then convert the movie to a GIF animation ffmpeg -i output.mp4 ...


8

I would do this in R. You'll have to install it but it shouold be available in your distributions repositories. For Debian-based systems, run sudo apt-get install r-base That should also bring in r-base-core but if it doesn't, run sudo apt-get install r-base-core as well. Once you have R installed, you could write a simple R script for this: ...


7

First of all, there is really no Linux graphics stack. Linux has no graphical display capabilities. However, Linux applications can use graphical displays and there are a number of different systems for doing that. The most common ones are all built on top of X windows. X is a network protocol because in the middle of an X protocol stack you can have a ...


7

Install the kernel-headers package and try again. If it doesn't work, try cp -v /usr/include/linux/version.h /lib/modules/$VERSION/build/include/linux Make sure that $VERSION corresponds with what you get when typing uname -r.


7

Screen tearing appears mostly because of two reasons - drivers that aren't there yet, and lack of vsync with certain window managers. As for drivers, both free and proprietary drivers support free-tearing compositing (nvidia and amd both). Be aware that e.g. enabling tear-free desktop in catalyst (fglrx) may cause frame drop and lags, so it is usually ...


6

The convert's --delay option only applies to the next image on the command line. So convert -delay 10 * will only set the delay of the first frame to 0.1 second. The option need to be repeated: convert $(for a in *; do printf -- "-delay 10 %s " $a; done; ) result.gif For your sorting need, convert does not sort frames, the shell globing * does. If you ...


6

I've finally found the solution to my problem!! First of all, many many thanks to all who contributed and in particular TechZilla and the detailed explanation he provided without which I think I would have given up long ago! So basically all that needs to be done is enable modesetting (modeset=1) when the i915 kernel module loads. This can be done the ...


6

I guess, it is not possible to see PDF file in terminal but you can check it's content by converting PDF file to text. You can do this as: pdftotext a.pdf It will produce a.txt file which you can read into VIM. For ubuntu-variant, this binary is available in following package. poppler-utils


5

Can you not run an X server on another tty and switch to it when you need to? If you have a machine next to you that is running X, then you can use X11 forwarding to have it display there.


5

ImageMagick provides a super-nice set of command-line tools for image manipulation. Check it out at http://www.imagemagick.org/.


5

Unfortunately, it's still very buggy, as per this post on the openSUSE forums lots of stuff still doesn't works: What I have working so far: Retina Display - openSUSE looks fantastic at 2880x1800! Booting in emulated BIOS mode Booting in EFI mode Keyboard and Trackpad - full support including the function key on the keyboard, the keyboard ...


5

As far as I can tell from your problem description the correct term for what you want is "hybrid graphics" as you only use either adapter to power your monitor (actually any output), not both at the same time. An overview over tools for what you want can be found (for example) here. You may be looking for the tool bbswitch from the Bumblebee-Project. Yet, ...


5

There is no fundamental reason for not being able to get the same quality output from graphics cards for the same hardware under Windows and Linux. However the development of software, both the drivers, and any application software, needs to be written and doing that both for Windows and for Linux just takes extra effort. Such double effort always takes ...


5

Try mplayer (or a frontend like smplayer). The issue is related to OpenGL hardware GPU accleration reference It would be helpful to know which GPU you have. Arch recently enabled SNA acceleration by default for Intel GPUs. If it's an older GPU (intel/nvidia/ati) it likely doesn't have support, so disable hw accel.


5

If it might be that a very simple terminal printout would suffice, and that you could be satisfied by inverted axes, consider the following: seq 1000 | grep -n 11 | while IFS=: read -r n match do printf "%0$((n/10))s\n" "$match" done The above charts an inverted trend on a 10% scale for every occurrence of the pattern 11 in the output of seq 1000. ...


4

Ubuntu offers all of that: It was designed from the on-set to be a newbie-friendly Debian; I've used both, and it certainly is easier, at least on the surface (i.e. the basic stuff). It has some of the largest collection of software of all distros; this includes a whole bunch of development stuff (all major programming languages, a whole bunch web ...



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