Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I've found the answer in the form of preseeding the netinstall. d-i apt-setup/local0/repository string http://repo.url/ dist main d-i apt-setup/local0/source boolean true d-i apt-setup/local0/key string http://key.url/ The above three preseed commands will respectively perform the following tasks: add the repository to sources.list automatically, include ...


0

These key flags are defined in the OpenPGP spec 5.2.3.21. Key Flags (N octets of flags) This subpacket contains a list of binary flags that hold information about a key. It is a string of octets, and an implementation MUST NOT assume a fixed size. This is so it can grow over time. If a list is shorter than an implementation ...


1

As an alternative to my other answer, I'd like to offer something else. Something beautiful ... dm-crypt. Plain dm-crypt (without LUKS) doesn't store anything about the key; on the contrary, cryptsetup is perfectly happy to open a plain device with any password and start using it. Allow me to illustrate: [root:tmp]# fallocate -l 16M cryptfile [root:tmp]# ...


1

What you want cannot be done with GnuPG. It can however be done with OpenSSL. You would need to use one of the ciphers (preferably AES) in a stream mode like cfb or ofb. (See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Block_cipher_mode_of_operation) Typically, when I use openssl to encrypt data, I use cbc as follows (with or without the base64-encoding (-a) ... and of ...


-1

@udkLpqc: I cannot comment above, it is up to you to use the tool or not, but what you wrote is somehow not what I see. I compiled it own my own on Ubuntu: $echo -e "uvwxyz\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n" | wc -l 11 $echo -e "uvwxyz\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n" | ./aes -p "t" | ./aes -d -p "t" | wc -l 11 This looks like same number of lines to me (I had same result using ...


1

I had the exact same requirement while writing my smartcard setup program. During testing I would not care about entropy, and I needed to generate multiple GPG keys in a row each test. As I described in my answer here the following script helped me speeding things up: #!/usr/bin/env python # For testing purposes only # DO NOT USE THIS, THIS DOES NOT ...


3

You can temporarily have /dev/random pull from /dev/urandom using rng-tools: # rngd -v -f -r /dev/urandom More information here: https://madebits.github.io/#blog/2014/2014-05-30-Making-dev-random-Temporary-Faster.md


-1

This tool does not store anything to verify the key. https://madebits.github.io/#r/cpp-aes-tool.md


7

You need to add --import to the command line to import the private key. --allow-secret-key-import doesn't ask gpg to import the key, it just gives it permission to import private keys. gpg --allow-secret-key-import --import private.key


1

First, find the public key you want to export: gpg --list-public-keys Look at the line marked 'pub'; it displays your public key type and number. For instance: pub 1024D/5000280F 2009-07-10 Use the number to do your export: gpg --armor --export 5000280F > klaatu_pubkey.asc Check to make sure it worked: cat klaatu_pubkey.asc As long as it's ...



Top 50 recent answers are included