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According to the doc, gpg has no global configuration file, it is strictly user-based and takes the config only from the ~/.gnupg directory or from a directory specified by --homedir option on the command line. As @sim noted, one solution is to alter the default skeleton file for creating the user's cfg file. On Debian, it is located here ...


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You can do it with a separate signature file. Sign the Document: % gpg --output doc.pdf.sig --detach-sig doc.pdf Distribute doc.pdf and doc.pdf.sig Verify the Document: % gpg --verify doc.pdf.sig doc.pdf


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Only practical example seems to be mentioned in a puppet bugreport - "yumrepo type does not support multiple gpgkey entries" which says that you need to use multi-line URLs instead of multiple gpgkey= entries. Hence it should look like this gpgkey=<url1> <url2> and not like this gpgkey=<url1> gpgkey=<url2> This is also ...


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Specify the numeric id: gpg --passwd 43E855BB


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Yes, gpg can encrypt and decrypt any file.


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There are two ways to achieve this goal: gpg <key-file> gpg, then the user is prompted to insert text. Now copy and paste the key text The key name and info will be printed to screen


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gpg --batch would work for that purpose.


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Tell your gpg-agent to enable its support for the ssh-agent protocol. You do this by starting it with --enable-ssh-support or by putting enable-ssh-support into ~/.gnupg/gpg-agent.conf. Tell the agent which key (or keys) you want to use for ssh authentication (note that the key must have the A (Authenticate) capability). You’ll have to find the keygrip ...


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So the problem turned out to be that if you sudo su - to the user, you cannot use gpg, you need to log directly in as the user. (At least on my companies server setup)



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