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This is an old question but still valuable to answer I believe to prevent misleading information. The package is signed as you can see from the message : Public key for chef-11.16.4-1.el6.x86_64.rpm is not installed However the key isn't installed... I tried to search for this package key but couldn't find an url for it (This is what led me here in fact). ...


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If chrooting, killing the agent, etc. don't work for you, swap the gpg folders, and reboot. If you still see your new keys, something isn't right in your setup, or the folder paths are not what you think they are.


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I suggest that you minimize your key before encoding it. gpg --export --export-options export-minimal Depending on how you've used your key in the past, it may save you old binding signatures.


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You're speaking of an app. That means you probably want to use a library, not a command line. How to do that is out of scope for UNIX & Linux SE (and you didn't even tell us what language your app is written in), but there are several libraries which can do what you want: OpenSSL's libcrypto has several primitives to deal with signature verification ...


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I encountered same problem when I was trying to add a GPG key behind a proxy. The solution to my problem was to add the --keyserver-options in the command: sudo apt-key adv --keyserver-options http-proxy=http://USER:PASSWORD@PROXY_URL:PORT/ --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com --recv-keys GPG_KEY


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It makes no sense to encrypt a file with a private key. Using a private key to attach a tag to a file that guarantees that the file was provided by the holder of the private key is called signing, and the tag is called a signature. There is one popular cryptosystem (textbook RSA) where a simplified (insecure) algorithm uses has public and private keys of ...


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Use openssl to do that. Follow a simple exemple: To encrypt a file: openssl rsautl -encrypt -inkey public_key.pem -pubin -in <decrypted file> -out <encrypted file> To decrypt a file: openssl rsautl -decrypt -inkey private_key.pem -in <encripted file> -out <decrypted file>


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The problem seems to be related to pinentry and the tty. The same command works perfectly with Ubuntu. tty in a Alpine Linux container displays /0 while tty in a Ubuntu container shows /dev/console By first exporting a correct tty for gpg (export GPG_TTY=/dev/console) the command works and shows the password dialog.


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Yes, using a pipe from gpg to tar, and tar can extract just one file, but you may have to read & decrypt most or all of the archive depending on where the wanted file is (start or end). The entire archive is not saved anywhere, but tar still has to search through it. Yes, keeping a list of & only saving the new & changed files for the incremental ...


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You should specify a keyserver to use.I typically use --keyserver wwwkeys.uk.pgp.net (you can use a lot of different country codes instead of uk, but I know that one works).


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Duplicity does not cache gpg pass phrases by default (you can give them as env vars though). All prompts you see are from the gpg binary run underneath. Hence, when you configure your gpg into the desired state, duplicity will use it as configured and you are set. For using gpg-agent read what the parameter --use-agent does on the manpage: http://duplicity....



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