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3

You can use the --list-packets option to get a dump of what's in a gpg file. The description of the file format is RFC 4880 (OpenPGP standard). The signature does not directly contain a hash. It contains information that allows verifying both the hash and the sender: there is a signature verification algorithm, which takes a hash value and a public key as ...


0

Yes, digital signatures are usually secure hashes, which are signed by the secret key of the signer. Signing the whole message is a lot more slow and not more secure. Additionally the algorithm should take care of the length of blocks, padding (in a manner not to disclose too much information), etc. Note: also on asymmetric encryption, for speed reason, ...


-2

At ubuntu a standard keyserver is set. You can add the entry: keyserver NAME_OF_KEYSERVER in file ~/.gnupg/gpg.conf


3

The missing key is the key for the Samsung Unified Linux Driver Repository. Following the instructions added to the website yesterday should fix things: wget http://www.bchemnet.com/suldr/pool/debian/extra/su/suldr-keyring_1_all.deb sudo dpkg -i suldr-keyring_1_all.deb (assuming you trust the repository of course!).


2

You can start gpg-agent remotely and create remote UNIX socket port forwarding to your host and then use the gpg-agent locally. In short Connect to the server and start gpg-agent (if it is not running yet) and ensure it stays running. It is listening on socket defined in environment variable $GPG_AGENT_INFO. Store the path: eval `gpg-agent --daemon` ...


0

GnuPG uses a pluggable and configurable pinentry implementation, usually through symlinks on /usr/bin/pinentry or similar solutions. On Debian and derivatives shipping the update-alternative system, you can display which one is setup running update-alternatives --display pinentry and change it through update-alternatives --config pinentry If you ...


1

The gpg-agent man page explains under the option --enable-ssh-support that the ssh agent protocol is not able to provide the name of the tty to the agent, so it defaults to using the original terminal it was started in. Before running the ssh command that requires a passphrase in a new terminal you need to type gpg-connect-agent updatestartuptty /bye in ...


2

The key could not be encoded as a single QR code. But two (or more) could work. Export your key (as before): gpg --export-secret-keys --armor > private.key Generate files of a maximun size of 2500 byte: split -C 2500 private.key splitkey- Convert each to one QR file (same name with extension .qr) for file in splitkey-??; do <"$file" qrencode ...


1

Try to install the keyring: sudo apt-get install --allow-unauthenticated linuxmint-keyring Then: sudo rm -rf /var/lib/apt/lists/* apt update sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade


1

You may be interested in paperkey, which is designed to take a GPG secret key, and transform it into a sequence of bytes that can be printed out on paper. The secret key can be subsequently recovered from the text after scanning it or keying it in. There's also a discussion of various ways of archiving data on paper which you might find interesting.


3

I just found out that this is not possible. % wc -c ~/private.key 6709 /home/toogley/private.key (-c counts characters.) to cite from wikipedia: max characters for alphanumerical characters: 4,296.


6

Your error message already gives a hint as to what's wrong! Your one-liner is providing the actual file content as filename to the qrencode program. Hence the error message. Try qrencode -o test.png -t png < private.key. You should take a look at shell input-output redirection. For example, I/O Redirection. I see that you too have found your way to ...



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