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9

You're not going to be able to use GParted because the filesystem is on LVM and GParted does not support that. First, TAKE A BACKUP OF THE VM. Then perform the following as "root" from a command line. It looks like you've already rebooted but just in case, ensure the kernel recognizes the larger disk echo 1 > /sys/class/scsi_disk/0:0:0:0/device/rescan ...


6

Short answer: You can use the same swap partition as the data in swap is not preserved from one boot to the next. It is totally normal to have multiple linux installations on a disk with a single swap. There is one exception/caveat I know of, however: if you use hibernate (aka, 'suspend to disk'), hibernate uses your swap space for storage. If you then ...


5

There is a possibility to recover the partition table, but it requires 2 conditions be met: You have not rebooted your machine. The drive was in use at the time the table was changed. How this works is that the kernel keeps the partition layout in memory. If a partition is in use, it needs to know where the partition starts, so it will refuse to reload ...


4

It appears that the device file does not exist. You can verify this by doing ls /dev/sdb6. Try running the command partprobe, or sudo partprobe as user. This should detect the devices and create the according device files. This may return the error Error informing the kernel about modifications to partition /dev/sdb5 -- Device or resource busy If it ...


4

Your drive is a LVM physical volume. Your free space is being managed by lvm. Look at vgdisplay to find free space in your volume group and lvcreate to create a new partition from that space. To grow a partition you will first lvextend the logical volume then (if ext2/3/4) resize2fs to size the filesystem to the new volume size.


4

It's perfectly safe to convert your unallocated space to a partition while your system is running. The only practical danger is in human error (i.e., yours) or a power loss while the partition table is being written. These just as likely to happen while booted normally as they are booted from a Live CD.


2

Since "when booted" means that the OS that needs to make changes and write to the disk, is also running from the same disk, has a higher potential for problems/disaster if something goes wrong. Following Murphy's Law, "Anything that can go wrong, will", you are safest to run the operation isolated from the operating system. My suggestion would be to use ...


2

The process appears to be: create a new partition in your newly available free space; your choice of filesystem doesn't much matter, as we will change it later reboot into the system use cfdisk to flag the new partition as Linux LVM instead of whatever you chose above use pvcreate to flag your new partition as a physical volume for LVM use vgextend to add ...


2

You have copy & pasted a lot of unnecessary transcripts but your first paragraph pretty much says it all: When I run sudo gparted on a live ubuntu USB, I get Input/output error during read on /dev/sdc. So you have a defective disk. The error comes directly on /dev/sdc (not /dev/sdc1 or /dev/sda2, etc...) so it applies to the whole disk. Therefore ...


2

You can't enlarge it with GParted because it currently does not support HFS+ partition "grow". It only supports HFS+ "shrink". See Gparted features or, on your machine: GParted >> View >> File System Support


2

You might want to check out CrunchBang. Like Ubuntu, it is based on Debian, however, it uses the Openbox window manager and in turn is significantly lighter on resources. I can't tell you specifically how well it will work on an Inspiron 630m, but it is definitely a solid distro. The project lead, Philip Newborough, has done an incredible job of blending ...


2

From what I found, this laptop is powerful enough to run a lightweight GUI (like XFCE, Openbox etc...). You could start using Debian (which isn't much more complicated than Ubuntu) or Arch Linux (which is more difficult, but will be a good experience).


2

First, to avoid messing up, you should backup an entire image of the disk (provided you have a bigger disk to store it). For this, several solutions are proposed on this question, last time i did it, I used dd. Once you are sure you can restore the image in case of problem, you can use testdisk to redetect the partition table and fix it. This question for ...


2

do I need to have a swap partition for each distro or can LFS use the swap partition I already have? As goldilock says, unless you are hibernating (suspend to disk), yes. Otherwise no, because you could overwrite swap of a hibernated system - either it's saved state or the part that was used as regular swap at suspend time. If so, would the swap ...


2

To have more space for your Linux installation you need to expand sda6. Having freed up 10GB by shrinking sda3 you would then expand sda4 by 10GB and expand sda6 to fill up all of sda4. However, resizing existing partions, especially NTFS ones, always bares the risk of loosing all data on that partition! I don't know anybody who ever experienced loss of ...


2

Easy. Go into your VM as root. Type "fdisk -l" - if you already see the new disk size - good. If not - try partprobe - if you still do not see the new disk size - reboot. Now fdisk /dev/sda Write down you starting cylinder for the second partition. "Delete" the second partiton Recreate the second partiton, same starting cylinder, last cylinder for end ...


2

No it will not move the entire extended partition nor make the space contigious. Although in theory the extended partition could just be recreated with the same logical partitions, that would mean that the entries stay in place (with some zero size first, logical partition), or you would have to rearange the Extended partition information. Both that would ...


1

Ok Massive thanks to neutrinus for pointing me in the right direction and for this post: http://allaboutfedora.blogspot.de/2007/01/how-to-resize-or-expand-lvm-partitions.html I did: init 3 sudo lvextend -L+19GB /dev/mapper/vg_chris-lv_root sudo resize2fs /dev/mapper/vg_chris-lv_root where -L means "size" and +19GB adds 19GB, running resize2fs without ...


1

It turns out that I didn't know that GParted defaults to saving 5% of the partition's space for super-user. See this AU Q&A titled: "Why is there 4.86(maybe 15.1) GB of USED-space on a newly partitioned and formatted 298 GB drive (as ext4 by Gparted)". excerpt from mkfs.ext4 man page -m reserved-blocks-percentage Specify the percentage of the ...


1

Make a backup of the partition table (sfdisk -d /dev/sda >sda.txt (DOS MBR) or sgdisk --backup=<file> <device> (GPT)). Delete the partition. Restore the partition table from the backup. Warning: Under certain conditions deleting even an unused partition may prevent your Linux from booting. This can happen if the system has references to a ...


1

I don't know if gparted can do this. Most partition programs would delete sda5-x when you delete/recreate the extended partition. You could try sfdisk. # sfdisk -d /dev/sda > sda.original That creates a dump of the partition layout like so: # partition table of /dev/sda unit: sectors /dev/sda1 : start= 2048, size= 4194304, Id= c /dev/sda2 : ...


1

There are several places you can have "free disk space". You can have disk space that is not in a partition (unpartitioned space). You can have an unused partition. You can have free space in a LVM physical volume. Generally, a LVM physical volume sits on top of a partition. You can have free space in a filesystem. A filesystem sits on top of a LVM ...


1

Keep only /boot in the first partition First, 243MB is enough for /boot. If it's the root partition that you have on /dev/sda1, then there isn't enough room even for a basic installation. If you've separated /usr, don't: this was useful in the days of read-only or shared /usr but isn't nowadays. To move the root partition: Move all the files to the ...


1

The card does not have a Master Boot Record (MBR). If it had your hexdump would have given you at least one partition entry at offset 0x1C0 and 55aa at the end. Not all partition tables lay out data in the first 512 bytes. The spurious data you see is SID and CSD register of (a / the) SD card. But from the looks of it it is not the correct data for the card ...


1

I would try using the sfdisk command as opposed to dd. For example: $ sudo sfdisk -d /dev/sda > /tmp/mbr_using_sfdisk.bin Warning: extended partition does not start at a cylinder boundary. DOS and Linux will interpret the contents differently. Now looking at mbr_using_sfdisk.bin reveals what you're looking for: $ more /tmp/mbr_using_sfdisk.bin # ...


1

Your question doesn't explicitly say what you want to do, but I guess you want to use that spare 11GB of space to expand /dev/sda6. You won't be able to do this while you are running Linux from the sda6 partition - the usual solution is to use a LiveCD, perhaps SystemRescueCD, to run GParted. The best way to do this is: Resize/Move your extended ...


1

You have to manually remove entries from /etc/fstab. Why do you care what the partition number is anyhow? It doesn't really matter, but if you really want to, you can use fdisk in sector mode ( use -u or the u command ) to list the current partitions, delete them, and recreate them with different numbers, but the same start and end sectors.


1

First of all, if you have moved the beginning of the partition, chances are rather high, that you can only wave the filesystem there goodbye. The reason is, that the beginning of a filesystem usually contains a very important data structures (usually called supeblock) without which the data in the filesystem is inaccessible. Maybe some utility exists that ...


1

It's not just that the partition table isn't correct: there is an error when trying to read it. So whatever is wrong isn't due to the aborted installation attempt. That could have left the data on the disk in an inconsistent state, but it wouldn't have made the disk unreadable. You have a hardware or driver failure. It's probably the disk, but it could be ...


1

First of all don't use ppa repos for this. The dvd+rw-tools package is available in the main debian repositories. Edit /etc/apt/sources.list and add this line: deb ftp://ftp.debian.org/debian/ wheezy main contrib non-free The update the list of available packages: $ sudo apt-get update Now you should be able to install dvd+rw-tools: $ sudo apt-get ...



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