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With man, you can always give an absolute path to a manual page. For the built-in BSD utilities, this will be something like: man /usr/local/share/man/man1/tar.1 Now, this isn't particularly convenient, since you have to know the exact path to the page. For GNU utilities with the same name as built-in BSD utilities, you can note that brew installs manual ...


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More likely than not, they're in the same section of the manpages, e.g., 1. But you can get all of the manpages for a given name using the -a option, and pick through the result: man -a tar More complicated, you can tell man which directories to search using the -M option, e.g., man -M /usr/local/man tar for brew, and man -M /usr/man tar for OSX. ...


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Firstly, breaking vendor space (here, the /usr/bin directory) is rather a bad idea, as other vendor packages may depend on make 4.1 being available, or vendor updates to make may conflict or break on account of the manual changes made to the vendor space, or perhaps undo your changes. A better option is to install your version of make elsewhere, for example ...


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(As this does not answer the question, this is should have been a comment, but is too long - so treat it as a comment). As an alternative to FreeBSD's xargs you can use GNU Parallel which does not have this limitation. It even supports repeating the context: seq 10 | parallel -Xj1 echo con{}text seq 10 | parallel -mj1 echo con{}text GNU Parallel is a ...



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