New answers tagged

0

Short answer: no, GNU screen cannot do this. Long answer: GNU screen largely ignores the xterm mouse protocol, except for a special case where it accepts mouse clicks (the "mousetrack" feature). To make selection work as you suggest would take a lot more work: The xterm mouse protocol works by making the terminal send escape sequences to your application....


1

You can use the -Q option % screen -S 2908.pts-0.mymachine -Q windows 0- spam 1* news 6 ksh Unfortunately this truncates if there's more than fits across the terminal width (basically it causes the command to run and displayed in the message line, but also copies it to the current stdout).


2

Two options with job control: you ran the command as screen mycommand -abc -other -args. In this case, use Ctrl ad to detach. Then cursor up or type history | tail. Use screen -r to reattach. you started screen and ran your command in the new session. In this scenario you can (probably) Ctrl z to suspend the process. Then cursor up or type history | tail. ...


0

You can do the following: 1. Use "screen -x " command to attach to the existing screen session 2. Do "C-a Escape" to Enter scrollback/copy mode. Once in scrollback mode, you can use the regular movement keys (Search for "Movement keys" in the "man screen" page to find different movement options) to scroll back up to the point where the command is executed ...


-1

Use the force, Luke! Use RequestTTY force in your ~/.ssh/config for the desired host.


0

A simple way of sharing that might work for you would be to start a Xvnc virtual X11 server with vncserver :1 on one machine, and run your application in it, and then connect to it simultaneously from many different workstations with vncviewer -shared host:1. All users see the same desktop and share keyboard and mouse actions. When the users disconnect ...


0

You don't have to change your key bindings. Whilst the pane you wish to move has focus, type Prefix then :join-pane -t :1 where 1 is whatever the destination window's number is in the same session. You can move it to another session by prepending its name like project:3. For me join-pane tab-autocompletes from j. Add an -h or -v switch to the command to ...


0

Try adding the line defnonblock on to your ~/.screenrc file. When I began having the same problem I found a few posts mentioning that it fixed their issues. It fixed mine.


2

If you have a terminal whose description "looks" like xterm, screen assumes it does everything like xterm. For whatever reason, it equates xterm-titles and xterm-mouse features: in termcap.c, it checks if either the TERM environment variable contains the string "xterm" or "rxvt" — or it checks if there is a key definition for kM with the xterm-style ...


1

screen does not know about the wheel-mouse. It only knows about keys (including escape-sequences) sent by the terminal and its keyboard: screen knows about mouse-clicks (its source-code mentions only "left mouse-click"). You can read the source-code (display.c) to see that it does no more than that (this, in particular, is the only place where screen ...


0

I use this: (`echo ${STY} | sed -e 's/[0-9]*\.//g'`:${WINDOW}:`screen -Q title`) removes the process number from ${STY} includes the window number (as mentioned "at creation time") includes the window title (as returned from screen -Q title) notes: first time it runs, screen -Q waits for a return keystroke i set the window title with C-a C-A and then ...


0

The tmux approach is to use three sessions: an outer session for the panes, an inner session for the windows (you can attach to this from one pane), a secondary view onto the inner session (for the other pane). Yes this is UNIX philosophy gone mad. Let's get started. # Create a session to hold the multiple windows $ tmux new-session -s inner <...


1

In general, Ctrl+A is reserved for screen itself. So to actually send Ctrl+A, use Ctrl+A then A. In your case the bash Ctrl+A puts the cursor to the beginning of the input line and Ctrl+K deletes everything until the end of it. Within screen, you wanna do Ctrl+A, A, Ctrl+K.


3

If by "prompt" you are referring to the GNU screen prompt by Ctrl-A and :, that gets cleared by Ctrl-U. That is standard for most command-line applications; the others are bash-specific.



Top 50 recent answers are included