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3

If by "prompt" you are referring to the GNU screen prompt by Ctrl-A and :, that gets cleared by Ctrl-U. That is standard for most command-line applications; the others are bash-specific.


2

Two options with job control: you ran the command as screen mycommand -abc -other -args. In this case, use Ctrl ad to detach. Then cursor up or type history | tail. Use screen -r to reattach. you started screen and ran your command in the new session. In this scenario you can (probably) Ctrl z to suspend the process. Then cursor up or type history | tail. ...


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If you have a terminal whose description "looks" like xterm, screen assumes it does everything like xterm. For whatever reason, it equates xterm-titles and xterm-mouse features: in termcap.c, it checks if either the TERM environment variable contains the string "xterm" or "rxvt" — or it checks if there is a key definition for kM with the xterm-style ...


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You can use the -Q option % screen -S 2908.pts-0.mymachine -Q windows 0- spam 1* news 6 ksh Unfortunately this truncates if there's more than fits across the terminal width (basically it causes the command to run and displayed in the message line, but also copies it to the current stdout).


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screen does not know about the wheel-mouse. It only knows about keys (including escape-sequences) sent by the terminal and its keyboard: screen knows about mouse-clicks (its source-code mentions only "left mouse-click"). You can read the source-code (display.c) to see that it does no more than that (this, in particular, is the only place where screen ...


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In general, Ctrl+A is reserved for screen itself. So to actually send Ctrl+A, use Ctrl+A then A. In your case the bash Ctrl+A puts the cursor to the beginning of the input line and Ctrl+K deletes everything until the end of it. Within screen, you wanna do Ctrl+A, A, Ctrl+K.



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