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3

You're probably thinking of the alternate screen feature, which allows full-screen applications such as htop to display in a different view, and on completion returning to the normal view (without the application showing). That is the altscreen setting in your .screenrc, described in the manual: Command: altscreen state If set to on, "alternate ...


3

Use emacs, start an inferior shell and issue your command. The output will be available in the shell buffer and can be selected using the usual commands. Alternatively, select file in $(find <whatever>); do vi $file; break; done The emacs approach is more practical if you already know the editor. Emacs can run arbitrary "inferior processes", ie. ...


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The question (and suggested answer) are a little obscure, but what is being described is mutt's use of the default color feature of ncurses (or slang). If your mutt color scheme uses the word "default" for the foreground or background, then at runtime mutt will ask ncurses/slang to use the terminal's default color. Whether in an application such as mutt or ...


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It's possible for screen to be confused. You can detach your session, run reset outside screen, re-attach to the session and run reset within screen. With any reset, the terminal (or window) would be cleared, but at least you should be able to resume whatever is running in the window(s). Besides reset, I find these useful (they do not make a full reset): ...


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If you want to recreate all the windows you can put in your ~/.screenrc lines with the name, number and command, eg: screen -t root 0 bash screen -t bash 1 bash screen -t alpha 3 bash or you can run from the command line the equivalent commands eg: $ screen -S work -X screen -t samsung 6 bash If you want to name or rename existing windows you can do ...


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In the terminal type clear That should do the trick


1

Try C-a Z (GNU Screen 'reset')



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