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Moving mouse to bottom of the screen is usually enough to show bottom panel. Just move the mouse to bottom and a little bit more down ;) I know, sometimes it doesn't work for the first time. Second way is to use keyboard shortcut – windows key (left to the left alt) + m. Panel is not supposed to hide automatically, so clicking away from it's area or another ...


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I have found a solution to my problem. I don't know the default behavior of the Overview w/o extensions (because I installed the Workspace Grid extension almost immediately), but it turns out that my experience is not the default behavior with Workspace Grid installed. Indeed, the Workspace List is supposed to appear as soon as the Overview is brought up, ...


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This gentleman's link was very helpful Has a great answer: Anyway, now you have your resolution set to whatever you need it to be. You’ll need to copy the settings file, which is located at ~/.config/monitors.xml. That file contains your display settings. In order to proceed further, you’re going to need access to root. I’m going to assume that you’ll ...


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Yes, there is a dconf value that controls this. Run the following command to disable drawing of the desktop by Nautilus: gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.background show-desktop-icons false Source: http://askubuntu.com/a/237984/81372


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The monitors.xml file stores the monitors settings as configure by Gnome System Settings. It can store configurations for multiple monitor setups and the user's personal choice of screen resolution. Gnome System Settings uses the XRANDR extension to reconfigure the display(s) on the fly. As you found, and as can be read here, the content of the file isn't ...


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GNOME has a mechanism for building dev versions with JHBuild. It won't replace the packaged version of GNOME included in CentOS7 (which is probably for the best).


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What the previous person said, and if you're up for the challenge, you could download the source packages from the GNOME git repo, and compile everything yourself. But that would require you to uninstall GNOME, all related dependencies, then you will have to correct any build errors, if any, apply some patches, wait a couple hours, to days for it to compile, ...


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Q1: does this mean I'm using Gnome 3.8.4? Yes you're using GNOME 3.8.4 from that gnome-shell output. Q2: can I upgrade to Gnome 3.10? Yes but I've found no repositories that offer it as of yet so your only recourse is to compile it yourself from sources. You can make this a little less painful by trying to use the source RPMS (SRPMS) from a ...



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