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3

That button locks/unlocks screen orientation on devices that can detect which way they are held - usually touchscreen devices - see Screen orientation section on the gnome wiki touchscreen page: Easy ability to temporarily disable and enable auto-rotation (rotation lock). It was introduced a couple of years ago: Add an orientation lock action button. The ...


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In Ubuntu, I use these commands: ssh -X user@host gnome-session or ssh -Y user@host gnome-session


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This is not a solution but I know where the problem comes from. Gnome Shell uses the WM_CLASS property to associate apps to their ".desktop" files. Reference IPython Qtconsole's WM_CLASS value is empty and that is why you do not see any title up there. I reported an upstream bug. You could create a .desktop file without a name that would temporarily fix ...


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I removed every package related to Desktop and Window environment with aptitude and installed x-window-system, xfce4, gdm3, vnc4server.


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The problem has been fixed. The column was hidden. I uninstalled the whole package and re installed and then I could move the first "name" header.


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Unmount the USB-drive and open up a new terminal. First get the device name with: sudo fdisk -l (Example: /dev/sdb1) Create new a mount point: sudo mkdir -p /mnt/usb Then mount the USB-drive back on with ownership set to you: sudo mount -o uid=$(id -u),gid=$(id -g) /dev/sdb1 /mnt/usb/ In the command above, the only thing you have to change is the ...


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If you right click on the column title bar (where is says TamaƱo, Tipo, Modificado) a menu should pop up. From the menu you can tick the columns you want to see in the interface. Tick the Name column and your problem should be solved.


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Debian Live Standard is Debian without the Graphical User Interface. Debian Live Gnome is Debian Standard with Gnome.


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The bash construct $(command) will expand into the output of command. You could use it thusly: gconftool-2 --type string \ --set /desktop/gnome/background/picture_filename \ "$(find /usr/share/backgrounds/scenery/ | grep jpg | shuf -n1)" Note that I kept your find command exactly as you put it in your question, but perhaps it would be better expressed ...


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Go to distrowatch.com and look for a small distro. An example small linux is puppy linux at http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=puppy . They have a search when you can look for "Old Computers" which is there best synonym to small. ...


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Please note that a gnome-session-fallback and usual Ubuntu terminal which is in really a gnome-terminal will not make you a running system. A system needs much more to be alive, It needs a kernel, drivers, I/O modules , Window Manager , File Manager , etc.... So you have many choices to make a minimal Ubuntu running system. One of them as answered before ...


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You won't have a working system with just gnome-session-fallback and "usual ubuntu terminal" (whatever that is). For one, gnome-session-fallback has lots and lots of other packages as required direct and indirect dependencies. If you want to install the absolute strict minimum to get a working gnome-session-fallback, you can use two approaches: Use the ...


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By "create" I think you mean "install". Since your post is tagged Ubuntu what you want is a minimal install ISO that you can download from here. Note that even a minimal distro will contain quite a bit more than two packages. If you really want to build your own Linux (not recommended for beginners) you can try the Linux From Scratch project.


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It can be done by adding custom actions to policykit. If you want to run gedit as root with pkexec you have to create new file /usr/share/polkit-1/actions/org.freedesktop.policykit.gedit.policy for example: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!DOCTYPE policyconfig PUBLIC "-//freedesktop//DTD PolicyKit Policy Configuration 1.0//EN" ...


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Following command gives the names of workspaces:- gsettings get org.gnome.desktop.wm.preferences workspace-names You can use xdotool:- NAME xdotool - command-line X11 automation tool DESCRIPTION xdotool lets you programatically (or manually) simulate keyboard input and mouse activity, move and resize windows, etc. It does this using ...


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The other solution1 has some inconveniences: - it requires root access - it's a global change so it affects all users - upgrading sound-theme-freedesktop restores the file For the record, the proper way to do it (and avoid all of the above) is via a custom sound theme that disables2 the default sound file used by gnome-screenshot (the name of the file is ...


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I followed one of the suggestions and went to gnome.extensions.com. There I found Notifications Alert (blinks the right icons at the top bar) and Panel OSD (which repositions and expands the alerts). They improved the situation a bit. I'll wait for Gnome 3.16 + Fedora 22 to be stable to see the new notifications. It should be release soon.


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The problem was I ghc packages installed were installed in /usr/lib/ghc/package.conf.d but not in /home/guillaume/.ghc/x86_64-linux-7.8.4/package.conf.d. I just copied them and everything was working. Thank you


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Yes, it does have an icon name: inode-fifo. The icon name usually matches the mime type, in this case inode/fifo. And yes, you cannot find it in the official docs because the specification does not list all possible icon names it only aims to (emphasize mine): lay out a standard naming scheme for icon creation, as well as providing a minimal list of must ...


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Press: CTRL+ALT+F1 Then login and restart your gdm, kdm , or so on. It's related to your Desktop Environment.


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More searching suggested that logging out and back in to create a new desktop session would resolve the problem. I tried it and it worked. Apparently, even though gconfd-2 was running, it wasn't hooked up to D-BUS properly.


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It is shown after you have selected a user. Hit enter or click on your name. A gear-wheel will appear where you can choose the session to run. If you plan to use KDE, I'd suggest changing GDM to KDM. systemctl disable gdm systemctl enable kdm reboot


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You don't need to mess with init scripts. In Debian, you can just add a line in /etc/init.d/rc.local that calls the program; it will then be run after all the init scripts. If you call the program in /etc/init.d/boot.local instead, it will run only at boot, not when switching runlevels.


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dconf-service is automatically started by the session daemon1 when needed, as per the same documentation page: Users or administrators should never need to start the service, as it will be automatically started by dbus-daemon(1) whenever an application tries to write settings. Reading values from the dconf database does not involve the service; it is only ...


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This has never happened to me but this is more a "menu" issue than an application one. As a starting point I suggest you navigate to the file ~/.config/menus/gnome-application.menu See if its listed there and if there are any issues with the listing. There is also an app called "menulibre" which allows you to add/modify icon names. It available in the ...



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