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10

The TERM environment variable is a way that you, the user, can tell programs (e.g., grep, less and vim) what kind of terminal they are running on, so they will know its parameters, including what capabilities it has and what escape sequences it needs to issue to access them.  This exists because it’s too hard, in general, for the software to determine this ...


0

In order to simplify the problem and since your are getting the variable sitename, why don't you read a username variable? With that you'd make sure that the script execution is not dependent on the environmental variables made available the way the script is executed.


0

If, for some reason, $USER is not set, you can use the id command to obtain the identity of the real user. So the first time you use the $USER variable, you can use the shell expansion to supply a default value. Change the chown line in your script to: sudo chown ${USER:=$(/usr/bin/id -run)}:$USER /var/www/$sitename If USER is empty or unset when this ...


1

Copy/paste between Wayland windows and XWayland windows does not work yet (it has not been implemented). I can't manage to find any official source on this, but here are a couple of links to posts saying exactly this: http://www.phoronix.com/forums/forum/software/desktop-linux/49641-gtk-3-18-plans-for-full-wayland-support-a-scenegraph?p=631866#post631866 ...


0

Go to distrowatch.com and look for a small distro. An example small linux is puppy linux at http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=puppy . They have a search when you can look for "Old Computers" which is there best synonym to small. ...


1

Please note that a gnome-session-fallback and usual Ubuntu terminal which is in really a gnome-terminal will not make you a running system. A system needs much more to be alive, It needs a kernel, drivers, I/O modules , Window Manager , File Manager , etc.... So you have many choices to make a minimal Ubuntu running system. One of them as answered before ...


4

You won't have a working system with just gnome-session-fallback and "usual ubuntu terminal" (whatever that is). For one, gnome-session-fallback has lots and lots of other packages as required direct and indirect dependencies. If you want to install the absolute strict minimum to get a working gnome-session-fallback, you can use two approaches: Use the ...


1

By "create" I think you mean "install". Since your post is tagged Ubuntu what you want is a minimal install ISO that you can download from here. Note that even a minimal distro will contain quite a bit more than two packages. If you really want to build your own Linux (not recommended for beginners) you can try the Linux From Scratch project.


0

Due to the new client/server architecture (details here) you'll have to start separate instances of gnome-terminal-server. To do that you could use the --app-id switch: /usr/lib/gnome-terminal/gnome-terminal-server --app-id my.first.Terminal then use the client (with the same app-id) to create terminals1 inside the new server : gnome-terminal --app-id ...


2

According to man gnome-terminal, the option you're looking for appears to be the confusingly-named --disable-factory Do not register with the activation name server, do not re-use an active terminal. However, the option is apparently removed in more recent releases so should not be relied on.


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The issue was the tmux version 1.8. I used advice from here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/25940944/ugrade-tmux-from-1-8-to-1-9-on-ubuntu-14-04 Upgraded tmux to version 1.9a, and the problem went away.


2

The value of $TERM must be screen-256color, so that Vim correctly detects the availability of 256 colors. (tmux reuses the terminal definitions of screen, as this tool implements similar multiplexing.) You either need to set the correct value for TERM inside tmux (sorry, I don't know how this is best done), or force 256 colors in your ~/.vimrc via set ...


0

Gnome-terminal supports this feature beginning with version 3.12 (actually it's the underlying library vte >= 0.36 that matters).


2

Older versions of gnome-terminal, as shipped until Ubuntu Utopic, used to implement an "automatic" "dual" behavior. If you had at least 6 tabs, Alt+6 would switch to the 6th; otherwise it would send the keystroke to whichever app was running inside (e.g. emacs). Newer versions (beginning with Ubuntu Vivid) don't have this automatic behavior anymore. Alt+1 – ...



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