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It depends on how terminal works, really. Some terminals aim to be lightweight, others do not. Some features require more overhead which can have visible impact(this is what you've encountered). You may want to look for lightweight terminal emulators, try out few and pick the one that fits you best. I've personally used Sakura nad Terminator, both of which ...


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Emacs has an extension called Org mode (Ubuntu: org-mode) which does, errrm, stuff, including agenda facilities. The Org mode agenda can be synchronized with Google Calendar, though it appears not to be foolproof; see the Org mode Google Calendar Synchronization tutorial, and try org-caldav or org-gcal (both installable with M-x package-install in Emacs). ...


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Take a look at: gcalcli, and also: remind , which has PHP scripts to convert iCAL entries to Remind format.


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I'm on fedora now yet I suggest you to read Archlinux's wiki carefully, all of it: Home and End keys not working. What I did to fix it: Press Ctrl-V Home, the escaped sequence for Home key is printed. It is not \e[4~ and \e[1~ as I expected to be by looking at /etc/inputrc. It was [H and [F Extract the terminal info infocmp $TERM >terminfo.src Open ...


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All the files there are X resources files for Rxvt (most of them specifically for Urxvt, the Unicode-aware version of Rxvt). They are not generic terminal emulator configuration files, they are configuration file for that specific terminal emulator. They can't be used by Gnome-terminal. If you want to try them out, install the rxvt-unicode package. Download ...


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I use: echo $COLUMNS instead of stty. Maybe it works for you too. Maybe it depends on stty.


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In answer to your main question : yes, from within a bash shell it is possible to recognise the size of a terminal window. Command stty is one way to determine this from any shell. $ stty -a|head -1 speed 38400 baud; rows 49; columns 90; line = 0; $ stty size 49 90 $


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Are the scripts executable and in your $PATH? You probably need gnome-terminal -e ./window1.sh & Also, if the scripts are similar, write it once and pass a parameter as an argument: gnome-terminal -e ./window.sh 1 & gnome-terminal -e ./window.sh 2 & "$@" expands to the command line args, each quoted separately. "$1" is the first arg, etc. ...


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Run the script on its own. ./window1.sh You will get this output. window press any key to continue./window1.sh: 3: read: arg count This is because read is a bash command, but not a sh command.



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