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1

Create a functon in ~/.bashrc set-title(){ ORIG=$PS1 TITLE="\e]2;$@\a" PS1=${ORIG}${TITLE} } Then use your new command to set the terminal title. It works with spaces in the name too set-title my new tab title


1

From some quick searching, it doesn't look like there is a way to get gnome to display the dimensions. You can run these commands inside the terminal window to get the lines and columns respectively: tput lines tput cols


0

After spending a descent amount of time looking around, I finally found two solutions starting with the best one mentioned first. I present them for the sake of completeness: One has to make sure to have the following line in the terminator configuration file: always_split_with_profile = True under the [global_config] section. The same issue was brought up ...


10

Terminal parameters are stored as $LINES and $COLUMNS variables. Additionally you can use special term-operation programm, for example tput: tput lines # outputs the number of lines of the present terminal window. tput cols # outputs the number of columns of the present terminal window.


6

This command should give you the number of lines on the terminal: stty size | cut '-d ' -f1 Some systems might not implement stty size so you might need something like this instead: stty -a | tr \; \\012 | grep rows | tr -d ' rows'


2

Short answer: you can't, at least not exactly the way you want. More useful answer: you can achieve what you want by piping the output to something like more or less , for example : locate linux | less This will pause the output scroll at the end of each page, where the page length is defined as the terminal height.


0

If you want terminal to stay opened after command execution then just run some shell in it, e.g.: gnome-terminal -x bash -c 'test; bash'


0

Put your app in a script and add read at the end. test.sh: #!/bin/sh ./test read don't forget to add executable permission to your script



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