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Change the permissions in fstab back to the default. As a normal user: sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade && sudo apt-get install build-essential module-assistant sudo m-a prepare Mount the Guest Additions CD using the VirtualBox Menu (sudo mount /media/cdrom) sudo sh /media/cdrom/VBoxLinuxAdditions.run If the error you noted ...


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According to a comment on Fedora, Adding ~/.local/bin to default PATH, this was a Fedora-specific change in the bash configuration, a few years ago. The change was made in the RPM (not upstream), and undocumented.


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This worked for me in your ~/.xinitrc replace exec gnome-session with exec dbus-launch --exit-with-session gnome-session Source: https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=203918


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Put the commands you want to run in individual scripts and then create keyboard shortcuts to run the scripts. The clipboard formatting example would look like this. #!/bin/bash xsel -b|xsel -bi If you save that file in ~/scripts/strip-format.sh you'll need to give it executable permissions with chmod +x ~/scripts/strip-format.sh and then add your custom ...


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You could make aliases for these instead of keyboard shortcuts. On the assumption that you are using the default shell (bash), edit your ~/.bash_profile and add these lines: alias sf='xsel -b | xsel -bi' alias vpn='expressvpn connect' where you can change the names from 'sf' and 'vpn' to whatever you want. Run . ~/.bash_profile in a terminal window (or ...


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Perhaps you cannot have what you are asking. From the terminal's standpoint: screen is a full-screen (no pun) application just like vi or less. the terminal implements scrolling and an alternate screen. when the terminal is in alternate-screen mode, it does not add to its scrollback area as it would in normal mode. in gnome-terminal (and perhaps some ...


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Append set-title function to ~/.bashrc: function set-title() { if [[ -z "$ORIG" ]]; then ORIG=$PS1 fi TITLE="\[\e]2;$@\a\]" PS1=${ORIG}${TITLE} } Install expect, if you don't have it: sudo apt-get install expect Create ProductionServer.sh with content: #!/usr/bin/env expect spawn bash expect -re $ {send -- "set-title \"Production ...


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It is not hardcoded (though some of the programs you run inside the terminal may be). Checking Ubuntu 13.04, its version of gnome-terminal is 3.61, which supports the dialog for modifying keyboard shortcuts: You reach that by going to the Edit menu, and selecting "Keyboard Shortcuts...". In the dialog, you can modify any entry by clicking on it (on the ...


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That is not "ASCII", but appears to be ISO-8859-1 (also referred to as Latin-1). You can either set your locale to something with that encoding, e.g., en_US (depending on what your locale support is), or convert the file into UTF-8 You can use iconv to do this conversion, e.g., one of these: iconv -f ISO-8859-1 -t UTF-8 oldfile > newfile iconv -t ...


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Forget quoting and put the text in an environment variable. Use -x to launch a shell. Don't craft code for $SHELL: you don't know what syntax it understands. Run code in sh, and call $SHELL to invoke an interactive shell. message='HelloWorld' gnome-terminal -x sh -c 'printf %s\\n "$message"; unset message; exec "$SHELL"'



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