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3

COLUMNS is a variable set by bash, and is not meant to be a variable you set manually. It's also not exported by default, so applications launched by the shell don't even see it. What is it for then? It contains your terminal emulator's width in characters. It's vertical equivalent is LINES. They are both used by the select shell built-in. The select ...


1

$COLUMNS gives the terminal width. Concerning the use with dpkg -l, you should look at the longest line (i.e. do not use grep as it will probably discard this line). And of course, if $COLUMNS is too small, such as 1 or 13, one can do nothing for you. EDIT: if the dpkg -l output is not connected to a terminal, e.g. when piping to grep, dpkg uses column ...


1

Go to Keyboard window and in the Custom Shortcut part the command is: gksu gnome-terminal


0

Your question has way too much unnecessary information, but I'll answer anyway. Your best option is to open the menu in your menu editor(depends on what desktop enviroment you're using as to how you do it), when in the menu editor just mark the "Root Terminal" entry and figure out which command is used and then set that to your keyboard combo.


4

It has nothing to do with the command line, it's just a Gnome Terminal application shortcut. It won't happen in eg Xterm.


3

These are shortcuts for changing the font size in gnome-terminal. You can see them in the View menu and change them in the Edit → Keybord shortcuts… menu.


4

It's a somewhat standard keyboard shortcut (it works in Konsole, too). It's simply bound to reduce font size (and simmetrically, Ctrl+ to increase font size). You can easily disable/modify by going to the shortcuts preferences.



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