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0

With luck, you can fix this with the following command: git reset --hard ORIG_HEAD When potential dangerous changes commence, git stashes your current state in ORIG_HEAD. With it you can undo a merge or rebase. Git Manual: Undoing a Merge


-1

Looks like someone ran git push --force on this repo, and you pulled down those changes. Try cloning the repo fresh, that should get you back into a clean working state again.


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Unquoted variables and command substitutions like $i or $(git …) apply the split+glob operator to the string result. That is: Build a string containing the value of the variable or the output of the command (minus final newlines in the latter case). Split the string into separate fields according to the value of IFS. Interpret each field as a wildcard ...


0

Text streams like this should be read using a while loop rather than for, which is probably causing the issue (although I cannot reproduce it). A simple way to do this: git branch | while IFS= read -r line do echo "${line:2}" done Comparison: $ cd -- "$(mktemp -d)" $ git init Initialized empty Git repository in /tmp/tmp.MJFmu7q7EH/.git/ $ touch ...


1

In addition to jasonwryans excellent answer: Most AUR helpers have a flag to update development packages, even if their pkgver hasn't changed in the AUR. For pacaur, that flag is called --devel which can be used in conjunction with its update operations. It will cause pacaur to rebuild development package, but only if their source is newer than that of the ...


3

Previously, VCS PKGBUILDS included a more transparent function for cloning the git repository identified in the source array, so it was a lot more obvious how they worked. Changes to the way makepkg handles these packages, documented by one of the pacman developers here, made the overall process a lot simpler. Esentially, the same thing still happens: the ...


1

The program etckeeper does manage /etc in git, you just need to change the default vcs backend from bzr to git in /etc/etckeeper/etckeeper.conf. It is installed by default in Ubuntu Linux, and handles the common cases of when to commit automatically. It commits before installing packages in case there are uncomitted manual changes, and after installing.



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