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2

Tree supports the -I flag. -I pattern Do not list those files that match the wild-card pattern. For example, tree -I "$( tr '\n' '\|' < $( git config --get core.excludesfile ) )" /foo For convenience you could put this into a function: function gtree { git_ignore_file=$( git config --get core.excludesfile ) if [[ -f ${...


2

git pull is used for updating existing repository. If you want to download the content of the new repository, there is git clone command: $ git clone https://gist.github.com/sergeykish/650839 Cloning into '650839'... remote: Counting objects: 15, done. remote: Total 15 (delta 0), reused 0 (delta 0), pack-reused 15 Unpacking objects: 100% (15/15), done. ...


0

What Svetlin Tonchev suggested would work out of the box only if OP was using Ubuntu, which isn't the case here. However, when running add-apt-repository the added source will depend on the name of your OS. For example, if you go to /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ you might find a file called git-core-ppa-jessie.list (or similar) containing the following lines: ...


0

The solution I use is to run the command as the user that has the permissions you want to keep: sudo -u user command This keeps the permissions from changing. I use it when updating git repositories on my VPS, while keeping the file permissions set to the webserver user. See also the same question here.


2

If you were getting this error on an install operation then a likely cause would be that your local database of available packages doesn't match what's available on the server, so APT is requesting package versions that don't exist anymore. The fix in that case is to run apt-get update to update the local availability database. However I don't see how this ...


1

I was wrong about OpenCSW. I just missed adding the git executable to the path. This is still unsupported per their description but it seems to still work. https://www.opencsw.org/packages/git/ Follow the steps listed here and then git should be located here: /opt/csw/libexec/git-core/git


0

I have not been able to identify the cause of this problem, but here is a solution: Simply clone the repository to a new copy: git clone old-repo new-repo cd old-repo git remote get-url origin # Copy this URL cd ../new-repo git remote set-url [paste URL from old-repo] That is, I simple clone a new copy of the repository and give its 'origin' remote the ...


0

Somehow it was related to the id_rsa.pub file. For the root user, it didn't make a problem, but for sudo through root, it apparently does not work. Perhaps it is a particular case with root that blocks this or perhaps it needs another special permission, other than the recommended ones or group configuration. The "solution" was to just remove the public ...


4

Like @Serge pointed out in a comment, this line debug1: Offering RSA public key: /root/.ssh/id_rsa in your ssh -v output tells you that ssh tried to authenticate with the public key in root's home directory (/root) and not your own user directory (/home/yourusername). This leaves you with three options. You can either run ssh with the -i option to ...


-2

I think you need to check sudoer file and add the user through root privileges. The sudoers file located at: /etc/sudoers(depends on linux base), contains the rules that users must follow when using the sudo command. Read out for suoders for you version of Linux/Unix. you will get lot of material on web which definitely help you out https://www.garron....



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