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You could add (or update) a README file in your new branch, then commit with a comment. At that point, you should be able to push the new branch. Providing some detail in the README about the origin of the code (in P4) may be useful if future pulls/pushes/merges to/from the external repo are needed.


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There is a tool: hub hub is a command line tool that wraps git in order to extend it with extra features and commands that make working with GitHub easier Installation Aliasing Now you can: # cd to a cloned repo with uncommited changes git checkout -b feature git commit -am 'done with feature' git fork git push YOUR_USER feature # git pull-request ...


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Look at the various scenarios listed in the book for rewriting history: https://git-scm.com/book/en/v2/Git-Tools-Rewriting-History If you need more assistance, please write what you wish to achieve.


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I have no idea what the best approach is and elegance is certainly in the eye of the beholder, but I use the following for my dotfiles: A ~/.dotfiles directory that contains all of the dotfiles themselves. These are all managed in a git repo. A script, also in ~/.dotfiles that creates the required links into my home directory. I don't have any dotfiles in ...


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Try sshrc. Install sshrc on your local machine. Add the following line to ~/.sshrc on your local machine: cp "$SSHHOME/.sshrc.d/.gitconfig" ~/.gitconfig Create ~/.sshrc.d on your local machine: mkdir ~/.sshrc.d Create a symlink: ln -s ~/.gitconfig ~/.sshrc.d/.gitconfig And try sshrc me@myserver See also: Specializing .sshrc to individual servers ...


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Unless I've misunderstood your question, there are a good number of ways to approach this, but what you decide will depend on the preferences of your team so without a working example I'll just be fairly general... I'll mention right now that Git allows commands to be aliased and added onto internally to allow for something like this to be seamless if you ...


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Git grep is not using the GREP_COLORS environment variable. Instead you should add custom entries in you ~/.gitconfig For example: [color "grep"] linenumber = yellow bold match = red filename = magenta


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Some firewall between you and the target site is blocking TCP connections to port 22, either by blocking outgoing packets or by blocking the response. You can locate the firewall by running tcptraceroute github.com 22. If the firewall is beyond your control (e.g. on your ISP's equipment), there's nothing you can do without outside help. If your ISP is ...


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As previously stated, this can be done with git describe. In your particular case, however, you may find it more convenient to run git name-rev --tags --name-only <SHA>, which outputs exactly what you want. See git-name-rev(1).


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A tree is a hierarchical collection of files and directories, not tied to any particular point in history. For example, if you create a file and then later delete the file (with no other intervening commits), you will end up with the same tree you started with. A commit is a point in the history of your project. A commit specifies a tree, but also ...


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Generally speaking, when you run a recursive diff between two directories, for each file diff includes a diff command showing you what it is doing for each file. For example: $ diff -ru a b diff -ru a/file b/file --- a/file 2015-07-17 01:06:14.078875805 -0700 +++ b/file 2015-07-17 01:06:21.969077076 -0700 @@ -1 +1 @@ -hello +goodbye Git wants to ...


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Use process substitution on bash: diff -ywB --suppress-common-lines <(git branch --merged prod-server) <(git branch --merged test-server)


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You can get it with svn from https:/github.com/GNOME (svn checkout URL is available on the right side of the page). So, to get just the Adwaita sub-directory simply run: svn checkout https://github.com/GNOME/gtk/trunk/gtk/theme/Adwaita


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It's because Git records which commit (not a branch or a tag, exactly one commit represented in SHA-1 hash) should be checked out for each submodule. If you change something in submodule dir, Git will detect it and urge you to commit those changes in the top-level repoisitory. Run git diff in the top-level repository to show what has actually changed Git ...



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