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equery depgraph <atom> outputs all the required dependencies for atom. Use case: pre-install considerations Where is software based on Is it worth the extra amount of packages? Prevent a whole tree of additional dependencies by USE flag tuning Example: qt and kde libraries can be pulled in while you are gnome user. You may be able to prevent it ...


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As jimmij pointed out, you can select a particular version by prefixing the package atom with an equals ('=') sign. But you can also tell emerge which overlay to use. I we assume that there exists an ebuild for x11-libs/bamf-0.5.0 in two or more overlays, you could select an particular overlay by appending ::<overlayName> to the end of the package ...


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You need to add = at the beginning of the package name, so try emerge -a =x11-libs/bamf-0.5.0 You can also add a line to /etc/portage/package.mask in order to prevent emerge installing higher version: >x11-libs/bamf-0.5.0


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Although the question was asked 27 days ago, maybe someone is still interested in an answer: equery (included in app-portage/gentoolkit) can be used to get the reason why a package (PKG) was masked: equery list --portage-tree --mask-reason PKG For more information on the available options and how to read the output just have a look at the man page of ...


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You could switch to Gentoo and use the bindist use flag globally. This will download binary files when available to avoid compiling everything. Then you could remove the flag for individual packages that you would like optimized.


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You should use the latest version 13 of the desktop profile. This will allow you to install a windows manager without having to install gnome or kde.


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Here is how I recently did it, and I am quite happy with this approach now. This is for Ubuntu 12.04 + gentoo, but I guess any distro, which allows to install udev and autofs should work. Prerequisites: You have to have installed udev + autofs. Step 1) Create the following "/etc/udev/rules.d/90-usbsd-auto.rules" file (of course you might use any name as ...


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You know you can convert the package.* files in directories, right? Then you can organize your atoms in several files, eg, in my system I got the following (well, not really, i am not at my laptop now. But you het the idea): /etc/portage/package.keywords: package.keywords qt5.keywords xfce.keywords /etc/portage/package.use: package.use qt5.use ...


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AFAIK there is no command. Checking /var/lib/portage/world_sets reveals the truth :) # cat /var/lib/portage/world_sets @qt5-addons @qt5-essentials After removing, full update (@world) doesn't complain anymore. Next time check first man emerge, sets are mentioned at start: set A set is a convenient shorthand for a large group of packages. Three sets ...


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Do you happen to have a script that queries xrandr? I was noticing freezes every 3 seconds and then I remembered I had a script that would call xrandr every 3 seconds to check if an external monitor had been plugged in (and if so, switch to it.) I don't know why querying xrandr does this, but hey.


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This problem might be caused by an incorrect sizing of the maximum size of the connection tracking table and the hash table. The Linux kernel tries to allocate contiguous pages to track the connection tables for the iptables nf_conntrack module. As you don't have enough physical memory, conntrack fails back to vmalloc. This table is not dynamically created ...


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Ran out of space as a comment.. For backspace, stty erase '^?' should get you what you want. When you say CTRL commands aren't working, do you mean CTRL+C? If so, what about stty intr ^C? Can you still switch terminals with CTRL+ALT+F#? In any case, it may be helpful to paste the output of stty -a The following link should be helpful when it comes to stty ...


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If you do not want to use a display manger and just have X start after you log in, I believe this is what you're looking for. You can modify your .xinitrc to launch the terminal (here I assume xterm, but most others should be similar): xterm -e /bin/bash -c "sudo tmux" And then run startxfce4 from .bashrc when ever you are on specific tty. tty2 ...


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/boot/efi must be a FAT32 "efi system partition" (ESP), see also http://www.rodsbooks.com/efi-bootloaders/principles.html


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I found a solution : I picked my preferred wallpaper and copied in the directory provided by aliceinwire. sudo cp your-wallpaper.jpg /usr/share/backgrounds/lightdm.jpg Hope this helps


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lspci isn't found because it isn't on an ordinary user's command search path. Commands that can only rarely or never be used effectively by non-root users are placed in one of the directories /sbin, /usr/sbin or /usr/local/sbin, which are in root's command search path but not on other users'. You can configure what bash does when a command is not found by ...


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The directory containing lspci is likely not in your PATH. You can find its location using sudo -i which lspci and add the directory to your path. The likely locations are /sbin or /usr/sbin To add them you your current PATH, you can run (in a Bourne-based shell) export PATH="$PATH:/usr/sbin:/sbin" To make the change permanent, add the export command to ...


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Can you elaborate on what your end goal is? It seems like you have an odd need and an even more curious need of a "widescale solution." Perhaps you're trying to streamline some mini-PC installation process? Can you chroot into your sdb OS (maybe with qemu if a different architecture)? If so, that would be the best option. Otherwise, you can look at the ...


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It is important to note that make.conf is not reliable at all, to check how a package is compiled. In fact, it is just one of the supplementary config files in a whole list. From the man make.conf: USE_ORDER = "env:pkg:conf:defaults:pkginternal:repo:env.d" Determines the precedence of layers in the incremental stacking of the USE variable. Precedence ...



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