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You can check the configuration file in /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections directly. System wide connections don't have permissions= line in the [connection] section. Also, NetworkManager is monitoring available connections via wpa_supplicant which triggers network scanning. You normally only connect to networks that are public, i.e. not hidden. If your ...


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I've done this already: Complete the Handbook from Chapter 1 to the End of Chapter 6. On Another machine, go here to the Gentoo Systemd Wiki Combine Handbook Chapter 7 with Wiki Section 1 Complete Handbook Chapter 7, by compiling the kernel. There is no need to remove openrc, as you need a fallback if something fails, and using a systemd profile assumes ...


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If you have all at one partition then mount it at / and don't mount anything at /boot. Just be sure that you have installed grub and put kernel stuff to /boot directory. So if you have configured everything correctly then simply remove first line from your fstab: /dev/sda6 / ext3 noatime 0 1 /dev/SWAP none swap ...


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It depends at which stage crash takes place. It can be kernel problem, eg. wrong/conflicted parameters passed to it as an options in the grub config, or (most probable) problems with missed or wrongly configured system packages. It also depends which init system do you use. If it is openrc then first step is to check /var/log/messages for errors, if you use ...


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I use app-portage/elogviewer. It has a GUI in which you can sort, filter and flag the messages. There is also a curses based tool called app-portage/elogv in case you want to stay on the command line. Note that in both cases you need to enable and select elogs in your make.conf. You get all the information with: PORTAGE_ELOG_SYSTEM="save" ...


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You can simply run a cron by the following tutorial http://findoutanswer.com/48/please-provide-some-linux-cron-job-examples?show=48#q48



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