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boot from rescue CD/USB. Then chroot to your installation, then run grub2-install /dev/sda grub2-mkconfig /boot/grub2/grub.cfg


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You'll run your things with ssh -X (assuming your laptop runs a Linux with some X11 desktop) and you would only install the packages of client applications, e.g. sudo aptitude install gedit gnome-terminal emacs24 xterm I forgot the package manager on Gentoo, so use pacman instead of aptitude this will pull the required client libraries (e.g. GTK, Xlib, ...


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I can't provide the information you requested in a comment, so here goes: Hardware $ sudo lshw -C system bedroom-gentoo description: Desktop Computer product: M68M-S2P () vendor: Gigabyte Technology Co., Ltd. width: 64 bits capabilities: smbios-2.4 dmi-2.4 vsyscall32 configuration: boot=normal chassis=desktop ...


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Because the Gentoo developer community thinks it's no problem installing those files unconditionally, as long as the systemd dependency is not pulled in. And you can prevent that with INSTALL_MASK=/usr/lib/systemd in your make.conf (see man 5 make.conf).


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Disabled compile time option means the code isn't compiled. Unloading a module means, that the code has been compiled into a module, but is not loaded in memory and thus is not run. Be aware, that sometimes the modules may be loaded automatically, so if you need to disable certain functionality, the safe option is to disable it at compile time or ...


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IUSE is needed only if you actually reference that USE flag in the ebuild. In the few ebuilds I checked they don't use the systemd USE flag and just blindly install systemd service definitions in /usr/lib/systemd/system/, just as they blindly install the OpenRC init scripts without checking for the openrc USE flag. The systemd (and openrc) USE flags are ...


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The latter (fsck.mode=force) is the right approach. However, to fsck a root, you must either: have a systemd-controlled initramfs (so that it could parse fsck.mode=force) with the corresponding fsck binary built in; have an initramfs which mounts rootfs read-only (so that systemd, started from rootfs, still can check it — checking a read-write mounted ...



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