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# yum provides '*bin/g++' ... gcc-c++-4.4.7-4.el6.i686 : C++ support for GCC Repo : sl Matched from: Filename : /usr/bin/g++ tells us that the gcc-c++ package has g++, so you'll need to run: yum install gcc-c++


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You can use the command command-not-found to search for the package of g++ and how to install it. On my debian machine, I get this result: $ command-not-found g++ The program 'g++' is currently not installed. You can install it by typing: apt-get install g++ tcsh: command not found $ So, on my computer, g++ is in the package g++ and not in the package ...


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or is it already installed Looks like it is not; if it were g++ would be available. Try: yum search ++ | grep ^g The package is likely called gcc-c++, but this should catch it just in case it is, e.g., just g++. Do not use one of the packages with "cross" in the description (e.g., "Cross-build binary for ....").


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The correct virtual link is: ln -s /tools/lib/crt*.o /tools/lib/gcc/i686-lfs-linux-gnu/4.8.2/


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You've combined together several different (but related) questions. A few of them aren't really on-topic here (e.g., coding standards), so I'm going to ignore those. I'm going to start with if the kernel is "technically incorrect C code". I'm starting here because the answer explains the special position a kernel occupies, which is critical to understanding ...


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From the Gentoo GCC Optimization Wiki Section 2.3: The -O Flag -O Next up is the -O variable. This controls the overall level of optimization. This makes the code compilation take somewhat more time, and can take up much more memory, especially as you increase the level of optimization. There are seven -O settings: -O0, -O1, -O2, -O3, -Os, -Og, ...



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