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There can be transient network errors between you and the pkg repo server which end up with you being unable to contact the repo server. A better place to ask this particular question would be the Oracle forums related to Solaris 11. (Try https://community.oracle.com/community/developer/english/server_%26_storage_systems/solaris/solaris_11 to start with). ...


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The easiest method by far is to make use of a binary build that's provided through a YUM repository. One such option would be to use the hop5.inrepository. Specifically this page: gcc - Various compilers (C, C++, Objective-C, Java, ...). They're providing 4.8.2 which should work with CentOS 6.3 or 6.4. You might want to do an update prior: $ sudo yum ...


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What you could do is download Ubuntu .iso on your computer, then use SFTP (FTP via SSH) to upload .iso file to your server. On your server you can mount the .iso file like this: mkdir /mnt/ubuntu_iso mount -o loop /path/to/file.iso /mnt/ubuntu_iso Now edit /etc/apt/sources.list file and comment out everything that is not cd-rom related. Then run ...


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Two problems: Your makefile is set up to use the Solaris C compiler's options, but you're using gcc. You don't say how your makefile was generated, but replacing CFLAGS with something more appropriate will help. If you used a configure script to generate your makefile then I'm a bit confused, as doing CC=gcc ./configure should be enough to do the right ...


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You should check out the Arch Linux ARM Rollback Machine. There's the gcc 4.7.2 packages there.


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If you only want to compile programs that run on their own on a processor (“bare metal” system), then all that matters is to have a compiler that produces instructions for that particular processor. “For ARM” is almost enough information, but not quite: you would also need to specify the version of the instruction set. Most ARM processors today are based on ...



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