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11

A better solution might be to add the user to the fuse group, i.e.: addgroup <username> fuse


8

It's the way fuse works. If you want to allow access to root or others users, you have to add: user_allow_other in /etc/fuse.conf and mount your fuse filesystem with allow_other or allow_root as options.


7

It depends on your windowing environment (GNOME/KDE/etc.) but in GNOME, for example, you'll see daemons running called, gvfs-*-volume-monitor. These daemons are responsible for mounting devices when running the desktop environment, they have nothing to do with /etc/fstab, and operate completely independently. As far as a config file, there are some files ...


7

Unix filesystems are traditionally implemented in the kernel. FUSE allows filesystems to be implemented by a user program. In-kernel filesystems are better suited for main filesystems for programs and data: They can be used on boot media (the program implementing a FUSE filesystem has to be loaded from somewhere). They're more robust, in that they won't ...


7

A classic case of RTFM (all of it!). The -T option to GNU tar will read the files to be archived from another file (in my case, /dev/stdin, you can also use -), and there's even a --remove-files option: alias magic_otf_compressor='tar --create -T - --remove-files -O | pixz' (using the parallel version of xz for compression, but you can use your preferred ...


6

If read-only access is acceptable, then SquashFS is a good choice. However, it sounds like you want to be able to do in place updating as well. Btrfs may be an option for you. It is still considered somewhat experimental, but it does support transparent file compression, and is available to try in most distros. The other approach is to do this in ...


6

The simple answer is they cheat. They don't use the fstab. They typically use a udev hook to catch insertion events, mount the disk manually as root, which may be passed to dbus to notify your file manager that you have a new disk or they might use suid utilities instead of dbus for unmounting. Unfortunately there are no standard configuration options for ...


5

Filesystems where you can't change the date of a symlink are common. This in itself is not a bug of bindfs or sshfs. Rsync is designed to cope with that. It ignores failures to change the time and other metadata of symbolic links if the underlying filesystem doesn't support it. Under Linux, rsync calls utimensat with the AT_SYMLINK_NOFOLLOW flag to change ...


5

I'm not positive if you mean real, on-disk filesystems or any filesystem. I've never seen a normal filesystem use FUSE, although I suppose it's possible; the main benefit of FUSE is it lets you present something to applications (or the user) that looks like a filesystem, but really just calls functions within your application when the user tries to do things ...


4

I poked through Config.cpp, the file responsible for parsing the configuration. The example configuration actually does a pretty good job of capturing the available options -- there aren't very many When I refer to "the example output" below, I'm talking about this line (pulled at random from the sample page): 17:29:35 (src/loggedfs.cpp:136) getattr /var/ ...


4

I suppose (but not tried) that the fuse option -o allow_other, also shown in the example in the unionfs-fuse's man page, could be of help. Edit Try this sudo mount -t aufs -o br:/mnt/disk1-pool=RW:/mnt/disk3-pool=RW \ none /mnt/union-pool that seems to work also without aufs-tools package.


4

This is my understanding of the situation, but I'm not an expert so it is less technical than the other answers. This is what I understand after using these systems for many years, I have not studied them in any detail. There are three main players here and between them they manage the mounts: FUSE: This is at the center of everything, as described in its ...


4

PolicyKit (or Polkit) is an application-level toolkit for defining and handling the policy that allows unprivileged processes to speak to privileged processes. It is a framework for centralizing the decision making process with respect to granting access to privileged operations (like calling the Mount() method) for unprivileged (desktop) applications. An ...


3

The easiest way to create a "protected execution environment" is to just execute as an unprivileged user. The process can then only make changes to things the user has permission to change, which if you create a user specifically for secure testing, will be essentially nothing. Adding and deleting users is a single command. The only reason this method ...


3

One common element you are looking for is FUSE, GNOME's gvfs, e.g., uses that under the hood.1 This is the interface with the kernel, and I believe it is common to all unprivileged (auto)mounting systems on linux [but see comments]. Individual DE's would not create their own version of this since that would require kernel patching. That homepage link is ...


3

You dont have to do anything. The file is read whenever you try to mount something.


3

It's possible to do with fuse, but would probably be cleaner with custom tools. Solution With apt-get-able tools the following kludge is possible: mkdir mnt xmount --in dd --out vdi disk.img mnt mkdir mnt2 vdfuse -f mnt/disk.vdi mkdir mnt3 fuseext2 -o "rw" mnt2/Partition1 mnt3 Explanation The basic idea is that fuse can be used to separate a full ...


3

FUSE Filesystem 4 Dropbox can be found here: https://github.com/realriot/ff4d


3

Given the message failed to open /etc/fuse.conf: Permission denied, I suggest chmod a+r /etc/fuse.conf


3

I think that behind your description, there is a misconception. The unencrypted data is not stored on the disk at any point. When you write to a file in the encfs filesystem, the write instruction goes to the encfs process; the encfs process encrypts the data (in memory) and writes the ciphertext to a file. The file names, as well as the file contents, are ...


3

1) No. It translates blocks of the file through an encryption algorithm. Moving blocks around would imply that you could see a bits of the file, just out of order. This is not the case. There isnt any bits of the original file that would be viewable looking at the encrypted version. 2) Its not a true filesystem because it doesnt handle actual storage of the ...


3

The whole idea behind "mounting" something into the filesystem is that you can use the standard interface (API) that you're used to when dealing with the mounted entity. So if it's a website, FTP, SSH session, etc. that is mounted via FUSE, you interact with it using the standard command cd, ls, etc. Example - FUSE/sshfs If you want to remotely mount ...


3

Nautilus uses GVFS to mount networked filesystems. Unlike its predecessor GnomeVFS, GVFS includes a FUSE bridge so that non GVFS-aware applications can still access GVFS data. That means that there are two ways to do this: using the FUSE bridge, or using the native GVFS tools. Using the FUSE bridge According to man gvfsd-fuse, the GVFS daemon will mount ...


2

FUSE isn't really a file system per se but code that allows file systems to be implemented as processes instead of kernel modules. One of the most useful benefit of FUSE is to allow GPL code to "mix" with non GPL one. For example, Gnu/Linux and ZFS http://zfs-fuse.net/ or NTFS-3G on many OSes like OpenSolaris and *BSD ...


2

This bug is now fixed in bindfs version 1.12.3. Gilles's answer explains the bug superbly.


2

Try chucking in the two following options -o idmap=user,uid=<YOUR UID>


2

$ apt-cache search rdiff fuse rdiff-backup-fs - Fuse filesystem for accessing rdiff-backup archives (untested). http://code.google.com/p/rdiff-backup-fs/


2

One way to do this would be to make each file an LVM physical volume, and join those physical volumes in a volume group and make an LVM logical volume using that space. But it's cumbersome: you need to associate the file with a loop device. dd if=/dev/zero of=0.file bs=1024k count=4 losetup /dev/loop0 0.file pvcreate /dev/loop0 # … repeat for all parts … ...


2

I found that the problem is sshfs trying to prevent other users (even root) from accessing my remote filesystem. Furthemore, accessing character devices (such as /dev/null) is problematic, and probably not what you want, because I guess that for example piping to /dev/null would effectively send bytes over the network. This is what I use now: mkdir ...


1

The canonicalization refers to the device path. So you say: I was just able to mount USB Flash Drives with and without this option, with the exact same output in /etc/mtab But did you try this? cd /dev mount --no-canonicalize sdb1 /mnt/usb The listing in mtab will start with just "sdb1". Without --no-canonicalize, it would be /dev/sdb1. Also: ln ...



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