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0

To summarize the steps taken to get to the answer: According to the output given the NFS server does not like NFSv4 nor UDP. To see the capabilities of the NFS server you can use rpcinfo 10.0.0.100 (you might extend the command to filter for nfs by: |egrep "service|nfs") Apparently the only version supported by the server is version 2: rpcinfo 10.0.0.100 ...


-1

try to use this option .... nfs rsize=8192,wsize=8192,timeo=14,intr 0 0


3

I would gate access to the filesystem through a directory that contains the mount point. As root: mkdir -p /media/group1only/workspace chgrp group1 /media/group1only chmod 750 /media/group1only This is full access to root and read+execute access for members of group1. Don't give them write access here, since if they accidentally rename the workspace ...


1

For example, assuming the filesystem on the disk supports ACL's, and using the hypothetical user, myusername, and the hypothetical group for accessing the disk, diskusers, something like the following could be done. $ indicated a command executed as a regular user; # indicates a command executed as the user, root. Create a group to which a user may belong ...


2

If the filesystem type is one that doesn't have permissions, such as FAT, you can add umask, gid and uid to the fstab options. For example: /dev/sdb1 /media/workspace auto defaults,uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=022 0 1 uid=1000 is the user id. gid=1000 is the group id. umask=022 this will set permissions so that the owner has read, write, execute. Group and ...


0

Whenever I run into issues mounting CIFS shares I generally turn debugging on. See: https://wiki.samba.org/index.php/LinuxCIFS_troubleshooting One thing I ran into recently is that actual Windows CIFS shares usually do not require the domain name. However, on a samba file share I have that authenticates (using kerberos) against a domain control you must ...


1

Best way for non-user-name password is : sec=none Above configuration is mount option of mount.cifs


1

Providing option guest should make it not ask for a password, but it obviously won't work if a password is needed. If a password is needed you can pass it as an option (username=x,password=y), or (better) pass a file with the credentials (username, domain, password) as an option (credentials=/etc/cifs_mountpoint.cred). man mount.cifs for more details. You ...


2

You can see the UUIDs for the various different components (physical disk, RAID, etc.) by running blkid Here is a sample from one of my systems: /dev/sda3: UUID="NAzDnw-zu08-iSt9-v76l-njNc-NElx-8RFzVg" TYPE="LVM2_member" /dev/sdc3: UUID="215b625b-8531-26ed-c610-01f443697250" UUID_SUB="087e72db-ff75-bcbe-5b41-8f79a6bb54f5" LABEL="server:3" ...


2

The UUID you use in the /etc/fstab is for identifying the filesystem on the raid (it was created when you formatted your raid). The UUID you see in the /etc/mdadm.conf is on every device (disc/partition) that is part of a particular raid to identify it, for mdadm that these devices belong to a particular raid. That UUID is created when the RAID is created, ...



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