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In the future to prevent this issue I highly recommend using partition UUIDs (as opposed to /dev/sdX naming) in your fstab. It's super easy to do and will make your life easier, especially for automounting any drives that are likely to change location or might simply be plugged/detected in a different order. https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/fstab#UUIDs ...


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All my fault. I'm the idiot here.. plugged in another 1tb hdd and it just so happens to be on a lower numbered sata port than the ssd so it took sdc and pushed the ssd to sdd. :(


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The way you have tried the mount command still uses the information from /etc/fstab. Try the following version and it should work independent of the contents of /etc/fstab: mount -o remount,rw /dev/sdb6 / Note: Instead of /dev/sdb6, use whatever device is valid for your drive.


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I would suggest using autofs to mount the NFS share. When your NFS server isn't reachable, it won't be able to automount the volume.


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It's good practice to avoid putting passwords directly in /etc/fstab (which is normally world-readable). Instead, put them into a file, and reference the file like: //w.x.y.z/Home$ /mnt/dir cifs credentials=/home/username/cifs.creds,sec=ntlmssp,file_mode=0700,dir_mode=0700 /home/username/cifs.creds is owned by a suitable user (either root, or a user that ...


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When you type the mount command, the part password='C' is first handled by the shell and becomes password=C before it gets to the mount command. This is not done with fstab entries, so you must remove the single quotes. If your password contains special characters you can replace them by their octal code, in particular \040 for space.


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Yes, you would replace the UUIDs as you think. The backup filesystems all have unique UUIDs, just as the active ones do, so the entries you have in the bootable backup will all be unique. The article you reference presents a simplified example, with expanding it to multiple fstab entries "left as an exercise for the reader".


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UUIDs solved my problem, which was the same as your problem. The following excerpt from the Arch Wiki is very helpful: If your machine has more than one SATA, SCSI or IDE disk controller, the order in which their corresponding device nodes are added is arbitrary. This may result in device names like /dev/sda and /dev/sdb switching around on each boot, ...


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The automounter was designed exactly for this kind of problem. It automatically mounts drives (local or remote) only when they are needed, and unmounted them when they are no longer being used. Install autofs on your NFS client and comment out (or remove) the entries in /etc/fstab. Edit /etc/auto.master and ensure that there is a line like this uncommented ...


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This is not something that can be solved with software alone. You need to buy a UPS with a USB or serial port that uses a protocol known to Network UPS Tools (aka NUT) Configure NUT to shut the system down cleanly 10 minutes before the UPS battery is exhausted when mains power gets cut off. If your power outages are typically short (say, half an hour or ...



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