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You can see the UUIDs for the various different components (physical disk, RAID, etc.) by running blkid Here is a sample from one of my systems: /dev/sda3: UUID="NAzDnw-zu08-iSt9-v76l-njNc-NElx-8RFzVg" TYPE="LVM2_member" /dev/sdc3: UUID="215b625b-8531-26ed-c610-01f443697250" UUID_SUB="087e72db-ff75-bcbe-5b41-8f79a6bb54f5" LABEL="server:3" ...


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The UUID you use in the /etc/fstab is for identifying the filesystem on the raid (it was created when you formatted your raid). The UUID you see in the /etc/mdadm.conf is on every device (disc/partition) that is part of a particular raid to identify it, for mdadm that these devices belong to a particular raid. That UUID is created when the RAID is created, ...


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You could use systemd's generator interface. Basically, it creates service files on the fly upon start or reload. We have a range of machines (called "dema" plus some number) in our cluster, which all export the same directory (their physical disk). I used the generator interface to create one .mount and one .automount file for each machine: #!/bin/sh ...


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Usually mount will print an error if there is one, otherwise it prints nothing. However if you type the mount command without any options it will print out a description of all mounted filesystems, including the mount options. Alternatively, you could try creating a setuid binary: [root@xxxlin01 jad87]# cp /usr/bin/passwd /home/jad87 [root@xxxlin01 ...


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A bind mount is equivalent to the original. There isn't one that's marked as the original and one that's marked as a copy. Bind mounts are like hard links in this respect, not like symbolic links. Since GNU coreutils 8.21 (if I read the changelog correctly), df strives to report each filesystem only once. Older versions included one entry per non-ignored ...


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Just change the parameter "defaults" by "_netdev", like this: UUID=723eb295-8fe0-409f-a75f-a26eede8904f /mnt/www ext3 _netdev 0 0 This way the mount point will be mounted only after the network start correctly.


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Try to use UUID instead of using device name. Because the name of this device (/dev/sda3) depends on the order in which it was detected while booting, and this order can change. Type this command "blkid" without quote, the shell will display all the devices with UUID. Refer below: [admin@localhost ~]$ blkid /dev/sda2: ...



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