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I wrote a wrapper for mount.posixovl that enables it to be used with fstab First, rename /sbin/mount.posixovl to something else, like /sbin/mount.posixovl.orig Finally, create a new file /sbin/mount.posixovl whith the following contents: #!/bin/bash # wrapper for mount.posixovl to conform with common mount syntax # with this wrapper posixovl can be used ...


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ln -s /home /media/volume Much safer option security-wise. Won't accidentally overwrite or delete important system files, for instance.


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Issuing grep -v root /proc/mounts > /etc/mtab; echo "/dev/sda9 / ext4 defaults 1 1" >> /etc/mtab fixed this problem. The startup issue was due to the mtab file having entries not properly removed during shutdown. Once the root filesystem was added to the mtab file (after boot), the shutdown occured properly and then startup also works fine. The ...


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I would advise leaving the mount in its default location and using a cross drive sym / soft link. Only change mount points from defaults if that's the only place you'll want to access the drive.


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To me systemd is a mess. I've had to resort to just adding scripts to /etc/rc.local (or equivalent on your OS). Just list all your mount points in the desired order. This will circumvent systemd's "intelligence".


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Although I don't think it's causing the problem here, your fstab entry is not 100% complete - you're missing the defaults in the mount options field. It should read: tmpfs /dev/shm tmpfs defaults,size=3g 0 0 That said, you will also need to change an init script for the fstab entry to take effect. See this bug report for more ...


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If you use systemd, there should be a way with a .mount unit and a mount script ! See man systedmd.unit and man systemd.mount ! But generally, you'd avoid using ntfs or any microsoft tech on linux because windows and linux just do not work the same way, and ntfs isn't as well supported as other filesystems. Plus, it's less performant


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You don't need to use ed unless you really want to. Once you're at a single-user prompt (just hit Enter at the Enter pathname of shell or RETURN for sh: prompt, do the following: Mount the root filesystem as read-write, then mount the /var and /usr filesystems (this will allow you to run vi or any other editor of your choice) # mount -uw / # mount /var # ...


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Exchange auto with sw in the fstab line. This tells the system to activate it using swapon after booting.



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