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This is the solution to my requirement below, "How do I make udev and fstab rules to differentiate between 2 identical SanDisk Cruzer 8 Gigabyte USB drives I purchased from BestBuy?" because identical USB drives have the same serial number. udev rule for assigning known symlinks for identical usb serial devices


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Yes , it is okay to modify Ubuntu Linux 16.04's /etc/fstab after one initializes it. I narrowed the cause of the problem where we modify /etc/fstab to sudo nano /etc/rc.local : e.g. Add these lines before the exit line: sleep 30 sudo mount -a exit exit 0 which were intended for the usb drive taking a long time to initiate , this ...


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I know you're runing SUSE, but this statement from the Ubuntu fstab wiki (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Fstab) may point you in the right direction : Removable devices such as flash drives can be added to fstab, but are typically mounted by gnome-volume-manager and are beyond the scope of this document. UPDATE: This might be of interest ...


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In my opinion its a bad practice to try to mount a backup filesystem at startup because if something going wrong (rm -rf / [enter] ops), the data on backup probably will be deleted together. So if you are using a script to do this, mount inside the script, or inside cron, and umount when done. With that your startup will not hangs anymore, and you will ...


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edit your /etc/fstab with this below line, you don't need to mention the address again. 192.168.178.4:/shares/OwnCloud /eStore nfs auto,_netdev,noatime,nolock,bg,intr,tcp,actimeo=1800 0 0 You can mention the credentials username=User,password=Pass also


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In the future to prevent this issue I highly recommend using partition UUIDs (as opposed to /dev/sdX naming) in your fstab. It's super easy to do and will make your life easier, especially for automounting any drives that are likely to change location or might simply be plugged/detected in a different order. https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/fstab#UUIDs ...


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All my fault. I'm the idiot here.. plugged in another 1tb hdd and it just so happens to be on a lower numbered sata port than the ssd so it took sdc and pushed the ssd to sdd. :(


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The way you have tried the mount command still uses the information from /etc/fstab. Try the following version and it should work independent of the contents of /etc/fstab: mount -o remount,rw /dev/sdb6 / Note: Instead of /dev/sdb6, use whatever device is valid for your drive.



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