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1

Try changing options => "-o loop", to options => "loop", The error shows mount -o -o loop so you'd want to get rid of one of the -o arguments


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From man fstab: Instead of giving the device explicitly, one may indicate the (ext2 or xfs) filesystem that is to be mounted by its UUID or volume label (cf. e2label(8) or xfs_admin(8)), writing LABEL= or UUID=, e.g., 'LABEL=Boot' or 'UUID=3e6be9de-8139-11d1-9106- a43f08d823a6'. This will make the system more robust: adding or removing a ...


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Unfortunately not. From man mount: the user must be member of the group of the special file. Note that it says special file and not mount point. If you run ls -l against your partitions you'll note that the group owner is disk. Therefore, make user1 a member of the disk group and he/she will be able to mount the partition as long as the group ...


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In the following, LABEL can be anything you want, /dev/sdb1 is the partition you create and choose to use on your new HDD and /var/www/myfiles is where your files are currently located. Alter these to suint your scenario. Partition the new HDD. You can have one partition that takes up the whole disk, or make a smaller partition which leaves you space on ...


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In the end, I've followed the advices of @frostschutz. I've used an encrypted LV as key ! lvcreate -L 4M -n LogVolKey vg cryptsetup luksFormat /dev/vg/LogVolKey (here we set the global passphrase) cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/vg/LogVolKey LogVolKeyDecrypted dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/mapper/LogVolKeyDecrypted cryptsetup luksFormat /dev/vg/LogVolXxx (here we ...


1

Don't know what OS you are using; but FreeBSD best-practice for this sort of thing is to use glabel to attach a label to the file system. Then the labels appear as /dev/ufs/[label] and you use that in your fstab specification. For example, if these are USB devices and they all autoconfig alternatively to /dev/ad0s0a, /dev/ad2s0a, and /dev/ad3s0a, you can ...


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As far as I'm aware mount doesn't scan past the first match. One thing you could do (should consider?) is to set-up udev rules that create the same symlink for all your NTFS disks under /dev ... then a single line in fstab will do for any/all of them.


4

async is the opposite of sync, which is rarely used. async is the default, you don't need to specify that explicitely. The option sync means that all changes to the according filesystem are immediately flushed to disk; the respective write operations are being waited for. For mechanical drives that means a huge slow down since the system has to move the ...



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