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I had exactly the same problem and the only thing that actually worked for me was: mount -t vfat /dev/sda2 /media/bigdrive -o rw,umask=0000 However, umask=000 and umask=0000 both worked for me. So after having set up your /etc/fstab, type the following commands (the first one unmount the drive, the second remounts it) : # umount /dev/sda2 # mount -a ...


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Change the line in /etc/fstab to: /dev/mapper/tmp /tmp ext4 noexec,nodev,nosuid 0 0 Then login and issue: chmod 1777 /dev/mapper/tmp The next reboot your /etc/fstab will suffice as chmod is permanent. You are trying to use an option designed for Windows mounts (fat, ntfs, etc) in a native Linux filesystem (ext4). Instead, you change the ...


3

I found the answer to my problem on stack overflow. In summary: According to this readme, systemd apparently requires the CONFIG_FHANDLE kernel option. After recompiling with this option enabled, mounting the partitions worked fine again. For people using make menuconfig, the option is under General setup:


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Method #1 Try a line like this in /etc/fstab: UUID=XX /home/user/extradrive ext3 rw,noauto,user,sync 0 2 Method #2 Examples are also shown using UID/GID too: UUID=XX /home/user/extradrive ext3 rw,exec,uid=userX,gid=grpX 0 2 NOTE You can also override when doing the actual manual mounting like this using mount + options: $ sudo ...


1

There are two things involved with accessing material on the drive once mounted: permissions on the mount directory permissions on the individual material With the first can restrict others to have access to any material on the drive by setting chmod o- ~/extradrive, or even everyone but yourself `(chmod go-rwx ~/extradrive) Ownership of individual ...


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This is documented (at least for gnome-shell/nautilus) in gvfs-udisks2-volume-monitor: The gvfs-udisks2-volume-monitor process is responsible for the disks, media, mounts and fstab entries shown in the desktop user interface. .......................................... A device is either mounted (in which case its directory is known) or it's not. If the ...


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Try sudo with the ls -l /dev/disk/by-uuid or blkid /dev/sdb1 I have a partitioned+formatted sdb1 also, for some reason it doesn't show up in the list unless I use sudo.


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You need to add a label to the partition. To do this, either use a filesystem specific tool, such as e2label for ext2/3/4 or use gparted. For example: #e2label /dev/sda2 Schijf-2 Do NOT mount the partition on a mount point (such as /home/Schijf-2) as it will then be part of that directory tree in your file manager and consequently will not show up. The ...


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By default, if your fstab entry is: UUID=913aedd1... /media/Schijf-2 ext4 rw,relatime 0 2 your partition will not be shown as Schijf-2 in your sidebar, unless it is labelled Schijf-2. You have two options: Leave the fstab entry as is and label your partition (e.g. if sda2 is your partition): e2label /dev/sda2 Schijf-2 Leave the partition ...


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UUID=913aedd1-9c06-46fa-a26e-32bf5ef0a150 /media/Schijf-2 ext4 rw,relatime,discard 0 2 See man fstab for the complete list and description of the options.



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