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Disclaimer: I don't know if this is the right thing to do, but it worked for me. So, I essentially needed the startup process to take a little extra time so that networking services could finish loading and the iSCSI mounts could be created so there would be something to mount to. What I did was add sleep 5 to the /etc/rc.d/mountlate script. # PROVIDE: ...


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I added "noauto,x-systemd.automount" to my mount options in fstab like suggested by "DavidCWGA" here: https://github.com/raspberrypi/linux/issues/824 Working for me now!


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Mounting a disk over /home/user/mydata does NOT remove anything from the existing /home/user/mydata. It just 'covers up' the directory with the other disk. If you want to reclaim the disk space from /home/user/mydata, you need to manually delete/move those files to the new disk before mounting.


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With a systemd enabled system you can use tmpfiles. See man 5 tmpfiles.d for details. Create a file /etc/tmpfiles.d/tmp.conf with this content: d /tmp 1777 root root - - systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service will take care of your permissions.


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If you copied the files to the new partition but didn't delete them from the root partition, the old ones are masked or hidden by mounting the new partition on top of them. In that case, you should still have the same amount of root partition being in use, no space being freed. Unless we both missed that part, deleting the old copies is not included in the ...


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The new filesystem (/home) is mounted over the directory (/home) on the original filesystem. So the files are still there, but they are hidden from simple access. To avoid this, you would need to add some steps to your process. Namely, rename the /home directory after creating a copy of the content. Then, create a new empty directory /home as the new ...


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Newer versions of systemd support a x-systemd.requires option in fstab, so if you don't want to use systemd.mount units and want to stick to fstab try something like the following: aufs /mnt/storage aufs ...


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The mount command looks at /etc/fstab, but there is no requirement that an arbitrary command that mounts a filesystem has to look at /etc/fstab. And there are many such commands. From man mount If only the directory or the device is given, for example: mount /dir then mount looks for a mountpoint (and if not found then for a ...


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Since it's now clear you're running software raid ("fake raid", where the firmware/BIOS also has a software RAID implementation to make booting Windows off of it easier—in this case, Intel Matrix Storage), you're probably seeing some bug in Arch's initramfs w/r/t partitioning md arrays. True hardware raid is almost entirely transparent to the OS; e.g., you ...



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