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18

Improving disk cache performance in general is more than just increasing the file system cache size unless your whole system fits in RAM in which case you should use RAM drive (tmpfs is good because it allows falling back to disk if you need the RAM in some case) for runtime storage (and perhaps an initrd script to copy system from storage to RAM drive at ...


10

Firstly, I DO NOT recommend you continue using NTFS, as ntfs implemention in Linux would be performance and security trouble at any time. There are several things you can do: use some newer fs such as ext4 or btrfs try to change your io scheduler, for example bfq turn off swap use some automatic preloader like preload use something like systemd to preload ...


9

Generally not, but with newer versions of mount/swapon/fsck... on Linux (from util-linux 2.19) at least, you can have more files (with .fstab extension) in /etc/fstab.d. So you can have a /etc/fstab.d/00_header.fstab, /etc/fstab.d/50_middle.fstab, /etc/fstab.d/99_end.fstab. Another approach if all you want is mount -a to run some command is have an entry ...


8

As it's states in usage section, -p will skip pseudofs mounts (tmpfs, autofs and others): usage: genfstab [options] root Options: -L Use labels for source identifiers (shortcut for -t LABEL) -p Avoid printing pseudofs mounts -t TAG Use TAG for source identifiers -U Use UUIDs for source identifiers (shortcut for ...


7

Read ahead: On 32 bit systems: blockdev --setra 8388607 /dev/sda On 64 bit systems: blockdev --setra 4294967295 /dev/sda Write behind cache: echo 100 > /proc/sys/vm/dirty_ratio This will use up to 100% of your free memory as write cache. Or you can go all out and use tmpfs. This is only relevant if you have RAM enough. Put this in /etc/fstab. ...


7

//megaboxy/inetpub /mnt/megabo cifs username=admin, password=passwd 0 0 ^ this is a problem You can't put spaces between the options. Remove that and that error should go avay.


7

One of the first things a linux system is doing is mounting all file systems to the correct mountpoint in order to let all other parts of the system find their files. The root file system is usually given on the kernel command line. It will mount this file system and look in /etc/fstab for all the other mount points. If you really want to do anything weird ...


7

Mountpoint /dev is devtmpfs filesystem and managed by udev completely. So for details we have to go to udev configuration. 2 udev rules are handling this typically $ grep -ri '/dev/disk' /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/ /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-persistent-storage.rules:# persistent storage links: /dev/disk/{by-id,by-uuid,by-label,by-path} ...


7

When the boot loader calls the kernel it passes it a parameter called root. So once the kernel finished initializing it will continue by mounting the given root partition to / and then calling /sbin/init (unless this has been overriden by other parameters). Then the init process starts the rest of the system by loading all services that are defined to be ...


7

Unmount the partition: # umount /part Rename the directory after making sure it's not mounted: # mountpoint /part &>/dev/null || mv /part /best_name_ever Edit /etc/fstab to replace /part with /best_name_ever Remount the partition: mount /best_name_ever The # is of course meant to represent your root prompt, not actual input to be typed in. ...


6

The Arch Linux Wiki has a comprehensive list of the field definitions in your /etc/fstab file, including those that you are asking about: nodev - Don't interpret block special devices on the filesystem. nosuid - Block the operation of suid, and sgid bits. 0 2 are, respectively, dump & pass: <dump> - used by the dump utility to decide when to ...


6

The options field in fstab is comma-delimited (note every other (non-swap) line). You have spaces. Fix that and it should work as intended.


6

bind mirrors a filesystem (among other situatons, it's useful when setting a chroot inside which you need to have a "complete" system (like when unpacking/installing Gentoo). Just simply like that, it mirrors a tree from A into B. I don't know for sure if it has any option, but I doubt it, it does not do more than, well, mirroring. Unlike a symlink, which ...


6

It has to do with boot order. Highest priority is required for booting (/ and in my opinion /usr /var /tmp ...). The /boot filesystem can do with lower priority because by the time the system can start fsck's, it read the necessary files from boot already. Filesystems for home directories etc. are lower priority during boot process.


6

Something is very fishy about that fstab-line: /dev/xvdf /dev/xvdb1 ext3 defaults 0 0 Normally they have the format: /dev/device /mnt/mountpoint fs flags stuffINeverRemember Basically, what this line does or tries is mounting /dev/xvdf onto the directory /dev/xvdb1. I think you misunderstood how /etc/fstab works. You most likely want something like ...


6

This is a side effect of how the debian initramfs operates. Initially the kernel creates a tmpfs for the root, and unpacks the initramfs, which is a compressed cpio archive, there. The programs and scripts in the initramfs mount the real root device and then chroot there. Simply ignore the first entry that lists the filesystem as rootfs, as that is just ...


6

The UUIDs don't change when you reorder the drives. However, your sdc? entries might change. It's best practice not to rely on the sd? numbering. Better use UUIDs or LABELs to address your partitions. Find the UUID or LABEL as root: blkid -o list -c /dev/null Change the entries Change the entries that use the /dev/sd? syntax (in your case /dev/sdc1) to ...


6

The simple answer is you don't. /etc is where all the configuration stuff is: how can the system operate if it doesn't know where to find it's configurations? Why would you even want to?


6

ext3/4 file systems have a default mount options attribute in their headers. You can see it with: $ LC_ALL=C tune2fs -l /dev/device | grep 'Default mount options:' Default mount options: user_xattr acl You can change it with tune2fs -o and mounting with -o noacl would override it. When creating a new file system, mke2fs will set that based on what you ...


5

You can set the read-ahead size with blockdev --setra sectors /dev/sda1, where sectors is the size you want in 512 byte sectors.


5

Key-based authentication can only work if the ssh process can find your key. You presumably have your key in your home directory; but you've never told sshfs where to look for a key. At boot time, it would be root mounting all filesystems, therefore the key must be either in /root/.ssh or referenced in /root/.ssh/config. I recommend mounting the filesystem ...


5

It seems that I've found a solution: at the grub prompt, hit a to append options add init=/bin/bash to the kernel command line mount -o remount,rw / vim /etc/fstab reboot


5

You can also find out which device and partition belong to the UUID by issuing the following as root: blkid or by issuing the following as a user ls -l /dev/disk/by-uuid


5

I want /etc and /home on one partition No you don't. It's like asking to have your brain transplanted to your knee :-) Whatever your problem is, making /etc a separate partition or merging it with /home is not the solution. What is the actual problem you want to solve?


5

I like to use the column command with the -t option for aligning columns into a nice table: column -t /etc/fstab proc /proc proc nodev,noexec,nosuid 0 0 /dev/disk/by-label/Linux / ext4 errors=remount-ro 0 1 /dev/disk/by-label/Home /home ext4 defaults 0 0


5

The advantage of using the UUID is that it is independent from the actual device number the operating system gives your hard disk. Image you add another hard disk to the system, and for some reason the OS decides that your old disk is now sdb instead of sba. Your boot process would be screwed up if fstab would point to the device name. However, in case of ...


4

So, question: can I force to map the drives with fixed path? I tried using Labels but it didn't seem to work. Use UUID: $ ls -lF /dev/disk/by-uuid/ total 0 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 Sep 15 15:35 61965e0c-8aba-4207-9424-1350aa6e051e -> ../../sda2 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 Sep 15 15:35 e002a7bc-02da-47a8-ab98-1225e6ace6d5 -> ../../sda1 lrwxrwxrwx ...


4

pmount is generally to be used for mounting custom external devices that are not in fstab. What you experience is a feature of pmount - a part of its policy (see man pmount, search for fstab). If you want to permit normal users to mount cdrom, you can either comment it out in /etc/fstab and use pmount or set up the cdrom entry in fstab so that users are ...


4

You are probably using the ntfs-3g driver, which is a user mode filesystem. It will show up in /proc/mounts and /etc/mtab as fuse.


4

The line in /etc/fstab I eventually used was: //10.1.0.15/G4\040320H /media/G4 cifs username=master,user 0 0 What solved the issue of not being prompted for the password as well as credentials= not working was installing mount.cifs via: sudo apt-get install cifs-utils Just like Michael Mrozek I assumed I had mount.cifs installed or else I ...



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