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0

You have two hopes: restore from backup, or get a spare disk to recover files onto, and try your luck with photorec.


0

As of FreeBSD 10.3, you can achieve this by temporarily modifying /etc/rc.d/root to run /sbin/fsck -y /. Here is the current script, modified to include that command commented out; uncomment to perform the fsck. #!/bin/sh # # $FreeBSD: stable/10/etc/rc.d/root 177062 2008-03-11 17:21:14Z delphij $ # # PROVIDE: root # REQUIRE: fsck # KEYWORD: nojail . ...


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From the kernel logs: Apr 10 09:49:04 owner-Inspiron-560s kernel: [ 670.588044] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdf] CDB: Apr 10 09:49:04 owner-Inspiron-560s kernel: [ 670.588046] Write(10): 2a 00 00 00 00 3e 00 00 01 00 Apr 10 09:49:04 owner-Inspiron-560s kernel: [ 670.588059] end_request: I/O error, dev sdf, sector 62 Apr 10 09:49:04 owner-Inspiron-560s kernel: [ ...


-2

There are two kinds of fsck, "normal" sudo fsck /dev/sdx and "full" sudo fsck -f /dev/sdx Your computer runs a normal fsck at every boot, which is really fast. fsck -f obviously takes longer, but in newer filesystems (ext4) it's still quite fast. With SSD might as well double that, and your fsck -f shouldn't take long at all. Warning: Never run ...


1

You can put 0 (or nothing) on the sixth field of /etc/fstab for the root filesystem to disable fsck on / on next reboot. For example: UUID=foobar / ext4 errors=remount-ro 0 0 Again, as you have said this is not recommended absolutely. From man 5 fstab: The sixth field (fs_passno): This field is used by the fsck(8) program to ...



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