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If you're absolutely sure that the end of the last partition fits on the target drive, you can copy the drive wholesale. Don't use dd, which is slower (unless used with additional options, and not always even then) and more error-prone; simply use cat. cat /dev/sdc >/dev/sdz Replace /dev/sdz by the proper path to the drive that you want to overwrite. ...


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Any easy way to improve fsck times even further? @HaukeLaging is right, things can be sped up by changing the density of inodes on the file system. See newfs -i.


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Mount them read-only, when possible, and the fsck won't be necessary. But you really need to be more specific (what partitions are you talking about? Were's just guessing without and fstab) and especially understand that things happen like that for a reason. E.g. sshd is on /usr and your user profile is on /home. Assuming these are separate partitions, ...


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You can use dd to create copies of the partitions and not of all the device. dd if=/dev/sad1 of=/tmp/boot.img dd if=/dev/sad2 of=/tmp/root.img As for Q2b: I did this several times, never had a problem, but still this is not recommended.


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I believe that adding nobootwait to the fstab entries would work, but openbsd may not implement that. mountalll, used with Upstart, does. I think systemd does too.


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Remove/comment the entries in /etc/fstab which you to want to avoid automatic mount while booting. Then make a entry in /etc/rc.local file in the complete mount command format


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Edit your /etc/fstab file so that the fourth field of the file systems you want to delay mounting have the noauto option set. You can then set up a script that you either run manually, or set up in the rc scripts to run after SSH is started to fsck and mount the remaining file systems. From reading the man page for OpenBSD /etc/fstab, you may also want to ...



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