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2

"Unstable" FreeBSD 10/i386 on VirtualBox, Xen, KVM For FreeBSD installation On FreeBSD boot menu, when booting from installation media, choose: 3. Escape to loader prompt to enter the following commands: set vfs.unmapped_buf_allowed=0 (enter) boot (enter) Then proceed to FreeBSD installation as usual. To run your new FreeBSD system Two solutions: ...


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sysctl kern.geom.debugflags=16 This solve it for me. If some one can explain for future reader how and why this work I delete my answer and accept your answer.


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As they all say, legally it is not UNIX. Think of it this way; if you had a boat with 100 peices, every year you would switch one old piece for a new peice and store that old piece in a shed. In 99 years, when you only have one peice of wood from the original boat, it techincally still is the same boat, right? But when you remove that last piece of original ...


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I think you might need to download the larger installation image, it comes with more stuff, I think, I know that is true about linux, but not sure about FreeBSD. But I don't think it has anything to do with the internet. I'd say something wrong with the file extractor. Try getting pkg from ports, if it's there.


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It's a function of the BIOS on whatever sort of hardware you are attempting to boot with. If the BIOS supports it, an obvious option is to burn a DVD and use a USB based DVD device. If your BIOS doesn't support it, no level of boot record magic will fix that. Bottom line is to spend some time sussing your BIOS and perhaps flashing it to the latest/greatest ...


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Try: export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=$LD_LIBRARY_PATH:/usr/local/lib then run make again. A note that you don't need sudo to run make. From FreeBSD ldconfig documentation: The LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable can be used to override the use of directories (or the order thereof) from the cache or to specify additional directories where shared ...


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I had several servers that showed the same behavior, network/local resolvers not started when the NFS mount is being accessed. The solution was changing service start. Not sure about freebsd, but that should give you a starting point.


2

I found this tutorial. It's untested by me but several commenters to the article attested to it working. The article is titled: Mount a ufs2 Volume in MacOS/X 10.7 (Lion). excerpt If you have to mount an ufs2 volume (for example an external FreeNAS disk) in MacOS/X Lion, you can do the following: Download and install OSXFUSE from ...


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For the best quality answers, you will need to post the content of master.cf and more details about your configuration. But, looking at my configuration for example: ========================================================================== # service type private unpriv chroot wakeup maxproc command + args # (yes) (yes) (yes) ...


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Kqueue is more general, and more complex than epoll. Source: http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/~sangjin/2012/12/21/epoll-vs-kqueue.html


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Here's the solution I used to the problem, for future reference: I installed freebsd 10.0-RELEASE using the "stock" disc1 ISO, selected root-on-zfs and targeted the two SSDs I wanted to use. I completed the installation, then booted into the live-cd environment, inserted a small USB flash drive made a filesystem on it, made a zroot@fresh snapshot, and used ...


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Spent sometime on this today, and I think there are two issues here: every for loop iteration, a new incremental file is created (or old one is overwritten :-) . Remember, there is 1:1 mapping between the archive file and the snapshot file, thus one gtar-incremental can not serve all of the archive files. gtar does not like time stamps.This is because the ...


3

I don't have access to a BSD machine to check but your ps command should work as advertised. In any case, as a dirty hack, you could always just parse the output of the full ps (where NNN is the PID you are after): ps aux | awk -v OFS="\t" '$2=="NNN"' Or, to keep the output format identical to that of ps: ps aux | grep -i '^[a-z ]*NNN ' You may have ...


1

While it may not be applicable to all operations that can be expressed easily in natural language, FreeBSD's date has the -v operator that allows to set both arbitrary and relative values to separate date fields, and this can be repeated as necessary to produce most effects. For example, to get "last sunday" one can apply "zero out all time fields" followed ...


2

Probably the best way to ensure compatibility is to install GNU date on the FreeBSD system. You can install the coreutils package from the FreeBSD ports collection. This will put the GNU date command into /usr/local/bin/gdate.


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There are a number of commands on FreeBSD that use the same API as GNU date to input natural language dates from the user. I've just found one that can be tricked into converting that date into Unix epoch time: /usr/sbin/fifolog_reader -B 'last sunday' /dev/null 2>&1 | sed 's/^From[[:blank:]]*\([0-9]*\).*/\1/p' (note that at least on FreeBSD ...


2

I don't think the installer can do what you want yet (although it's getting better over time), so you could try booting the installation image, and run a root shell from the initial menu. You can then use gpart, zpool and zfs to configure your disks by hand and install the system from the archives on the image. There are numerous guides around the Internet, ...



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