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3

In FreeBSD, you have to explicitly allow services outside the core system to start. In your /etc/rc.conf add the following line: avahi_daemon_enable="YES" (You might also need avahi_dnsconfd_enable="YES".)


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Yes, for PC-BSD you can install programs using the Appcafe, packages or ports. They MAY conflict. I exclusively use packages (or ports) and avoid the Appcafe at all costs. I don't remember why, just that I had issues with it years ago. The package system is installed by default. If you need ports you can portsnap them or git them (see what I did there??) ...


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Not a direct answer to your question, but you could cryptsetup open, resize2fs to shrink your encrypted filesystem, cryptsetup close, parted resizepart to shrink the partition and mkpart a new one in the freed space, mkfs to create an unencrypted filesystem suitable for hassle-free data exchange. If you decide on that route you have to keep in mind that the ...


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To answer your specific question 'But how does it know whats the IP address of the DHCP server to lease from ? Can someone please help me with that ?', the answer is whichever DHCP server gets a packet to your machine first. If you're running in vmware, it would also be running a DHCP server – you'll need to work out how configure it to not provide an ...


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Looks like this -r usage only made it into the sources on 7 May 2015. Perhaps your version doesn't do this yet? Revision 282608 - (view) (download) (annotate) - [select for diffs] Modified Thu May 7 20:54:38 2015 UTC (12 months, 1 week ago) by delphij date(1): Make -r behave like GNU's version when the option can not be interpreted as a number, which ...


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The script has a line along:date +%d -r "$file"which works fine under linux, but … … on FreeBSD/PC-BSD will fail because the date command parses its command lines with getopt() and options must strictly precede arguments. The format string +%d is an argument, and must follow the -r option; otherwise -r isn't recognized as an option, but ...


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Yes, you can treat the device file as a raw device file, and read/write data from/to it using the same APIs used to access normal files. In most cases, you can use dd, or simply cat data to/from the device file. Keep in mind that there are several practical differences between raw devices and real files on a filesystem: Devices have a fixed size. Writing ...


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@Lildirt's solution works on FreeNAS too (FreeNAS-9.10-STABLE-201605021851). Short story long, I picked up a two-card pack for $50 and a direct attach cable so that I could do iSCSI between FreeNAS and my other server running ESXi. ESXi recognized the card no problem; much like pfsense in OP's situation, FreeBSD did not know what it is. My steps differed in ...


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Barring some temporary bug report/fix (not found in the port's changelog), FreeBSD does not require xterm to be setuid, and has not used that with xterm since 2011. The port maintainer's comment said - Don't set suid bit. In our implementation, grantpt() and unlockpt() don't actually have any use, because PTY's are created on the fly and already have ...


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It is as the LWN article states "when you write out a block, you lock it and iterate through the records of individual changes to this block. For each individual change whose dependencies haven't yet been satisfied, you undo that change to the block, and then write out the resulting block." However the part of visualizing this whole process was difficult and ...



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