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5

There are a number of commands on FreeBSD that use the same API as GNU date to input natural language dates from the user. I've just found one that can be tricked into converting that date into Unix epoch time: /usr/sbin/fifolog_reader -B 'last sunday' /dev/null 2>&1 | sed 's/^From[[:blank:]]*\([0-9]*\).*/\1/p' (note that at least on FreeBSD ...


3

I don't have access to a BSD machine to check but your ps command should work as advertised. In any case, as a dirty hack, you could always just parse the output of the full ps (where NNN is the PID you are after): ps aux | awk -v OFS="\t" '$2=="NNN"' Or, to keep the output format identical to that of ps: ps aux | grep -i '^[a-z ]*NNN ' You may have ...


2

I don't think the installer can do what you want yet (although it's getting better over time), so you could try booting the installation image, and run a root shell from the initial menu. You can then use gpart, zpool and zfs to configure your disks by hand and install the system from the archives on the image. There are numerous guides around the Internet, ...


2

I found this tutorial. It's untested by me but several commenters to the article attested to it working. The article is titled: Mount a ufs2 Volume in MacOS/X 10.7 (Lion). excerpt If you have to mount an ufs2 volume (for example an external FreeNAS disk) in MacOS/X Lion, you can do the following: Download and install OSXFUSE from ...


2

Probably the best way to ensure compatibility is to install GNU date on the FreeBSD system. You can install the coreutils package from the FreeBSD ports collection. This will put the GNU date command into /usr/local/bin/gdate.


1

While it may not be applicable to all operations that can be expressed easily in natural language, FreeBSD's date has the -v operator that allows to set both arbitrary and relative values to separate date fields, and this can be repeated as necessary to produce most effects. For example, to get "last sunday" one can apply "zero out all time fields" followed ...


1

You can do this with netcat (ssh works too; but I'm assuming both the old machine and the new machine are on the same "secure" LAN). Briefly: Build your VM with your disk space and whatnot. Boot to the FreeBSD install DVD (probably doesn't matter which version). Use the post installation options to partition and format your drives (they don't ...


1

I haven't used the new installer yet but I have used mfsbsd with 9.x, doing exactly what you describe. There is an option to the zfsinstall on mfsbsd: -z zfs_part_size : create zfs parition of this size (default: all space left) mfsbsd is really simple and fast to use.



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