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"Raster font" sounds like the Windows command-window (and by the way is not a TrueType font). Linux console fonts can be set, but those are custom-built fonts (not generated or automatically translated from Windows fonts). Unless someone made one of the Linux console fonts to imitate the Windows appearance, you're out of luck. Further reading: How to ...


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Yes you can. Go to your settings page and click advanced settings. Under "Web Content" section click the fonts button. Then at the bottom of the dialog box go to advanced font options. This will take you to a Chrome plugin for advanced fonts / font scripts here is a link if the link is not in the fonts section ...


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I found a python library, fonttools (pypi) that can be used to do it with a bit of python scripting. Here is a simple script that lists all fonts that have specified glyph: #!/usr/bin/python from fontTools.ttLib import TTFont import sys char = long(sys.argv[1], base=0) print u"Looking for U+%X (%c)" % (char, unichr(char)) for arg in sys.argv[2:]: ...


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Most apps nowadays rely on the fontconfig library to render fonts. It's configuration files usually provided with the package are documented and self-descriptive. System-wide conf. files placed in the /etc/fonts/conf.d/ directory. Fallback font settings are usually in the 60-latin.conf and 65-non-latin.conf files.



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