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It's enough to copy your font in ~/.fonts or /usr/share/fonts. Carefully, /usr/share/fonts has some dir, please read them. Then for ~/.fonst run : fc-cache -v -f #with your username And for /usr/share/fonts run : fc-cache -v -f #with superuser


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An application running in a terminal has no way to find out from the terminal what the glyphs that the terminal has drawn look like (or even if they are substitute/placeholder characters). One thing the application can do is find out if the terminal supports UTF-8 at all, and if it does, if it supports variable width characters. The method is as follows: ...


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A lot of additional packages related to fonts and media is available in this repository mentioned in the CentOS Wiki. yum install wine Installs most all the fonts needed, when the repository is added, as per the wiki here: https://wiki.centos.org/TipsAndTricks/MultimediaOnCentOS7 yum -y install ...


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short: xterm uses a single font (except for the special cases of double-width characters), while the other terminals use additional fonts (and they use those fonts for the characters not found in your requested font). long: the character you are interested in is not part of the font, which appears to be something like fonts-hack-tty in Debian. The missing ...


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This is the default Font settings from my Antergos Installation: Basically Sans Regular and Monospace Regular. And all fonts are Truetype Fonts


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The "System Settings" and "Font" dialog will (as a rule) affect only desktop applications which have been integrated with it. In your configuration, those are KDE applications. In X, most applications manage their fontsizes by themselves, and are not affected by these dialogs. Or, even if there is some nominal integration, it may not be maintained. For ...



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