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14

gnome-font-viewer (part of GNOME of course) can do this (this is the default association for fonts under GNOME); indeed, it comes with a button to install the font, which obviously wouldn't make sense if the font needed to be installed already. fontmatrix lets you organize groups of fonts to be installed or uninstalled, and you can preview them and see ...


12

There are two mechanisms for fonts in X land: server-side and client-side. The traditional way to render fonts is for the client to tell the server “render foo at position (x,y) in font F” (where a font specification includes a face, size, encoding and other attributes). Either the X server itself, or a specialized program called a font server, opens the ...


12

The font is Donald Knuth's Computer Modern. The documentation was no doubt created with LaTeX (or maybe even plain TeX). (Actually, these are both confirmed by the PDF metadata.) (Edit: Poking around a bit more, it looks like, strictly speaking the documentation is created in a base format, which, thanks to GNU texinfo is exported to a variety of formats, ...


11

Often times when in a Unix/Linux terminal (Bash) for example you'll use the commands more or less or cat to view a file. When you do this and the file isn't meant to be viewed (such as /bin/ls) you'll get output like this:                  What's going on here is that you just ...


9

From the man page: CHANGING FONTS Changing fonts (or font sizes, respectively) via the keypad is not yet supported in rxvt-unicode. Bug me if you need this. You can, however, switch fonts at runtime using escape sequences, e.g.: printf '\e]710;%s\007' "9x15bold,xft:Kochi Gothic" You can use keyboard shortcuts, ...


8

This is slightly modified from the instructions found here (and I haven't even checked if they work): Install the chkfontpath package from ATrpms (Click on either the i686 or x86_64 package, depending on whether you have a 32-bit or 64-bit machine). As root, install some packages you'll need for the following steps: yum install rpm-build cabextract ...


7

In short: you cannot with the current version of Emacs (checked with 23.2), but see below for a possible workaround. Longer story: support for italics is encoded in the terminfo database as the sitm (enter italics) and ritm (exit italics) capabilities (also called ZH and ZR for termcap compatibility); you can check that your terminal supports them via: ...


7

xfontsel lets you browse through the available X11 fonts and provides rendered previews so you can see what they actually look like. It's fairly plain-looking and basic but it is provided with most Xorg installations by default.


6

There is a (reasonably old) thread on the suckless mailing list about this issue, that includes a patch: called pango. There is slightly more recent version in the AUR for 5.8.2: https://aur.archlinux.org/packages.php?ID=33193


6

You can effectively disable bold fonts by just applying the same font string for both urxvt's regular and bold fonts in .Xresources, for example: URxvt.font:xft:droid sans mono slashed:size=10.5 URxvt.boldFont:xft:droid sans mono slashed:size=10.5


6

If you use the Linux console, the best way I found is: in /etc/default/console-setup put, for example CHARMAP="UTF-8" CODESET="Lat7" FONTFACE="Terminus" FONTSIZE="28x14" Another way is to use setfont: setfont /usr/share/consolefonts/Lat7-Terminus28x14.psf This works for my Debian; it may be different for you. In Debian, you can also run ...


6

According to http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/10100/fontsupport.htm the following several fonts support U+10100: Code2001, EversonMono (and EversonMono Oblique), MPH 2B Damase, and Penuturesu. Note that Code2001 isn’t where it used to be, but it can be downloaded from my Code2001 page. And you can add ALPHA-Demo and Quivira to the list. ...


6

A font like tahoma can be found in the wine fonts package. There's also a package called ttf-ms-fonts which includes some the fonts you mentioned and can be legally installed. See for example this information for arch linux. Includes: Andalé Mono Arial Arial Black Comic Sans Courier New Georgia Impact Lucida Sans Lucida Console Microsoft Sans Serif Times ...


6

The Liberation font doesn't seem to have this symbol. But using XTerm*faceName: DejaVu Sans Mono (which is also a truetype font) allows ☠ to be displayed. EDIT: Do not use LibreOffice or OpenOffice to determine whether a glyph is supported in a font, as it silently falls back to another font: OpenOffice bug 45128.


5

Font Manager is very handy for previewing and comparing fonts. It doesn't let you open a TTF file, but in Linux "installing" a font is not a big deal, just copy it temporarily to ~/.fonts.


5

With the modern font libraries, this is easy. The best way is to simply get the .ttf files you want and drop them into ~/.fonts in your home directory. (If that doesn't exist, create it.) Then, they should be available to your applications. This is per-user rather than system-wide (which you get with the msttcorefonts package), but has some advantages — you ...


5

The hands-down most comprehensive coverage would be Roman Czyborra’s GNU Unicode font project. It is intended to collect a complete and free 8×16/16×16 pixel Unicode font. It currently covers over 34,000 characters (out of ~40,000+ defined characters). Most distributions have Gnu Unifont in their repositories. There is a comprehensive list of unicode ...


5

If you are referring to Ubuntu Font Family, then yes it is available to other distributions (for example, there is an Arch package in the AUR), but it would be equally straightforward to download it and install it manually if a package wasn't available for your distro. The font is here: http://font.ubuntu.com/download/ubuntu-font-family-0.71.2.zip


5

After some research based on the answers of @fpmurphy and @hesse, also based on a comprehensive thread at ubuntuforums and on Fedora Wiki, I found out how to reduce the font size of GRUB2. Choose a font, in this example I chose DejaVuSansMono.ttf Convert the font in a format GRUB understands: sudo grub2-mkfont -s 14 -o /boot/grub2/DejaVuSansMono.pf2 ...


5

It's standard to print the Unicode replacement character in place of a character which does not exist in the current font. A possible fix is simply to change the default font of either your OS (if the browser inherits the OS settings) or the browser. For example, my Firefox 11.0 on Ubuntu 11.10 is using the "serif" font (which might be a synonym for ...


5

Firefox's rendering engine will substitute glyphs from other installed fonts (if it can find one with the required glyph) instead of displaying broken glyphs. Chromium will stick to the specified font(s) instead, and will display a "missing glyph" character if the glyph is not found. For Chromium and possibly other programs, you need to install Chinese ...


5

You should edit the file /etc/default/console-setup and change the FONTSIZE variable. Once you've made your changes you must reconfigure your terminal by running: $ sudo service console-setup restart


5

Arial and Verdana were released as part of the "Core Fonts for the Web" project. These are still freely [legally] available and easy to install in Linux. Tahoma... and newer fonts like Calibri ... heh, I think it's very unlikely that these could ever be had [legally] for free.


5

Most modern applications, including all Gtk (→ GNOME) and Qt (→ KDE) applications, use xft, which performs the rendering client-side and sends an image to the server. (Possibly via the XRender extension, but it's an image that gets sent for rendering, not text). So for these applications the X server has no notion of fonts. You can't do any better than ...


5

Have you tried ? fc-list | grep -i "media" Also give a try to fc-scan, fc-match


4

rxvt does not support TrueType, but there is a fork rxvt-unicode (or urxvt) which can. urxvt(1) gives two examples: urxvt -fn "xft:Bitstream Vera Sans Mono:pixelsize=15" urxvt -fn "9x15bold,xft:Bitstream Vera Sans Mono"


4

updated answer Since you're using Fedora, the variable that you need to play with is SYSFONT in the file /etc/sysconfig/i18n. Play with the font-sizes ( 8, 12, 16, 32, etc ). The avialable fonts are listed in /lib/kbd/consolefonts/. You should be able to test the fonts by using setfont from your TTY: $ setfont /lib/kbd/consolefonts/iso07u-16.psfu.gz ...


4

Emacs has the ability to show fonts with different faces, colors, and sizes in the same buffer. For instance, the following is produced by the AUCTeX major-mode, a useful mode for those who use LaTeX to create documents: The two search terms that will be helpful are "font-locking" and "major mode". Essentially, to accomplish this in Emacs you would have ...


4

For some reason, web browser like to make the monospace font smaller than other text, which can make code harder to read. There are two ways to handle this in Chrome. Option 1: Customize Font Settings Click the wrench icon. Select "Preferences" Select "Under the Hood" Under "Web Content" you can "Customize Fonts..." -- you'll want to change the ...


4

As Gilles said, to use a TrueType font like Consolas in Emacs 23 you must link it with the Freetype and Fontconfig libraries. In Gentoo, you do that by turning on the xft use flag when building Emacs. You'll need to turn that flag on (either globally or just for app-editors/emacs) and reinstall Emacs.



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