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How about Splunk? It processes any machine data and gives ability to do all sorts of acrobatics with it.


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I checked. The issue was with thr firewall. Iptables was not registered as a service. So issuing a firewall command to allow from my ip worked. Command used was: iptables -I INPUT -p tcp -s xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx --dport 3306 -j ACCEPT


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In principle, having open ports isn't a problem: all services that listen on network ports should require authentication. However, it's a good idea to block incoming connections that you don't need, in case you run a service that isn't set up properly, or you have an account with a weak password. The low-level command to set up port blocking on Linux is ...


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That sounds like a firewall or proxy block on that specific port is in place. Try tcptraceroute, it should help pinpoint where you are being blocked. tcptraceroute serveraddress 22 (Assuming the ssh server is on standard port 22.) Additionally use the ssh switch -vvv and examine the output. Pipe the output through tee, because there will be a lot. ...


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This sounds like a firewall problem to me. Try using ssh with the -v flag for debugging output. This will give you a better clue as to what the problem may be. Also try to telnet to your ssh server on port 22 like this: telnet yourserver 22 You should get a response back with the ssh version number.


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IP Spoofing, is a technique where the attacker uses a forged IP source address with the purpose of concealing the identity of the sender or impersonating another computing system. However, this kind of attack will be nearly "impossible" from the internet because RFC1918 defines the following blocks that will be used only inside LAN environments: The ...


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You also need port 445 and make sure that you also have incoming related/established traffic allowed. grep 445 /etc/services microsoft-ds 445/tcp # Microsoft Naked CIFS microsoft-ds 445/udp


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Consider to use fwbuilder (http://www.fwbuilder.org/). It's an opensource tool that manage a sort of kinds of firewall.


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For a large or a considerable range of ip's my recommendation for you is use ipset If want to block an entire country ip block you can use the geoip module for iptables.


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Some time ago I used ferm and a custom and simple bash script to generate rulesets and insert it in the correct order vía "include" directive in ferm. If you want logging connections, etc... you can use ulog-mysql, and save specific data matched with a specific iptables rule in mysql and graph whatever you want from this point forward. Another possibility ...


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In my opinion your best bet will be to use a configuration management tool like Puppet, Chef, CFEngine or Ansible so you can define your policies based on the host type and apply it to any new host.



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