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The space is actually irrelevant. The shell parses the command in exactly the same way. The difference is whether Firefox is already running or not. It appears that the -private option only works when starting Firefox. If Firefox is already running, firefox -private opens a non-private window in the existing Firefox instance.


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Assuming you know how to start a browser - I'd use Greasemonkey, it can be used to pressing buttons, clicking links and whatsoever the browser can do. For Chrome there is a Tampermonkey - for the same purpose.


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Upstart might do your job. Create a file $HOME/.config/upstart/firefox-with-yoururl.conf with following content: start on desktop-start stop on desktop-end exec firefox <url> Reference : http://ifdeflinux.blogspot.in/2013/04/upstart-user-sessions-in-ubuntu-raring.html


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Adobe abandoned Flash for Linux years ago. Which is a good thing because Flash is a security nightmare. If you really must play a flash video, the best method is to just download it and play it with mplayer or similar. Or convert it from .flv to .mp4 or something with ffmpeg or handbrake. There are several video-downloader plugins available for firefox ...


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You can run the below command from a shell script/terminal window. Before launching Firefox (or any other browser), it will read from it's stdin the content to display upon opening. If it is not HTML being sent, change the text/html string in the below URL to whatever the file type is (for example, text/plain or image/png). firefox "data:text/html;base64,$...


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While in full screen mode, if you right-click at the very top of the screen, is there a checkmark in front of "Hide Toolbars"? If not, go ahead and click that to turn it back on. The corresponding preference in about:config is browser.fullscreen.autohide (default value is true).


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You can read the measured startup time from the configuration (about:config): browser.slowStartup.averageTime



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