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15

Has been an issue with firefox for quite a while, try running firefox as firefox -no-remote (setting MOZ_NO_REMOTE=1 as environment variable should work as well). Here's more info


14

The short answer is, you're better off writing a temporary file and opening that. Getting pipes to work properly is more complicated and probably won't give you any extra advantages. That said, here's what I've found. If your firefox command is actually starting Firefox instead of talking with an already-running Firefox instance, you can do this: echo ...


14

On modern-ish X.org installations, there is an XF86Ungrab keysym, which causes the server to release all active pointer or keyboard grabs. You can make the server break all grabs by generating the keysym either with a command or with the keyboard. With xdotool: xdotool key XF86Ungrab On some systems, the XF86Ungrab keysym is bound to the key combination ...


11

It's the same thing. See wikipedia. Basically, you are not allowed to re-compile the source code and still call it Firefox for trademark reasons.


10

You can encrypt and protect your Firefox passwords with a master password: Preferences → Security → Passwords Then check: ☑ Use a master password Then set a master password.


9

I believe you are mistaken. When using the Password manager, Firefox does not store your passwords in clear text: Firefox stores your password data in two files: key3.db (Master Password / Encryption key) and a "signons" file (encrypted names and passwords). You can back up your passwords by making a copy of both "Key3.db" and the "signons" ...


9

Playing around with this I find that when you choose to open a document with an external program in Firefox, what happens is that Firefox downloads the program to /tmp and then runs the chosen program with the downloaded file as an argument (read 'opens the file with the chosen program'). If you then save the file (without choosing Save As or the ...


8

There are two options I can recommend here: First, if you want to literally launch a full graphical browser and have it load a page with on a machine with no graphical capabilities, there is a tool called xvfb that will let you run a complete X server with no physical display associated with it. You then just need to run firefox with that X server set as ...


7

You can't run Firefox without all the Gtk libraries it requires, but that's easily solved by installing the libraries. Normally you would install Firefox through a package management system and this would pull in all the required libraries. To run Firefox normally, you need an X server (that's the part that displays the windows and their contents, as ...


7

I find myself using DownThemAll (was "downthemall") for my downloads. It's a Firefox plugin and thus available everywhere (a very important reason why I chose it). You can download all links / media in a page download each item with up to 10 connections and yes, you can download Facebook videos


7

Depending what Desktop Environment you're using you could integrate Firefox with default password storage mechanism for this environment: KDE - KWallet GNOME - GNOMEKeyring If you want integrate Firefox with KWallet you could use KDE Wallet password integration extension for Firefox. If you are GNOME user there is Gnome-keyring password integration ...


6

The general answer is: you can not. Framebuffer is a different (you can say: more "basic") way of interfacing the graphics than an X server creates. Only the apps that where designed to utilize a framebuffer are able to do it. And there aren't many graphical apps which contain such support - the framebuffer is mostly used for text-mode (console) ...


6

It's never recommended to use an outdated web-browser, because of security concerns. You obviously could recompile the source, specifically you would need to edit install.rdf. But It goes without saying, rigging the extension to run on a considerably outdated browser is not the best solution. It might not even be possible, if any required features are ...


6

There is no difference it is basically just a different name due to trademark issues - see the origins of the dispute. However Firefox is provided by Mozilla whereas Iceweasel is provided by Debian.


6

GNU Icecat was GNU Iceweasel, but the reason they changed the name was because Debian also used "Iceweasel" to rebrand their slightly tweaked version of firefox. What the "tweak" amounts to may just be the logo; since it involved a license Debian considers "non-free", they wanted a firefox they could distribute without it, which required a rename. A bit ...


6

Google has taken over maintenance of the Flash player on Linux and the Google Chrome browser is the only browser that can use this version (even the fully open sourced Chromium browser does not, though I suppose it may be possible to add it as a plugin). Other browsers can still use the Flash player plugin supplied by Adobe. I've read many times that Adobe ...


5

As described on the FedoraProject wiki on Flash, you might need the PulseAudio ALSA module. If one of the browser's flash plugin (or pulseaudio itself) has locked the sound device, other apps trying to use the sound device might not succeed.


5

If I had to make an educated guess about what's going on here, I'd say that firefox first looks for an open firefox window before launching, and if that exists sends it a message using X to just start a new browser window. Because the remote system is using your local display, whatever it uses for detection is picking up the local window. (This would also ...


5

Check your proxy settings in “Edit / Preferences / Network”. Maybe Firefox and Thunderbird are using a Freedesktop proxy setting which other programs you've tried aren't, and there's a problem with that proxy. Can other Freedesktop programs (e.g. Konqueror, Nautilus, …) resolve host names? Another possibility is that Firefox is now checking IPv6 names ...


5

Firefox needs an X display. This doesn't have to be a physical display on the machine where it's running: it can be a remote or virtual display. If you want to know where it's displaying, look at the DISPLAY environment variable in the Firefox process. Note that you'll need to be root (or more precisely to have the permissions of the user running the ...


5

You can use process substitution: firefox <( echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' ) firefox <( cat page_header.html contents.html footer.html ) firefox <( echo "<h1>Hello number "{1..23}"!</h1>" )


5

You can use data URIs, like this: echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' |firefox "data:text/html;base64,$(base64 -w 0 <&0)" The same trick works for other browsers, too: echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' |chromium "data:text/html;base64,$(base64 -w 0 <&0)" echo '<h1>hello, world</h1>' |opera ...


5

I don't think they're errors. It's just the X server being chatty. You can send those messages to /dev/null, also, by starting Xvfb using Xvfb :1 -screen 0 1024x768x24 2>/dev/null &


5

To answer my own question: Ignacio's answer takes care of the large icon on the system menu, and the taskbar launcher if you add one. Changing the icon on the taskbar button/panel button took more digging. Uninstalling the 'native' Firefox from LMDE (sudo apt-get remove firefox) and installing the tar.gz from http://getfirefox.com still left me with the ...


5

Something to play with It uses xdotool, which lets you script windows/desktop actions. If you supply the name of the browser as an argument, it'll find and reload the current page. You can set a default browser, so you don't need to supply one each time, and you can change whether you send a CTRL-R to reload, or SHIFT-CTRL-R to reload without cache. It ...


5

You can do this by creating or editing a file called user-dirs.dirs in ~/.config. Mine has the following: XDG_DESKTOP_DIR="$HOME/" XDG_DOCUMENTS_DIR="/srv/documents/" XDG_DOWNLOAD_DIR="$HOME/downloads/" XDG_MUSIC_DIR="/srv/music/" XDG_PICTURES_DIR="/srv/pictures/" XDG_VIDEOS_DIR="$HOME" Firefox follows whatever you have for XDG_DESKTOP_DIR.


5

You need to provide either the X magic cookies credentials (see DISPLAY and AUTHORITY) or allow connections from localhost via xhost +local:. You still need to provide the correct DISPLAY variable, typically DISPLAY=:0. Based on your error message you probably didn't specified the DISPLAY variable, check your DISPLAY variable outside of the chroot with echo ...


5

If you want vanilla Firefox, the easiest way would be to just download it from Mozilla. http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/new/ Extract it in your home folder using tar xvf downloaded.tar.gz && mv firefox/ ~/.firefox. This command will extract the tar you've downloaded, and move into a hidden directory in your home folder (aliased to ~/, which ...


4

I've got to get this out of the way first: You really, really need to turn off that system. Security updates haven't been released for it for over five years — and, what's more, that release is from back in the dark ages when the project hadn't really gotten off the ground. If you must keep it similar, moving to CentOS 5 will give you an only slightly ...


4

In my experience the proprietary linux driver that nvidia offers can cause terrible performance issues with certain cards (especially older ones). The person that resolved their problem by reverting their driver to an older version is a good demonstration of the nvidia driver's regression problems. I'd recommend trying the open source nvidia driver known as ...



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