Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Making it an answer as suggested find / -name "home_f_dump"


1

@Celada's answer is correct, but there are ways to do what you want if you're willing to play with fire and risk corrupting your data. First, the second system MUST mount the file system read-only. If you don't do this, you'll corrupt the file system. You already seem to know that. Second, any attempt to access the file system from the second system is ...


5

What is a bind mount? A bind mount is an alternate view of a directory tree. Classically, mounting creates a view of a storage device as a directory tree. A bind mount instead takes an existing directory tree and replicates it under a different point. The directories and files in the bind mount are the same as the original. Any modification on one side is ...


6

1) Download and install Samba: apt-get install samba samba-common 2) Backup samba.conf: cp /etc/samba/smb.conf /etc/samba/smb.conf.bak 3) Edit samba.conf: nano /etc/samba/smb.conf Replace all with and edit it to your wishes: [global] workgroup = arbeitsgruppe server string = %h server (Samba %v) log file = ...


1

The ext3 file system also uses a hash (discussion in debian-user). However, IMHO, this can have a bad consequence, at least for a traditional hard disk: this destroys some possible regularity / locality on disk. For instance, when files have been created one after the other in the directory, reading these files in the directory order can be very slow (see ...


1

The only way you can mount a block device on more than one system at the same time is if the block device contains a filesystem designed for this purpose, such as OCFS2. "Normal" filesystems like ext4 or vfat cannot support this. Since the digital camera almost certainly only supports vfat as a filesystem type, it is not possible. There are some products ...


11

A case-insensitive filesystem just means that whenever the filesystem has to ask "does A refer to the same file/directory as B?" it compares the names of files/directories ignoring differences in upper/lowercase (exactly what upper/lowercase differences count depends on the filesystem—it's non-obvious once you get beyond ASCII). A case-sensitive filesystem ...


3

You can't use -o uid=pi,gid=pi with ext4; the following should work: sudo mount /dev/sda1 /media/owncloud -t ext4 The uid and gid options are intended for filesystems which don't track ownership themselves (FAT for example). ext4 is a POSIX filesystem and keeps its own information about file ownership, so it doesn't need (and can't use) uid and gid ...


1

Directories are files because linux systems employ universal i/o model. In the model everything in the system is a file and it can be accessed with same system calls and various commands. They are of special type because their i-nodes have the mark for the file type and they have a special structure of being a table of filenames and links to other i-nodes. ...


2

ext4 since kernel 3.8 supports this: it can store (very) small files within the inode, as described in the filesystem layout documentation. Other filesystems support this on Linux too, or variants of the idea; for example Btrfs stores small files in the parent extent.


0

Probably the best way to handle this is to reboot the system into single user mode, and do the fsck by hand. If, for whatever reason, that's not an option for you, the next best way to handle it is to twiddle a couple of rc.conf knobs. Specifically, these: background_fsck="NO" fsck_y_enable="YES" fsck_y_flags="-f" Reboot, and the rc subsystem should take ...


0

tune2fs is a tool from e2fsprogs for handling ext2/3/4 file systems :) For FreeBSD UFS, tunefs can be used, but it's not able to set anything fsck related. There's a lengthly discussion about forcing fsck after a reboot, the best answer from this thread seems to be "don't" and rely on background_fsck="YES" or force it via /etc/rc.early: echo '/sbin/fsck -y ...


3

A directory is special in that it has the 'd' in its mode, telling the filesystem that it should interpret its contents as a list of other files contained within the directory, rather than a regular file that is just a sequence of bytes to be read by the application. That is all.


2

Here's another script. You can choose whether you want precisely one million files per segment, or precisely 30 segments. I've gone with the former in this script, but the split keyword allows either choice. #!/bin/bash # DIR="$1" # The source of the millions of files TARDEST="$2" # Where the tarballs should be placed # Create the million-file ...


3

I wrote this bash script to do it. It basically forms an array containing the names of the files to go into each tar, then starts tar in parallel on all of them. It might not be the most efficient way, but it will get the job done as you want. I can expect it to consume large amounts of memory though. You will need to adjust the options in the start of the ...


9

My answer is mere reminiscence, but in 199x vintage Unixes, of which there were many, directories were files, just marked "directory" somewhere in the on-disk inode. You could open a directory with something like open(".", O_RDONLY) and get back a usable file descriptor. You could parse the contents if you scrounged through /usr/include and found the ...


12

Many entities in *nix style (and other) operating systems are considered files, or have a defining file-like aspect, even though they are not necessarily a sequence of bytes stored in a filesystem. Exactly how directories are implemented depends on the kind of filesystem, but generally what they contain, considered as a list, is a sequence of stored bytes, ...


11

In the Unix Way of Doing Things: everything is a file. A directory is one (of many) type of special file. It doesn't contain data. Instead, it contains pointers to all of the files that are contained within the directory. Other types of special files: links sockets devices But because they are considered "files", you can ls them and rename them and ...


4

If you can't take the system down for maintenance, that is a very hard task to actually move the system files while they are being used (if at all possible). If you can take the system down for maintenance, I can think of two ways: Booting a rescue system You will need to boot from another system, maybe a rescue disk or something like gparted, then mount ...


-1

What are sticky bits ? A sticky bit is a permission bit that is set on a directory that allows only the owner of the file within that directory or the root user to delete or rename the file. No other user has the needed privileges to delete the file created by some other user. This is a security measure to avoid deletion of critical folders and their ...


-1

firt mount the partition by: sudo fdisk -l or mount sudo umount /dev/sdb1 sudo mkfs.vfat -n usbname -I /dev/sdb1 or sudo mkntfs /dev/sdb1 or any format for example .ext3, .ext4 and ...


0

As Wumpus Q. Wumbley pointed out, there was either a corrupted byte or a whopper of a co-incidence. I decided to bite the bullet and delete the file, which went smoothly with no apparent damage to the surrounding files.


9

You can do this with systemd, so you don't have to install extra software and just have a small amount of extra configuration. Simply add noauto,x-systemd.automount to the options in fstab. noauto to not mount automatically on boot and x-systemd.automount to let systemd mount it on access. Source: ArchWiki - fstab


2

Your file system is very unlikely to be corrupted. Ext4fs, like most Unix file systems supports sparse files, i.e. files which have some of their blocks not backed by any physical media and which blocks by convention are returned as containing only null values (zeroes) when read. Removing a sparse file represent no specific risk, outside the fact it might ...


0

It should be "safe" to delete the file; it is a config file of sorts, telling npm what files and patterns to ignore when you are doing whatever you are doing with npm. Whether you want to delete it or not depends on you. It may be serving a useful purpose. Maybe cat it and see what it contains, and then make a judgement call from there. As @jordanm points ...


0

I found this page, which directed me to hack up my initrd. Once I did that, things began to work. Not sure I understand exactly why I needed to do that, but it's working now. Question... what filesystem(s) should not be mounted with journalling enabled? tmp? swap? others?


17

autofs can do this for you. You can configure any number of mountpoints with various options, and the corresponding filesystems are mounted whenever the mountpoint is accessed. After a given amount of inactivity the filesystems are unmounted again. There are no doubt various ways of using autofs, but here's one way of doing what you're trying to do, based ...


0

If the file system is mounted as type ext3, file system journaling is turned on by default, no need to specify it explicitly. The ext3 file system type can be specified explicitly with the '-t ext3' option to the mount command or in the type column in /etc/fstab. Normally, you should not removed the 'defaults' option for the the root file system in ...


0

I have a potential situation where independent and external hardware can modify a filesystem which is already mounted and in-use on Linux. This is impossible with a local filesystem like Ext4. It's not designed to handle changes that it did not handled by itself, it cannot reconciliate them with its own (memory-based) view of what's on disk. Even if ...


1

You can use the ciopfs stackable filesystem, which implements a case-insensitive filesystem on top of a case-sensitive one. mkdir /tmp/case-sensitive /tmp/case-insensitive ciopfs /tmp/case-sensitive /tmp/case-insensitive TMPDIR=/tmp/case-insensitive myapp fusermount -u /tmp/case-insensitive Ciopfs is a FUSE filesystem, which is available on most Unix ...


3

You can try the following to create a case insensitive filesystem in /tmp: truncate -s 100M /tmp/vfat losetup /dev/loop0 /tmp/vfat mkfs.vfat /dev/loop0 mkdir /mnt/vfat mount /dev/loop0 /mnt/vfat If you don't want to use tmpfs but ramfs instead, create a RAM mount first: mkdir /mnt/ramfs mount -t ramfs -o size=110M ramfs /mnt/ramfs Then follow the steps ...


2

You normally can't remount a filesystem as read-only if processes have a file on it that's open for writing, or if it contains a file that's deleted but still open. Similarly, you can't unmount a filesystem that has any file open (or similar uses of files such as a process having its current directory there, a running executable, etc.). You can use umount ...


4

This is because your test is flawed. Running find . merely calls getdents() on the directory tree. A directory in this case is just a file that contains directory entries and is thus stored in page cache. Note you do nothing to actually access the files you are attempting to cache in this manner. Your test is basically caching all the directories in the ...


0

Out from the box you cannot write to MBR of disk, which is the one FreeBSD boots from. After setting sysctl kern.geom.debugflags=16 you get allowed to shoot in the foot and write to MBR. It's useful to backup and restore MBR or bootcode. The only way to write into MBR without touching this sysctl is to boot your FreeBSD in single-user mode and work with ...


1

by default the mount command displays a list of media devices currently mounted on the system.There are four pieces of information the mount command provides: The device location of the media The mount point in the virtual directory where the media is mounted The file-system type The access status of the mounted media as in your example output of mound ...


0

Try to use UUID instead of using device name. Because the name of this device (/dev/sda3) depends on the order in which it was detected while booting, and this order can change. Type this command "blkid" without quote, the shell will display all the devices with UUID. Refer below: [admin@localhost ~]$ blkid /dev/sda2: ...


0

Filename is stored in the "directory" data structure which has "(string)filename" and the corresponding "(int) inode". directory is responsible for mapping filename --> inode. and in ode is responsible for mapping inode --> sector on disk.


3

The offset option of mount does not get passed to mount directly, but to losetup which sets up a loop device which refers to the offsetted location of the underlaying block device. Mount then performs its operations on that loop device rather than the raw block device itself. You can also use losetup to make resize2fs play which such file systems: # ...


0

Well if you have license to some disk cloning tools, use them to do a disk-to-disk clone on a virtual PC is usually much faster (if they do understand the semantic of the FS instead of verbatim copying). (I use Symantec Ghost for my Windows guest VMs but I'm not sure if it supports EXT filesystems.)


1

I assume you're referring to a btrfs raid1 filesystem created on top of two block devices created with something like mkfs.btrfs -L Raid1 -d raid1 /dev/sd* /dev/sd* Reproduced this setup locally (based on Funtoo instructions from here): $ dd if=/dev/zero of=/tmp/btrfs-vol0.img bs=1G count=1 $ dd if=/dev/zero of=/tmp/btrfs-vol1.img bs=1G count=1 $ sudo ...


1

Are you sure that it’s the “S” that’s causing the problem?  As I explained in my answer to your previous question, the “l” signifies that your operating system and filesystem support mandatory file locking, and mandatory file locking is enabled for this file.  I doubt that it’s a coincidence that both files you give as examples (in this question and the ...


1

The exact answer depends on your filesystem - but in short, your data is stored in blocks. Your filesystem's metadata contains pointers to those blocks. It's OK if those blocks aren't consecutive - if your pointers are to block 3,4,5,6 it's no different than if they point to 3,28,110,45. It's only the number of blocks that determines how much space is ...


2

The short answer is that encrypted volumes are not really more at risk. The encrypted volumes have a single point of failure in the information at the beginning of the volumes that maps the password (or possibly several passwords for systems like LUKS) to the encryption key for the data. (That is why it is a good idea to encrypt a partition and not a whole ...


0

Another option is to give the drive a label and put that into /etc/fstab e.g. exfatlabel /dev/sdc1 EXTERNAL nano /etc/fstab LABEL=EXTERNAL /mnt/external exfat-fuse *options* 0 0


1

To list the detailed inode usage for '/' use the following command : echo "Detailed Inode usage for: $(pwd)" ; for d in find -maxdepth 1 -type d |cut -d\/ -f2 |grep -xv . |sort; do c=$(find $d |wc -l) ; printf "$c\t\t- $d\n" ; done ; printf "Total: \t\t$(find $(pwd) | wc -l)\n"


0

MTP stands for Media Transfer Protocol, the stuff in brackets seems to be an address of a certain USB device in Xubuntu and /Storage is obviously a folder on that device. I'm not sure you could access it via terminal but you could check if FUSEfs would help you. Otherwise just find a software which work with data via MTP. I'm sure Xubuntu would have standard ...


1

I think your confusing mount points and filesystem semantics. The answer is yes though. Symbolism has nothing to do with file systems or mount points. See http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symbolic_link


1

Sure can, unless target/source filesystem do support soft links.



Top 50 recent answers are included