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7

Since your partition seems larger than your filesystem, try growing the filesystem: resize2fs /dev/sda1


3

It's hard links to directories that can break the filesystem structure. Hard links to other types of files aren't a problem. For example: mkdir foo ln foo foo/self rmdir foo rmdir foo doesn't actually remove the directory since it has a remaining link — the self entry inside foo itself. foo has become detached from the filesystem; it can't be reached ...


3

If there is an available module for the file system you want to mount but it's not yet loaded and hence isn't yet shown in /proc/filesystems, then it will be loaded on-demand which it why you don't have any problem mounting. After having mounted such a file system, then that file system type should have appeared in /proc/filesystems. Hence it is a "list of ...


3

Gedit reads the file into memory then closes the file handle. Typically: open("/path/to/your/file", O_RDONLY|O_LARGEFILE|O_NOATIME) = 18 read(18, "blah blah blah"..., 4096) = 305 close(18) = 0 or some mmap or other way. (Not sure how exactly it reads files, but point is that it does not keep the files open.) After this it keeps ...


3

The structure is entirely dependent on the specific filesystem being used, and the only way to read it is by directly reading from the disk ( i.e. /dev/sda1 ), and interpreting the filesystem yourself.


2

A hardlink is by definition a link to an inode. Multiple hardlinks to an inode hence do not need additional inodes... The only thing that will increase inode usage is that for each "generation" the directory tree itself will be duplicated, so for each directory in each generation an additional inode will be needed, whether files are changed or not. That ...


2

A programming interface exposes the directory entry as a special type of stream, handled by functions opendir, readdir, closedir and other related functions. The file entry that you get out of it is described in the man page (it contains file inode and some other data): http://linux.die.net/man/3/readdir Anything more low level than that will depend on the ...


2

The used space reported by df is reserved space. This reserved space is used by ext filesystems to prevent data fragmentation as well as to allow critical applications such as syslog to continue functioning when the disk is "full". You can view information about the reserved space using the tune2fs command: # tune2fs -l /dev/mapper/newvg-root tune2fs ...


1

backups tend to contain lots of identical files, so if you're doing a file-copy type backup (eg using rsync) something that inherently de-duplicates could be a win. ZFS with its hash based de-duplications would be a candidate for this,


1

What you have: a single disk, 193GB in size, known to the system as /dev/sda inside there is one primary partition, taking up all the disk space, known as /dev/sda1 this partition is formatted as ext3, and is mounted as the root of your filesystem: / I suggest using gparted if you have a graphical environment on that host, it is much more intuitive to ...


1

The simple answer is that what you want to do is to read the directory file, with a command like cat ., cat /etc, or cat mydir.  Of course, since this is "raw" data, you'd want to use a program that's better suited to displaying non-ASCII data in a human-friendly way; e.g., hexdump or od. Unfortunately, as discussed in When did directories stop being ...


1

The normal file permissions are OK. But the trailing dot in the permission field drwxrwx--x. [...] /var/www/dropbox shows that there is a SELinux security context for this directory. If SELinux is active (which can be checked by the command sestatus) then this may prevent the access. I am not familiar with SELinux, though. Thus I cannot tell you how to ...


1

Apparently you just created the array. The copying of files has nothing to do with it. Both disks are supposed to always contain the same data, so when you first create the array, the entire contents of the first drive has to be copied to the second to ensure they are identical. After that finishes, then writing data just writes to both drives at the same ...


1

An orphaned inode is one that has been unlinked but is still open in another process. For example running tail -f {file} in one shell followed by rm {file} in another. The filesystem keeps track of these so they can be cleaned up when the process quits. See this note on Ext4 Disk Layout.


1

If you do: mount -t type /dev/somedev /dir/somedir you mount the device file somedev on the directory somedir. somedir is and stays a directory, the access to the device "redirects" via the mount point to the somedev device. To answer your second question ( have corresponding device file somewhere) directly: yes it does it is somedev that you use for ...


1

A list of file system using a block device as backing storage can be obtained from /proc/filesystems. For example you could use it as follows: mount -t "$(grep -v '^nodev' /proc/filesystems | cut -f2 | paste -s -d ,)" Since you want both file systems backed by a block device and network file systems, it does not completely eliminate the need to maintain a ...


1

As Dubu points out in a comment, the issue lies in your relative paths. I had a similar problem symlinking my nginx configuration from /usr/local/etc/nginx to /etc/nginx. If you create your symlink like this: cd /usr/local/etc ln -s nginx/ /etc/nginx You will in fact make the link /etc/nginx -> /etc/nginx, because the source path is relative to the link's ...



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