Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

You can't convert, but can reformat the partition. Boot into Ubuntu or from a live CD and format the partition from there. Be careful not to format the wrong partition. mkfs.ext3 /dev/hdx1


6

Iff by an .ext3 file you understand a filesystem image, then the process can be as follows: create the image file, e.g. with dd: $ dd if=/dev/zero of=image.ext3 bs=1M count=256 this creates a 256MB file filled with zeros. create a filesystem on in that file: $ mkfs.ext3 image.ext3 loop-mount the filesystem somewhere, extract the tarball there, ...


4

For some file systems like ext4 or btrfs on Linux, you can use filefrag to get the offsets of the data segments for the file on the block device the file system is on. $ seq 1000 > a $ filefrag -v a Filesystem type is: ef53 File size of a is 3893 (1 block of 4096 bytes) ext: logical_offset: physical_offset: length: expected: flags: 0: ...


3

Don't do this, the directory is owned by libselinux1 and some packages depend on it. You should not remove files or directories provided by the package manager. Proven on my Debian system (7.6) To find out, which package owns a path on your system, use $ dpkg -S /selinux/ libselinux1:amd64: /selinux $ sudo apt-get remove libselinux1 ..... The following ...


3

Comparing filesystem structures We want to compare filesystem structures looking for non-aesthetic differences. We compare hierarchical filesystems with a tree structure of directories, with flat filesystems that have only one place that contains all files, similar to a single directory with no subdirectories. The two main types of differences are in CPU ...


3

If the filesystem is ext2, ext3 or ext4, then you can use the command tune2fs to find out particulars about a given filesystem on a device. $ sudo tune2fs -l <dev> Example $ sudo tune2fs -l /dev/sda2 tune2fs 1.42.8 (20-Jun-2013) Filesystem volume name: <none> Last mounted on: /boot Filesystem UUID: ...


2

make a new file in /bin called treesize chmod +x /bin/treesize paste this in it. #/bin/sh du -k --max-depth=1 | sort -nr | awk ' BEGIN { split("KB,MB,GB,TB", Units, ","); } { u = 1; while ($1 >= 1024) { $1 = $1 / 1024; u += 1 } $1 = sprintf("%.1f %s", $1, Units[u]); ...


2

Check if your version of mc is compiled with subshell feature. You can check this by running: $ mc -V ... With subshell support as default ... A quick Google search returns the following 2 results: Re: no subshell in mc with screen MC doesn't give a subshell for normal users On my laptop, when I hit ctrl+o, I can see in the strace output that the ...


1

The links you give explicitly state: The st_blocks field indicates the number of blocks allocated to the file, 512-byte units. So they're always in units of 512-byte blocks, regardless of what underlying device is used. The stat command simply displays what the stat system call returns. The 512-byte block is a historic thing, defined in POSIX. Compare for ...


1

I have no idea if there is a specific tool for that, but if I'd really want to figure it out, I'd make something like (in a script/program, of course) : count the files and multiplicate that by the cluster size. Of course, I would need to check their "range" (I mean see their size and check if it would take 4, 8, 32 or 64 KB cluster-wise). It's just an ...


1

mkfs.vfat -s 64 /dev/scd1 Suppose you want to format with 64 sector per cluster, yes you can do it with above command. /dev/scd1 is relative to your device.


1

You can instruct the filesystem to perform an immediate fsck upon being mounted like so: Method #1: Using /forcefsck You can usually schedule a check at the next reboot like so: $ sudo touch /forcefsck $ sudo reboot Method #2: Using shutdown You can also tell the shutdown command to do so as well, via the -F switch: $ sudo shutdown -rF now NOTE: The ...


1

This is not possible. Please also explain what do you mean by "Most recent versions of most Linux distros": as far as I know, spaces are supported since the very first version of UNIX System V filesystem made in 1974.


1

See these 2 pages for a bit more information; they are a bit dated, but should answer some of your questions as far as I can tell: https://www.debian-administration.org/article/643/Migrating_a_live_system_from_ext3_to_ext4_filesystem https://ext4.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Ext4_Howto#Converting_an_ext3_filesystem_to_ext4



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible