Hot answers tagged

5

Do not add yourself to the root group, this many have many unintended side effects granting more than you intended. These directories are intentionally not writable by normal users. In the event you need to make manual changes to them (which will be rare), you can perform those operations as root via sudo.


5

The history is in ~/.local/share/recently-used.xbel but it is not sufficient to remove that file. If you do the Recent Files entry keeps on showing the files you accessed, and if you open a file with an application that creates an Recent Files entry, that and the old list of files will be written to that file again. What you want to do is make an alias or ...


4

I can only address the first part of your question: You can view the dimensions of an image on the command line by the using the identify tool, part of the the imagemagick package. (To install imagemagick on a Debian box, provided you have sudo privileges, you can run sudo apt-get install imagemagick ). For example, in a directory with image file rose.jpg, ...


3

Not sure what you are doing wrong but the following works: for i in *; do cp "$i" $(date '+%Y%m%d')"$i"; done (you should only run this once in a directory)


2

find /path -type f -print0 | xargs -0 dos2unix --


2

Came looking for a one-liner on MacOS. Settled on the following. Compiled and added this tool to my path. This took less then 30 seconds. $ git clone git@github.com:sschober/kqwait.git $ cd kqwait $ make $ mv kqwait ~/bin $ chmod +x ~/bin/kqwait Next, I went to the directory in which I wished to do the watching. In this case, I wished to watch a markdown ...


2

There are number of tools that will do this: identify from ImageMagick jhead jpeginfo some versions of the file command If these programs are not installed, note that both jhead and jpeginfo are quite simple and presuming a compiler is available will be easy to build in your own user account.


2

You can use the commande file e,g: file images.jpg the output is something like : images.jpg: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, aspect ratio, density 1x1, segment length 16, baseline, precision 8, 342x147, frames 3 OR rdjpgcom -verbose images.jpg sample output JPEG image is 342w * 147h, 3 color components, 8 bits per sample JPEG process: ...


1

You can use find to find all of the files in a directory structure that you want to run through your dos2unix command find /path/to/the/files -type f -exec dos2unix {} \; Take a look at the man pages for find, there are a lot of options that you can use to specify what gets evaluated


1

The answer is no. All files outside of home directories are not owned by root. There is a rich and complex set of users and groups, and permissions, on files outside of user home directories for a number of reasons, some historical, and some security related. However, tar implementations have two usual modes, they either, restore files and directories ...


1

Most but not all files that are part of the system are owned by the root user. It's rare for system files not to be owned by root, because a user that owns system files can modify them and this is usually not desirable. It's a lot more common to have files that are owned by a group other than root, and that have mode 660 or 664 or 640. It's possible to ...


1

If you have a ext2/3/4 filesystem you can use debugfs for a low-level look at an inode. For example, to play without being root: $ truncate -s 1M myfile $ mkfs.ext2 -F myfile $ debugfs -w myfile debugfs: stat <2> Inode: 2 Type: directory Mode: 0755 Flags: 0x0 Generation: 0 Version: 0x00000000 User: 0 Group: 0 Size: ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible