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21

I use scp. scp source desthost:/path/to/dest/. to copy from the local machine to the remote machine, or scp srchost:/path/to/file/file . to copy from a remote machine to the local machine. If the username is not the same on the remote machine, scp user@srchost:/path/to/file/file .


10

You should try rsync instead of cp: rsync -avz linux_path /mnt/windows_share/ and crontab instead of the perl loop: crontab -e and add the following line to it: * * * * * rsync -avz linux_path /mnt/windows_share/ It's going to be executed every minute, and if that's an option in your case, it's more robust than the while loop.


8

While technically using Samba, Nautilus uses gvfs, which uses FUSE to mount the SMB share using libsmbclient, you aren't actually mounting the filesystem as you would with the mount command. When you use Nautilus with SMB mounts, a background process gvfsd-smb is started. You can access the mountpoint in ~/.gvfs/, where there's a directory in there with a ...


8

You have several directories that are mounted over other directories (the second mount on /mnt/arcserver shadows the first one and so on, and the mounts on /mnt shadow the prior mounts on /mnt/arcserver). This is confusing both for humans and to the umount command. Unmount them from the bottom up: umount //10.49.4.20/Released umount //10.49.4.20/released ...


7

What you're looking for is AutoFS. Install the RPM, then make sure that it's running at start(RH/etc: chkconfig autofs on). Edit the file /etc/auto.master and add the following line: /media/ /etc/auto.media. If I were you, I would change "media" in both places to be the name of your root-level directory. Then edit the file /etc/auto.media and add ...


7

NTFS does have file permissions. Either you squashed them through mount options or you used consistent user mappings or you made your files world-accessible. If you use a filesystem whose driver doesn't support user mappings, you have several options: Arrange to give corresponding users the same user IDs on all operating systems. Make files ...


7

Samba If you want to share files stored on Linux Linux, install a Samba server on the Linux machine. Follow the documentation (Red Hat 6, CentOS 5, Ubuntu). If you want to share files from Windows, your file manager on Linux can probably connect to a Windows share with no extra effort on your part. Try browsing smb:///. If you want access from the command ...


6

Bad form, I know, to answer my own question, but.... I needed a couple more steps, outlined here. In short, I needed to execute: sudo nfsd update As another detail, I added the client name to the export and removed the "-rw" flag.


6

I don't think you should be using /mnt in this way. According to the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard; This directory is provided so that the system administrator may temporarily mount a filesystem as needed. The content of this directory is a local issue and should not affect the manner in which any program is run. This directory must not be used by ...


6

I usually mount a directory through ssh via FUSE and sshfs. Mount: $ sshfs name@server:/path/to/dir /path/to/mount/point Unmount: $ fusermount -u /path/to/mount/point


5

nfs could be useful. The Network File System (NFS) allows a client node to perform transparent file access over the network. By using NFS, a client node operates on files residing on a variety of servers and server architectures, and across a variety of operating systems. File access calls on the client (such as read requests) are converted to NFS ...


5

I use netcat (if I don't need security) nc -l -p 1234 < send_file # 'server' nc x.y.z.t 1234 > receive_file # 'client'


5

An easy way is to mount the share using SAMBA. After installing samba you can mount the share as follow: mount -t cifs -o username=user,password=secret //server.com/share /mount/point There is a guide for openSUSE that appears via Google. See man mount.cifs for more options.


5

For OS X look for your share name under /Volumes (it may have a "-digit" at the end if you have many mounts with the same name). The same goes for mounted CD/DVDs and disk images.


5

The mimetype in question is: x-scheme-handler/ed2k I just tried it. I installed amule and created a file userapp-amule.desktop in ~/.local/share/applications: [Desktop Entry] Name=aMule Name[en_US]=userapp-amule Exec=amule %u Icon=amule Terminal=false Type=Application Categories=Network;P2P; Comment=A client for the eD2k network ...


5

An SSH server with SFTP service (which comes standard in most SSHD installs), it's also a platform independent solution. The setup is easy: sudo apt-get install ssh should fill in any of the server-side gaps you'd need. On your router, you'd want to map port 22 to the hosting machine, or you could reconfigure SSHD to listen on a different or additional ...


4

The answer is going to depend very much on which of two questions you are actually asking. If you want to share files and directories over a network between a PC running windows and a computer running linux that are on at the same time, Gilles' answer regarding Samba is definitely the way to go. If you're asking how to create a partition/drive on a single ...


4

Try using these socket options on smbclient smbclient --socket-options='TCP_NODELAY IPTOS_LOWDELAY SO_KEEPALIVE SO_RCVBUF=131072 SO_SNDBUF=131072' I regularly copy 40+GB files from Windows to Linux media server without error, typical transfer rate is 85MB/s with machines connected via gigabit switch.


4

In Nautilus, select File | Connect to Server ... There are a lot of options to share a file-system over a network in unix/linux. Nautilus supports some of them: ssh, webdav, ftp, smb and others. Obviously, any of these solutions needs that the corresponding daemon is running on remote host. NFS is unix native "standard" way to share a file-system in a lan ...


4

I don't believe this is possible using Windows guests. I usually setup a Samba server on the Linux KVM host and then share a folder out using that to my KVM guests. Filesystem Passthrough The documentation on sharing a KVM host's directory with the KVM guests (Linux) is available here on the virt-manager website. The page is titled: Example Sharing Host ...


4

I found that the command chgrp does the trick: chgrp foo file


3

You could use autofs to mount the share only when it's needed. There is even some documentation for Ubuntu about this.


3

Although I share the printers using Samba, I access them directly using CUPS. Windows works well with the IPP protocol. For postscript output I am using the MS Publisher Imagesetter driver. If you are having problems with printer sharing using Samba, it may be a browsing issue. You need to be able to see your server first. From my wireless network I ...


3

I'd use a different approach and share the files through an access control list on the directory. First make sure access control lists are enabled on the filesystem where the directory resides (make sure that the corresponding entry in /etc/fstab contains acl in the fourth column). Also make sure you have the acl utilities installed (on Debian, install the ...


3

You will have a long list for this. At my workplace we have Cherokee instead of Apache. Cherokee has a nice web admin interface that makes configuration really easy. I also heard about Nginx and lighttpd.


3

Use bindfs. In short it adds more owners to the same folder. It gives you more flexibility and its simple. http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1460472


3

Lighthttpd is lightweight and easy to setup. nginx seems to be the more popular choice nowadays, tho. It really isn't going to make much of a difference either way. I'd just stick with Apache, if you want to tweak it to use less memory try apache2-mpm-worker. sudo aptitude install apache2-mpm-worker Also, since you want all this stuff working 'out of ...


3

If you run coLinux on Windows (through the andLinux distribution or otherwise), you can use it to access any filesystem that Linux supports.


3

You can try PSCP which comes as part of the PuTTY distribution. The usage of pscp is: pscp [user@]host:source target For example, from a Windows cmd prompt, type the following command to transfer a file to your C: drive. pscp username@host:/path/to/file.txt C:\temp\file.txt I don't believe there is a file size limit.


3

Not sure exactly what your question is. Can you be more specific? Specifically, I'm having difficulty parsing I want a /home/shared where raul & ricardo have permission over this folder, maybe www-data and root, but any other user on any linux distro. Do you want to know how to set up a shared folder/partition? If so, you could just set up a ...



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