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20

You either build your own Active Directory-equivalent from Kerberos and OpenLDAP (Active Directory basically is Kerberos and LDAP, anyway) and use a tool like Puppet (or OpenLDAP itself) for something resembling policies, or you use FreeIPA as an integrated solution. There's also a wide range of commercially supported LDAP servers for Linux, like Red Hat ...


11

I have had luck using PowerNap (it is packaged for ubuntu-sever, but the source is there so you should be able to compile it on anything) to suspend backup machines when they aren't doing anything. However, this won't wake them up automatically. There is also a PowerWake program bundled with the PowerNap source tarball (packaged as powerwake in Ubuntu) ...


11

A user's home directory is the initial directory when a user logs in. Normally the user may create files and directories only in in home directory (apart from temporary directories). Also various settings (user specific startup files and such) are usually stored in the user's home directory. Server is just annother name for a host (a computer). Think of a ...


9

Here's a couple: run Linux as your primary operating system, on both your desktop and your laptop, if any install KVM and virt-manager and build a couple of virtual machines build a package for your distro of choice (a .deb or .rpm file); it helps in understanding a lot of things build your own kernel These might not seem directly related to your own ...


8

Mount the NFS-share on the clients using the mount-options "bg,intr,hard". Most important in your case is "bg" for background - which tells the system not to block when the server is not available. "intr" for interrruptable - so you can kill hanging mounts on the client with the kill command. "hard" is the opposite of "soft". The difference is that "hard" ...


8

I'm not sure how "on topic" this question is but I think that it is fun. The more of your computing that you move into Linux, the faster you will start to pick things up. Here is something I did shortly after moving to using Linux exclusively. It requires having a spare computer. Set up a server with Ubuntu Server. Set up SSH access to the server. ...


6

OS X can do this now, as of Snow Leopard. It's made possible through the Sleep Proxy Service. It's pretty much automatic. The only requirement is that you have a second always-on Apple device on your LAN that can act as the sleep proxy. Their current low-power embedded boxes all support this, I believe: Airport, Time Machine, and Apple TV. In the ...


4

If you just want centralised authentication, look at NIS or NIS+ (formerly known as yellow pages which is why all the commands begin with 'yp'). Configure your main server as the master NIS server, then configure all the other boxes to use NIS to authenticate users. The wikipedia page for NIS is here: ...


4

Scriptonaut, probably your problem has nothing to do with Samba, but has to do with port forwarding/NAT. If you have your SAMBA serving Debian computer in a LAN network, behind a router, you need it configured to transfer requests to some of its ports to your SAMBA running machine: First, I'll tell, how outgoing connections work with router. When 2 ...


3

You will need to do a double symlink similar to what /etc/alternatives does on Ubuntu namely: Inside ~ you will have a link: linked_directory -> /<local filesystem>/linked_directory On each of the local machines: /<local filesystem>/linked_directory -> /<actual location>/linked_directory As long as neither /<local ...


3

I challenge you to configure a secure mail, file and web servers. Does that help? Sounds like you've done a good job of coming up with your own challenges. Do those first, then think of something new. Rinse, repeat.


2

You can use Fish or SFTP to transfer files between computers, with minimal prior setup. Both protocols transfer files over SSH, which is secure and encrypted. They are very well integrated into KDE: you can type fish:// or sftp:// URLs into Dolphin's Location Bar, or you can use the "Add Network Folder" wizard. SFTP at least seems to be supported by Gnome ...


2

Install Samba and create network Samba shares on your primary Ubuntu server so you can connect all your Ubuntu and Windows PCs to the same network folder. See documentation here.


2

Totally unsupported -you gotta pay the Apple tax otherwise- but perfectly doable: http://www.kremalicious.com/2008/06/ubuntu-as-mac-file-server-and-time-machine-volume/


2

There are a few hack-ish options out there, see here, and here. But I certainly wouldn't do it. This is a hack, it's not supported by apple in anyway and there is no guarantee that the next OS X update won't break it and if it does you're stuck with your backups in a network share that is pretty much useless at that point; perhaps if you only need the ...


2

Symlinks will not help, since they are written to the filesystem -- and so they will always be the same on both machines. However, if your administrator installed bindfs, you can mount different things on both machines. For example, on local, you use sshfs to mount compile:/opt/foo/ with ~/foo/ as the mount point. On compile, you use bindfs to mount ...


2

Unix lets you mount filesystems, including remote filesystems, under directories on your system. This is similar to the way you can attach a remote filesystem as a drive on your windows machine, e.g. creating a Z: that refers to \\server\folder. Instead of using drive letters, we have directories that refer to filesystems. So /folder could be a remote mount ...


2

I noted for myself that I have to set public = yes However I don't have Windows any longer and cannot test if that makes the difference, please tell


2

I looked and did not find any offering that provided just a web app interface to an existing slocate database file. So you have the following options: Roll your own. Shouldn't be too difficult use a CGI based approach which would allow users to search for entries in your pre-built slocate database file. Skip using the slocate database file and use a ...


1

How can I write a script which will both 1. run the two programs in parallel, 2. allow me to get output from one to the other properly, 3. allow me to store the output in a nice format for later viewing. Personally, I'd write the test harness in C++ too, but either way, if you want to do this kind of multiple process client server test you need to ...


1

To connect to your share using CLI interface, you need to install smbclient (Samba client). Then you can access your windows machine like the following: smbclient //MIKE-SERVER -U <your_windows_credentials> and you will be prompted for a password.


1

I found that this happened because I was already logged in with a different account to the same network but a different shared directory. I left out other directories since posting the whole config was a bit too much, or so I thought.. It appears, as the error says, you can only be connected to the shared directories with one user at the same time. Adding ...


1

You pretty much have to trust the administrators of a service with the data you upload to it. Any assertion that a service provider cannot see data provided to it is dubious at best (speaking as a security professional). Even if the provider restricts access or encrypts data, you still have to trust their access restrictions (and usually they will ...


1

You could look into Autofs (ArchWiki link). If you setup the NFS to automount, the client should try to (re)connect to the NFS drive every time you try to use it. This would ensure that if you try to access the NFS drive from the client and the server is up, then the NFS drive will attach.


1

I figured it out, I had two problems: I didn't realize that a samba password needs to be assigned for each user The line group = group1 needed to be changed to write list = @group1


1

Actually, if you just have problem with running the GUI there's no need to install another distribution, simply modify the startup sequence to prevent the graphical interface from coming up and work from the command line as you desire. I don't have access to a system right now, but I believe the script you'll need will be found in the /etc/init.d or ...


1

Using any mount system, you want to avoid situations where Nautilus lists the directory containing a mount that may or not be mounted. So, with autofs, don't create mounts in, for instance, /nfs. If you do, when you use Nautilus to list the 'File System' it will try to create whatever mounts should exist in /nfs, and if those mount attempts fail it takes ...


1

I played around some more with some of the options from the man page. All of bg,hard, bg,soft, fg,hard and fg,soft give me return times of over two minuets. Setting retrans=1,retry=0 (combined with any of the above) though, gives me times around three seconds. Pretty decent. Although I'm not quiet sure what each combination means. Will dig around further. ...


1

If you're really just trying to share files from one server to a few other machines, you may just want to use something simpler like Samba (especially if you're interoperating with some Windows clients) or NFS shares.


1

For serving files to Windows machines you need Samba. Samba can also handle user identities, but I think that Samba's passwords and access rights are entirely separate from those of regular Linux users. This piece of documentation makes me think so, go to "Samba as a Primary Domain Controller". Disclaimer: I have really no knowledge on the subject. I have ...



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