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21

Thanks to @derobert for recommending the Dragbox application to me. Dragbox does exactly what I need. For example, I have a folder with a number of .png files that I would like to be able to drag into Chromium. Inside that folder, executing dragbox *.png creates this window: I can use my mouse to drag files from there into Chromium, and it works ...


12

Everyone uses what one finds best for a given task. This is almost completely individual, there cannot be a general answer. Linux users do not need to learn shell operations at all if they don't feel like (and don't get forced to by some situation). And the other way around: one can perform all the needed tasks using only the command line (no file managers ...


12

computer:/// is a special location that the GVFS daemon responds to. For more information on what GVFS is, see What is gvfs and why should I want it on my system?, but suffice it to say that it's a wrapper over the raw POSIX calls for reading, listing, and writing files, and it provides some nice abstractions. Visiting computer:/// will work in any ...


8

Dolphin looks like what you are looking for: But the terminal is a slave of its directory navigation (if you change the directory in the GUI, it changes in the terminal, but not the other way around). To change the application directory when you change the current directory in the terminal, you can make your shell send a message to Dolphin to update its ...


6

Terminal Method Usually when copying files that I think I'll need to pause/resume I'll go to the terminal and use the rsync command instead. $ rsync -avz <source> <destination> This can be paused/resumed in the sense that you can simply stop it, and restart the command later on. Only the files that haven't been copied as of yet, will get ...


5

Sometimes it is nice to just klick around a watch things. And sometimes you actually want to get something done and then you start a shell. So it is a matter of taste if you like the gui filemanagers or not. But I would not say it is a luxury thing.


5

From the Arch Linux Wiki: You can trick GNOME into using another file browser by editing the Exec line in /usr/share/applications/nautilus.desktop. See the correct parameters in the .desktop file of the file manager of your choice, e.g.: /usr/share/applications/nautilus.desktop [...] Exec=thunar %F OR Exec=pcmanfm %U [...] Arch Linux Wiki 1


5

I had exactly the same problem a few months back and ultimately just wrote a tool to do it for me. When I saw this and found someone else had the same itch I cleaned it up so that someone other than me could actually get it running, and finished off my to-do list. The code is up now: https://github.com/mwh/dragon To get it, run git clone ...


4

In order to create 'Open folder as root' context menu command - and in order to create any new such command - a new *.contract file has to be creaetd in /usr/share/contractor. For 'Open folder as root' - that file would have to contain something like [Contractor Entry] Name=Open folder as root Icon=gksu-root-terminal Description=Open folder as root ...


4

If you've just downloaded the user script and its name is appearing in the bottom bar, open the Extensions page (Menu > Tools > Extensions, chrome://chrome/extensions/), then drag-and-drop from the download bar to the middle of the Extensions page. (Thanks to balpha for this method.) If you've got the script on your system somewhere, you can use ...


4

For some reason, the drag-and-drop mechanisms in both Nautilus and Konqueror do not work properly with the extension manager in Google Chrome / Chromium. I've found two solutions: To force the issue, you can use an alternative file manager. I found that the one from the XFCE project called thunar works for me and can be run inside of either Gnome, KDE or ...


4

I use a file manager quite rarely. When I went from Windows to OpenBSD I tried to learn "the unix way" so I got very familiar with the shell and such. Now however I've came to realize that shells are very handy, but in some cases they can't beat graphical file managers. I use a graphical file manager when: Dealing with long or "difficult"(spaces, etc) ...


4

To change the default filemanager you can edit the file ~/.local/share/applications/mimeapps.list Don't know how to specify thunar but to use nemo over nautilus I do this: thomas@localhost ~> cat .local/share/applications/mimeapps.list [Added Associations] inode/directory=nemo.desktop; Also if you are curious why the wrong filemanager is started if ...


4

You can easily navigate the filesystem within your browser, using the syntax: file:///home/username/blah/blah Open the path in an empty tab and from there you can drag and drop your file. At least with chrome/chromium, don't have other browsers here to try.


3

Nautilus Terminal is a plugin for Nautilus (Gnome's file manager). The directories don't follow the command line, but it's reasonably quick to do pwd | xclip, <Ctrl> +<l>, <Ctrl>+<v>


3

Gnome Commander is a file manager with a shell command line line at the bottom. Midnight Commander (mc) is similar, but in text mode. (Both get their inspiration from Norton Commander.)


3

I figured out a hack. Since the launchers that come with EasyPeasy can be right clicked and then added to Favorites; I did that with one of them. Then I ran gconf-editor and in it navigated to /apps/netbook-launcher/favorites. I found the folder containing the launcher I just added, double clicked on its key named desktop_file and changed its value to ...


3

There is some helpful documentation in /usr/local/share/vifm/vifm-help.txt and /usr/local/share/vifm/vifm.txt -- in addition to the man page. The Arch wiki also has a Vifm page with some tips on using it. Essentially, as the name suggests, it is like using Vim for managing your files. Copy or move is yy or d and p. Edit is e. As it is programmable, you ...


3

Yes, IIRC. I believe it can be used for FTP, though I'm not 100% sure. What I suspect it's talking about, though, is Samba shares. (It may also be able to do sshfs but I'm not sure.) All the magic happens through GVFS (or whatever the MATE guys called the GNOME 2 equivalent, GVS, when they forked it).


3

The shortcut is shown in the View menu : Ctrl+M


3

This is documented (at least for gnome-shell/nautilus) in gvfs-udisks2-volume-monitor: The gvfs-udisks2-volume-monitor process is responsible for the disks, media, mounts and fstab entries shown in the desktop user interface. .......................................... A device is either mounted (in which case its directory is known) or it's not. If the ...


2

Under Thunar file manager, you can add to the shortcut pane by dragging items there as shown in the Thunar documentation.


2

Nemo does (in so far as I just tried this and it worked), but it's really part of Cinnamon which is a replacement for the Gnome 3 shell. It does not appear to have any dependencies on Cinnamon, however. It is in the repos for Fedora 17+ and Mint, of course. Probably others as well. Github if you need the source. On a further note, I had no idea about the ...


2

No, (at least in pcmanfm) they are not stored as symlinks; they are stored in .gtk-bookmarks, a plain text file, like so: file:///home/jason/Music Music file:///home/jason/Videos Videos


2

There is an instance of Nautilus running behind the scenes that's managing your desktop, so when you run subsequent instances of Nautilus the --no-desktop is telling Nautilus not to try to manage the desktop icons etc. The %U means to pass in a list of URLS: %U A list of URLs. Each URL is passed as a separate argument to the executable program. ...


2

I had the same issue. Kodak cameras by default present themselves as PTP cameras, not as USB mass storage devices to the USB host. This gives you two possibilities: use the camera's menu to switch it to something like "USB mass storage device" instead of something like "PTP camera" use the software gphoto2 to obtain pictures from your PTP camera. If you ...


2

No Trash can typically handle anything. The problem is likely more that your userid does not have permissions to move these particular files and/or directories from /var/tmp. To confirm drop to a shell and cd /var/tmp and check who the owner is of these files as well as the permissions on these files. $ ls -la /var/tmp Example $ ls -la total 216 ...


2

Passing xdg-open a directory name should open the file manager: xdg-open ~/


2

Well, that's easy. It can't be done, not without compiling from source. I would just move the directories and create symlinks instead from where the directories are to where you want them, something like this: mv ~/Music /where/i/want/my/music ln -s /where/i/want/my/music ~/Music



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