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1

Further to my previous answer, I have just released fienode which computes a SHA1 hash of the physical extents of the file and can be used to find some (identical) reflink copies. Beware though, there are caveats (see the documentation). BTRFS decided to change some, but not all, of the physical extents of a refink copy I made without provocation or warning, ...


2

Good question. Looks like there aren't currently any easy high-level ways to tell. One problem is that a file may only share part of the data via Copy-on-Write. This is called a physical extent, and some or all of the physical extents may be shared between CoW files. There is nothing analogous to an inode which, when compared between files, would tell you ...


2

If you stick to filesystem-independent tools, I can't think of a way to do this other than actually allocating the disk space, i.e. reserve would need to create a (non-sparse!) file of the requested size, and you'd need to delete this file before starting rsync. If the files are on an ext2/ext3/ext4 volume and using root access for some operations is ...


0

I found the ans which is at number 3::: 1-by uploading-downloading I went further to check if any online upload-download site supports use of command line, and came across https://transfer.sh site. Using it I transfered my file by uploading and downloading. First upload your file to that site using below command after moving to that folder which ...


2

Instead of using mc, I'd suggest a bit of bash work in conjunction with the find command: id=0; s=.jpg; while read f; do cp $f targetdir/$(basename $f $s)$((id+=1))$s done < <(find sourcedir -name '*'$s) or, as a one-liner: id=0;s=.jpg;while read f; do cp $f targetdir/$(basename $f $s)$((id+=1))$s; done < <(find sourcedir -name '*'$s) ...



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