New answers tagged

1

This is caused by a bug in the SELinux policy. See https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1331668 — as of May 2, 2016, there is an update in testing which should resolve the issue. In the meantime, booting with enforcing=0 will work around the problem.


2

To set up networking for your chrooted session you need to copy the DNS configuration into the chroot environment : cp /etc/resolv.conf /mnt/etc/resolv.conf Or ln -s /etc/resolv.conf /mnt/etc/resolv.conf


1

For the sake of completeness, i will add that this is a problem with selinux-policy and selinux-policy-targeted version 3.13.1-183.fc24. Downgrading these to previous versions or using 3.13.1-184.fc24 fixes this issue. Also see bugzilla entries here and here.


0

A solution So it looks like I have found a working solution given my particular environment. I'll first describe my goals and environment, and then give step-by-step instructions. Goals Side-by-side installation Fedora 23 and Windows 10 in UEFI mode. Environment One hardware-based RAID0 volume, formatted using a GPT partition table. (Let's call ...


2

The solution I used was Change default.target to multi-user.target (Was graphical.) setenforce 0 systemctl isolate graphical


5

This worked for me. Add the following to your kernel parameter. selinux=1 enforcing=0 This sets the SELinux enforcement mode from strict to permissive. This is a temporary solution until I figure out what is going on, or until an update fixes the problem. Hope it helps.


3

This isn't via bash, but the GNOME Shell extension Auto Move Windows lets you define rules so that programs are automatically opened on predefined workspaces. If that doesn't do you what you need, you could consider extending the extension (source here; it's in Javascript) to better fit your specific need.


0

Firstly, your Hadoop command is likely incorrect. dfs -copyFromLocal expects two parameters, a local file (as you have specified) and then an Hadoop URI. Not as you have given it, a file path. From the Hadoop web pages, All FS shell commands take path URIs as arguments. The URI format is scheme://authority/path. For HDFS the scheme is hdfs, and for ...


4

PackageKit is being run by GNOME Software. It's not doing automatic updates, but it is downloading them so they're ready. There is work on making this be smarter, including not doing it over bandwidth-constrained connections, but it hasn't landed yet. In the meantime, you can disable this by running: dconf write /org/gnome/software/download-updates false ...


2

Answering my own question: I was able to solve the problem by restoring the configuration of my /etc/proftpd.conf to AuthOrder mod_auth_pam.c* mod_auth_unix.c SELinux was configured by setting the following flags: setsebool ftpd_full_access 1 setsebool ftp_home_dir 1 Apparently the problem was related with mod_auth_unix.c which is forbidden by SELinux ...


2

There wouldn't be any overwrite issues with rm but whatever the scenario, if you abort during the process, it will blindly stop where it was when it got interrupted. There is unfortunately no way of knowing where it stopped unless you previously made a listing of what should be removed.


0

I had the same symptom, after moving a F23 installation (ssd) to a different motherboard+chipset. The solution was to change the Secure Boot settings in BIOS. It was set to "Windows 7," and I set it to "Other OS." I guess the first motherboard had this setting by default. I became aware that this may be the issue when I tried to reinstall the Nvidia driver ...


1

I believe the FTP server is forbidden to access /etc/passwd or /etc/shadow. This is not true. From the AVC message, you see tcontext=system_u:system_r:ftpd_t:s0-s0:c0.c1023 which is some part of ftpd_t, not shadow or passwd (these files have different context, as you can see from ls -Z /etc/passwd). It is not complete solution, but moving forward. ...


0

Fedora will never, and I mean never upgrade a 64 bit package to 32 bit. It's not possible. Due to Skype being a 32 bit application and packaged as such, it requires 32 bit dependencies. The problem here is that your system was not completely up to date before you installed the package. Your system is now damaged. Also, according to the logs, glibc x86_64 ...


0

Since nobody had any help here, I burned the current Live disc, which had a newer kernel and the patched version of xfsprogs. From the live disc, I was able to run xfs_repair and resolve the issues. this still failed to emergency mode, but I was able to then run xfs_repair from the native install, which allowed me to get back into the system.


0

You can list other networks in cli using nmcli. nmcli con show or nmcli d Then you need to copy your UUID for further connect to the ones-needed interface. nmcli c up uuid <paste uuid here> or nmcli -p con up "my-eth1" ifname eth1 About resources: you can get acquainted at first with this: nmcli, than you can go further and use this ...


4

Your GUI explorer is using information from the avahi daemon which is listening for services on the local network. You can do the same from the cli with avahi-browse -rat


1

If under /opt there are no installed programs (using apt/yum) but only self compiled programs you might be able to get away with that. I have been able to do so for multiple Python versions, but I had made sure that the compiler version on the two distributions were the same. You are probably better of saving space by sharing the VM disc image files (if you ...


0

This command creates metadata cache for downloads: sudo dnf makecache To instruct dnf to be more resource-aware and to terminate immediately if it’s too soon after the last successful makecache run we add timer to it: sudo dnf makecache timer


0

After waiting for several hours dnf still was stuck on Running transaction. However after pressing Ctrl+C numerous times it continued. After it was done installing and verifying it was stuck again. Ctrl+C to the rescue it exited normally and all the updated packaged were installed... I still don't know what happened and also don't see any error in the logs. ...


0

I solved this by writing a simple script. It was a silly solution to a silly problem you might say. I type in 'dnf update' and get all the packages that need to be installed. Copy paste it in a file (should be automated). Use that file in a script to download packages individually. Like 'dnf update package_name'. Since this goes for individual packages, my ...


3

One of the questions you ask is: "Is there a program that provides an x11 xserver inside a window?" It sounds like Xnest might answer that question. Xnest is "A nested X server that runs as an X application". I know that I've used it in the past to show me unusual window managers that I had compiled from source, and didn't want to have crash my whole ...


0

NOTE: without further evidence to confirm my suspicion, this is just hypothetical speculation. You mentioned seeing something about 'readonly'. It's possible that your system encountered unrecoverable corruption or a hardware fault on the disk (or cable or sata interface etc) and remounted the root fs as readonly in order to prevent further ...


2

You can use the other command line options of systemd-analyze to get a better overview about what delays your boot. Your command showed that most of the time is eaten up by userspace processes. Therefore I recommend investigating this further. Take a look at systemd-analyze blame and systemd-analyze plot The first one will give you a per process list ...


0

I am happy to report that CentOS 7-1511 uses Xorg-server 1.17.2, which does not suffer from the accessibility bug. Therefore that version can be used without patching.


2

The java program and the javac alternatives are controlled independently of one another. Take a look at at what alternative you have set for javac. # update-alternatives --config javac There are 2 programs which provide 'javac'. Selection Command ----------------------------------------------- 1 ...


0

On my fedora 22 with dolphin I right click on the file icon which opens a dialog with a list of programs to choose from. If I don't want to use any of those listed I choose 'Other...' which open another dialog where I can browse the whole system to the file I want to use


1

First, let me warn you that upgrading any OS in place has the potential to fail and then cause problems resulting from that failure. Having said that, Fedora 24 is still not yet released, so the latest official release of Fedora is Fedora 23. Instructions for that upgrade can be found at the Fedora Project Wiki. There are multiple methods for performing ...


3

At the risk of reading the linked article author's mind, I think that the following instructions are broken in a few ways: $ su password: # cd /usr/local # wget http://apache.claz.org/hadoop/common/hadoop-2.4.1/ hadoop-2.4.1.tar.gz # tar xzf hadoop-2.4.1.tar.gz # mv hadoop-2.4.1/* to hadoop/ # exit They start off as functioning commands, but the ...


0

If you need to blacklist something temporarily, or prefer to use Grub to do it for some reason, you can also edit your kernel boot options to blacklist the module as well: vmlinuz ro rhgb quiet rdblacklist=<modulename> This can be made permanent by adding it to /etc/default/grub on this line: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="<existing boot options> ...


4

The module might be loaded in the initramfs on boot. You must regenerate the initramfs to include your modifications to /etc/modprobe.d/* Run the following to regenerate your initramfs dracut -f /boot/your-initramfs On reboot, the driver should not be loaded automatically


0

You can get the specific source RPM from Koji, Fedora's build system. In this case, it's at https://kojipkgs.fedoraproject.org/packages/kernel/3.17.7/200.fc20/. (There are multiple ways to find this, but in this case, I simply did a Google search for "kernel-3.17.7-200.fc20.x86_64 koji".) Install the source rpm (as non-root) — install and run ...



Top 50 recent answers are included