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1

shred runs on block devices or files. So it is either (if /dev/sdx is your external HDD): shred -n 1 /dev/sdx Or, in case of a file (if the filesystem is 2TiB large): truncate -s 2T "/media/me/New Volume/shredfile" shred -n 1 "/media/me/New Volume/shredfile" sync rm "/media/me/New Volume/shredfile" The file will not shred the entire HDD, just the free ...


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You need to run shred on the device, not on the mount point. Type mount and get the device name (e.g. /dev/sdb1, likely it will be /dev/sdXY where X is a letter and Y is a number), then unmount it (run umount /your/device) and run shred /your/device.


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You should not have any problem with standard distros, since most of them start user ids from 1000 on and most probably there will always be a user 1000 in every system. By the way, you can use those HDs on Windows. Check this out.


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Whether you may encounter permission problems with external media depends on whether all your machines share the same password and group database (the username-UID and group-GID mappings). Ownership on an ext4 filesystem is stored as UID and GID numbers. A more appropriate but somewhat experimental filesystem you could try is UDF. It has the benefit of ...


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The id of the user that owns the files needs to be present on all machines. That is if you want to access the files as the same user. Root will read anything from anywhere. If you give proper permissions to the files you will need only the same group id all systems. The user accessing the files will need to be in this group.


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I recommend you to use the external HDD. In my opinion you mentioned the most important points. May you could also think about a cloud-backup (dropbox, google drive, etc.). To you thoughts about the external HDD I can just add, that the file system must be accessible by windows an linux (Maybe FAT32).



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