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2

I don't agree with the squashfs recommendations. You don't usually write a squashfs to a raw block device; think of it as an easily-readable tar archive. That means you would still need an underlaying filesystem. ext2 has several severe limitations that limit its usefulness today; I would therefore recommend ext4. Since this is meant for archiving, you ...


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SquashFS is a compressible read-only filesystem that fits your requirements well, has been in the kernel for a few years, and is already widely used (e.g., in LiveCDs). The latest documentation for the userspace tools is on GitHub. From the documentation: Squashfs is a highly compressed read-only filesystem for Linux. It uses either gzip/xz/lzo/lz4 ...


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You'd probably be better served by a compressed filesystem. There are ways of compressing various Linux filesystems (FUSE can do it), but since this will be read-only once you've created it, you might consider squashfs. You create the filesystem with mksquashfs. Linux has had squashfs in the main kernel since 2.6.something, so it should work from pretty ...


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use -T option to print file system type [root@centos6 ~]# df -T Filesystem Type 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/mapper/VolGroup-lv_root ext4 6795192 6367072 76276 99% / tmpfs tmpfs 639164 0 639164 0% /dev/shm /dev/sda1 ext4 487652 28684 433368 7% ...


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A volume is called a "LUKS volume" because it has a LUKS header. Thus if you convert a non-LUKS volume into a LUKS volume then you do get an additional header and do lose data space. The LUKS header can be on a differenct device (--header) but I do not know whether cryptsetup-reencrypt supports that. But most probably you want to have the LUKS header within ...


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I had this problem trying to create a new volume on a brand new 3TB drive. Answer is to create 2 partitions which builds a good superblock then resize the get a single partition of max size. Ray



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