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What does commit really do? I think one of the best explanations was given here by allquixotic. Are there really advantages of increasing it (like responsiveness and power savings)? May it actually cause data loss? As per the ext4 official documentation: Ext4 can be told to sync all its data and metadata every 'nrsec' seconds. The default ...


1

You wrote: It surprises me to see find iterate/walk through the complete filesystem when I do a simple find -inum 12345 find, by definition, does a tree walk starting at the given directory or directories, with a default starting directory of .. find -inum 12345 will walk through the entire directory tree starting with the current working directory. ...


1

There's another similar question and bindfs is suggested there: mkdir /home/$user/sda1 bindfs -u $user -g $group /mnt/sda1 /home/$user/sda1 OSX users suggest noowners mount option described like this: Ignore the ownership field for the entire volume. This causes all objects to appear as owned by user ID 99 and group ID 99. User ID 99 is ...


1

The very simple reason is that at least for the ext2/ext3/ext4 type filesystems the filenames are stored via the directory entries data stored in directory type files. This means that those files that are from type directory have a more or less intricate system to store filenames (of the files inside of the directory) and the inodes which lead to the data ...


-3

UNIX has three syscalls: lstat(),fstat(),stat() All of these system calls return a stat structure, which contains the following fields: struct stat { dev_t st_dev; /* ID of device containing file */ ino_t st_ino; /* inode number */ mode_t st_mode; /* protection */ nlink_t st_nlink; /* number of ...


1

See these 2 pages for a bit more information; they are a bit dated, but should answer some of your questions as far as I can tell: https://www.debian-administration.org/article/643/Migrating_a_live_system_from_ext3_to_ext4_filesystem https://ext4.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Ext4_Howto#Converting_an_ext3_filesystem_to_ext4


2

Take a look at the bindfs package. bindfs is a FUSE filesystem that allows for various manipulations of file permissions, file ownership etc. on top of existing file systems. You are looking specifically for the --map option of bindfs: --map=user1/user2:@group1/@group2:..., -o map=... Given a mapping user1/user2, all files owned by user1 are shown as ...


1

You can use bindfs. It can bind the filesystem to some other mountpoint with different uid/gid. However I think I would just change the uid so it is the same on both systems.


0

It is recommended to perform a fsck unmount this partition /dev/sdb2 if you have nothing important riding on that device, if that does not work try doing a fsck with a live CD. $ sudo fsck /dev/sdb2


1

You can instruct the filesystem to perform an immediate fsck upon being mounted like so: Method #1: Using /forcefsck You can usually schedule a check at the next reboot like so: $ sudo touch /forcefsck $ sudo reboot Method #2: Using shutdown You can also tell the shutdown command to do so as well, via the -F switch: $ sudo shutdown -rF now NOTE: The ...


0

Believe you are requiring to run a fsck kind of operation. You can try running fsck as follows: $ sudo fsck /dev/sdb2



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