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If you know which processes are writing to files in that directory, you can freeze them using kill -SIGSTOP <pid>, do your backup then resume the processes with kill -SIGCONT <pid>.


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To my knowledge, atomicity of such a transaction cannot be guaranteed by ext4 in itself without cooperation from the application that is accessing the data concurrently. Using some snapshot mechanism in an underlying device mapper won't work either, since you'd basically need to unmount the filesystem (or at least remount-ro) in order to obtain a consistent ...


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This is a problem caused by Vim. Vim deletes the files before writing out the new file. This is contrast to e.g. Emacs (and the WingIDE editor) I use. I have noticed this with a small python utility I run when testing new code: it cycles to see if any of a list of files has changed based on their timestamps and then executes some command (usually .py files ...


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Ok...so I had not tried the one thing that was missing: setting the ownership in the mounted device. After manually mounting the device to /mnt/hdd and running sudo chown myuser:myuser /mnt/hdd When I start autofs and access the desired mountpoint it gets mounted with the right permissions.


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First, back everything up, as you should always do when faffing about with partitions. Turn off the swap with swapoff /path/to/swap_partition (optional), boot up a GPartEd LiveCD or other live distro with GPartEd. Remove the swap partition, extend your sda2 partition as desired, and create a new swap partition in the remaining space if desired.


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I use 3 notebooks and I've been using BTRFS on 2 of them for over 4 years now. The last problem with stability (and data loss) I experienced before I switched to kernel 3.3, so for all practical purposes I consider btrfs stable for home use. Unfortunately btrfs is not feature complete: as @Huygens mentioned, it lacks ability to actually heal corrupted ...


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You need to add a label to the partition. To do this, either use a filesystem specific tool, such as e2label for ext2/3/4 or use gparted. For example: #e2label /dev/sda2 Schijf-2 Do NOT mount the partition on a mount point (such as /home/Schijf-2) as it will then be part of that directory tree in your file manager and consequently will not show up. The ...


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By default, if your fstab entry is: UUID=913aedd1... /media/Schijf-2 ext4 rw,relatime 0 2 your partition will not be shown as Schijf-2 in your sidebar, unless it is labelled Schijf-2. You have two options: Leave the fstab entry as is and label your partition (e.g. if sda2 is your partition): e2label /dev/sda2 Schijf-2 Leave the partition ...


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UUID=913aedd1-9c06-46fa-a26e-32bf5ef0a150 /media/Schijf-2 ext4 rw,relatime,discard 0 2 See man fstab for the complete list and description of the options.


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If you care much about battery life, you should not waste cpu time on compression. For example, just browsing the web would cause your system to spend energy on compressing cached data. If you're having storage space issues, consider using remote storage more often (see samba, sshfs, etc). You may still want to use btrfs for it's other features useful to ...



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