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Is there any way I can recover my partition? You cannot recover your partition, in the sense that there is no easy way you can get that partition as it was before your accidental formatting. However, depending on the amount of data that was overwritten, you can recover some (or many) of the files contained inside the partition. To be more precise, you ...


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You don't have to run anything after resizing, but you cannot just resize the logical volume even if you have unmounted the filesystem on it. You have the resize the filesystem first (for ext4 you can use resize2fs), to make sure there are unused blocks in the logical volume that can be freed up (to transfer to swap). This normally requires some calculation ...


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Do you have /sbin in your path? Most likely you are trying to run mkfs.ext4 as a normal user. Unless you've added it yourself (e.g. in ~/.bashrc or /etc/profile etc), root has /sbin and /usr/sbin in $PATH, but normal users don't by default. Try running it from a root shell (e.g. after sudo -i) or as: sudo mkfs.ext4 -L hdd_misha /dev/sdb1 BTW, normal ...


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Finally it turned out that problem was one level below. To be more specific, I had an partition.img image file, on external usb ntfs harddrive. The problem happened to ntfs partition, which started to report 0 free bytes, despite it should have 800GiB... therefore, writes stopped to be possible on underlying drive, so loop-mounted ext4 drive couldn't ...


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Good news: it's expected. The lazytime flag is independent of strictatime/relatime/noatime. And the default is relatime. So when you replaced noatime with lazytime, it's not surprising that you saw the relatime mount option being set. -- Ted Ts'o Unfortunately this doesn't explain what it means. A literal reading of the manpage suggests that ...


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Yes, it's perfectly safe. It's mentioned in the manpage for mount(). Since Linux 2.4 a single filesystem can be visible at multiple mount points, and multiple mounts can be stacked on the same mount point. I think mmp is something else. Something about mounting a block device which is shared between multiple computers. So it's not ...


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Because ext4 is an extension of the ext2 and ext3 filesystems; one of the features that it extended was the use of a journal. References: https://ext4.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Frequently_Asked_Questions#What_is_the_difference_between_ext2.2C_ext3.2C_and_ext4.3F http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/60757/117549


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Some googling told me that there was a patch to ext4 last year that mentions returning EUCLEAN upon an out of space error. E.g. https://patchwork.ozlabs.org/patch/452275/ The fix is either to run e2fsck -E bmap2extent, or to chattr +e the file.


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Given that this is a log file, here's the most likely explanation: There is a process that has the file open and keeps appending to it. Currently that's process 22252, there may have been other processes in the past (previous instances of the same application). At some point in the past, someone truncated the file. Truncating the file to a certain position ...


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It's probably a sparse file, i.e. a file that is largely empty, and where not all the disc blocks needed for the full size have been allocated. Using dd if=/dev/zero bs=1 count=1 seek=1E of=sparse I just made a file with an apparent size of 1 EB and I don't have that much disc space: grove@cassiopeia> ls -lh sparse -rw-r--r-- 1 grove grove 1.1E Apr 10 ...


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Debian installer will show 5 GB as power of 1000 (SI prefix base-10), which means user can immediately know 5 GB is 5*1000*1000*1000 bytes. Before installation Just yesterday, I had Debian 8.2 Xfce desktop release installed on my old test machine. The machine has a 60 GB hard disk, which I had setup manually to create 2.0 GB swap and 10.0 GB ext4 primary ...


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This is not a definitive answer, but looking at the latest sources for partman, which seems to be one of the underlying tools that you are going to be running, it seems only powers of 1000 suffixes are used and understood, so "1GB" means 1000,000,000 bytes. You can browse the sources here, in particular the file base.sh which has the function longint2human ...



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