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5

The easiest way to do this is to create your backing file as a sparse file; that is, make it 1GB with truncate -s 1G disk.img instead of dd if=/dev/zero bs=1048576 count=1024 of=disk.img (or whatever). Nicely, truncate is also far faster. If you do an ls -l on the file, it'll show as 1GB—but that's only its apparent size. du disk.img will give the actual ...


3

What Windows (or more precisely NTFS) calls MFT is what typical Unix filesystems call the inode table, and what Windows calls FRN is the inode number. It contains the metadata for a file (permissions, timestamps, etc.), but not the file name (that's part of the directory entries). It also contains the address of the first few blocks of the file, or the ...


3

Some general comments. You've disabled SMART on both your disks (or at least, you've not enabled it). No tests are being run and none has been run previously. This tells me that there is no way you can know whether or not the disk is faulty. The kernel error message, Add. Sense: Unrecovered read error - auto reallocate failed suggests that the disk is well ...


2

Thanks to @casey for the comments! After running the parted and gdisk commands, it is clear that the disks are healthy so I don't know why the array fails on startup. A colleague recommended running: partprobe /dev/sdb I did that and then reran the mdadm commands and now mdadm can see sdb mdadm -E /dev/sdb /dev/sdb: MBR Magic : aa55 Partition[0] : ...


1

I do not understand what you are really asking but answer is probably: There is supposed to be no difference between filesystems. Syscalls and VFS are filesystem-agnostic. POSIX standard defines most of what file operations do, as far as stat fields are concerned, thus defining when and how atime alike fields are updated. That said, filesystems have their ...


1

The smallest possible allocation size for a file in ext3/ext4 is 0 (none at all) because of inline data: files with sizes smaller than 60 bytes can be stores completely inside the inode itself. Of course, every file, whether it's a regular file, symlink, directory (which can contain data), or character device or block device or named pipe (none of which ...


1

tune2fs -l <filesystem> was what I was looking for. I wrote a command to quickly check the filesystem state for all mounted filesystems: df | awk '/^\/dev/ {print $1}' | xargs -I {} sh -c 'echo {}; tune2fs -l {}' | awk '/^\/dev/ {print $1} /^Filesystem state/ {print $3, " ",$4}'


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I can tell you what the theory is, but no hands on experience. I read that files get pushed from memory to disk only every few seconds, and files that are removed quickly enough never end up on disk. Not even in the journal. I am not sure whether a file needs to exist for full 5 seconds to be pushed out or just happen to exist at the moment of ...


1

use -T option to print file system type [root@centos6 ~]# df -T Filesystem Type 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/mapper/VolGroup-lv_root ext4 6795192 6367072 76276 99% / tmpfs tmpfs 639164 0 639164 0% /dev/shm /dev/sda1 ext4 487652 28684 433368 7% ...



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