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What Windows (or more precisely NTFS) calls MFT is what typical Unix filesystems call the inode table, and what Windows calls FRN is the inode number. It contains the metadata for a file (permissions, timestamps, etc.), but not the file name (that's part of the directory entries). It also contains the address of the first few blocks of the file, or the ...


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First, let's dispel some myths. it is atomic so inconsistencies cannot happen Moving a file inside the same filesystem (i.e. the rename) system call is atomic with respect to the software environment. Atomicity means that any process that looks for the file will either see it at its old location or at its new location; no process will be able to ...


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The rename operation is very fast on any filesystem, so it is unlikely to be interrupted, but on a classical filesystem it certainly can be interrupted - if it creates the destination link first, it could leave two links on a file - which is legal, but the file thinks it only has one, which could cause problems if one is deleted later. On the other hand, if ...


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This question has been asked in a slightly different manner on Super User. The Wikipedia page on the mv command also explains it quite well: Moving files within the same file system is generally implemented differently than copying the file and then removing the original. On platforms that do not support the rename syscall, a new link is added to the new ...



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