Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

The file that you're running has been given the execute permission, but it isn't in a format that the kernel understands, so it can't be executed on your machine. Run file /path/to/the/executable to see what kind of a file it is. This could be an archive that you're supposed to extract, or an executable for a different architecture (e.g. a 64-bit ...


0

$ /home/amnesia/myfile bash: /home/amnesia/myfile: No such file or directory $ file /home/amnesia/myfile ELF 64-bit LSB executable, x86-64, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked (uses shared lies), for GNU/Linux 2.6.9, not stripped So myfile exists, but running it gives the message “No such file or directory”. This happens in the following circumstance: ...


0

I suggest checking the following: Run file /home/amnesia/myfile. This will determine the file type you are trying to execute; Run the script without sudo to get a more meaningful message; If it's something like a shell script, a set -x will also help you figure out what's going on. You can also run the script with sh -x; Could be a broken shebang line (ex: ...


0

if you havent: chmod chmod u+x /home/amnesia/myfile And remove the '.' from the begning. it needed when you in same directory as of file is sudo /home/amnesia/myfile here is demo:


1

Yes, if you build with the exact compiler and library versions specified by the Linux Standards Base. Hardly anybody does this because it means restricting yourself to libraries several years old, and even then you only get a handful of basic system libraries and you still have to bundle a lot of dependencies.


1

What kind is file you can see by following command file xyzexample Executable bit is a different thing. You can see it by ls -l xyzexample or stat xyzexample For simple understanding it the right to execute file by call it just by name xyzexample will execute programm listed in file. Without this bit you are still able to execute it but in ...


2

It is possible without being root but you should set SUID for your program. There is 2 way to do it which are exactly same anyway. chmod u+s [program] chmod 4755 [program] You may want to see SETUID Also If you want to handle this in C : You Should check setuid function And If you want to do it in bash : You should check setuid on shell scripts


4

To give a binary permission to run things as root, you need to set the "sticky bit" on the binary. Normally after compiling, you might see: # ls -l print -rwxr-xr-x 1 mark mark 111 24 Oct 17:32 print Setting the set-uid (sticky) bit can be done using and octal mode, or symbolically (note that you will need "root" privileges in order to change the ...


0

chown root:root name_of_binary chmod 4755 name_of_binary



Top 50 recent answers are included