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The usual approach is to create a wrapper script. Create a script /usr/local/bin/nicer: #!/bin/sh exec ionice -c3 nice /usr/bin/"${0##*/}" "$@" Create symbolic links for each executable that you want to execute through this wrapper, e.g. ln -s nicer /usr/local/bin/myprogram Then when you run myprogram, it will execute the script ...


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All Linux distributions fundamentally run the same software. What distinguishes distributions is mainly the installer, the software installation mechanisms, and that some system components may be recommended or mandatory on a particular distribution (init system, network management, etc.) as well as the selection of packaged software. For the most part, ...


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Open Z:\m\Desktop\PortForward Network Utilities.desktop with your notepad program (gedit e.g.), look for the Exec command and copy it, then try wine "command" You have to point wine directly to the executable binary. Once you get it you can modify the desktop file to run the command with wine (just add "wine" first in the Exec command)


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You should add to your PATH the directory in which the executable is located, without the executable name: PATH=$PATH:/Users/katja/Desktop/MyDocuments/Programms


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The name of the executable is important. If your file is named foo.sh, then executing foo will not work unless there is some other executable named foo. Unlike Windows, Unix does not do implicit file extensions. If the following works: ./foo.sh But this doesn't: foo.sh That means that the file is in your current directory and your current directory ...


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od -tx1 somefile | less lets you browse a binary (well, hexadecimal) dump of the file. That tells you what's in the file, but of course not in a language readable by normal humans. As a rule, binary executables aren't readable by humans. Even scripts are not readable by most humans. Here are a few ways you can get information from executables: file ...


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If we're talking about a command you can run at the shell prompt, there should be a manual page: $ man someprogram If you get back something like No manual entry for foo, you can try GNU info instead: $ info someprogram Not all Unix and Unix-like OSes have GNU info on them, but a lot do, and it often gives more information about a given command than ...


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I would be very surprised if a .desktop file is handled by your shell. You'd be better off hardcoding the full path in the Exec directive. I found the GNOME Desktop Entry Specification which says: The Exec key must contain a command line. A command line consists of an executable program optionally followed by one or more arguments. The executable ...


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You have to likely do that, because your current path (pwd) is not in your search path for executable files. Type this in your console: echo $PATH | tr ':' '\n' Every folder that is printed, is in the search path for executable files (in that order). Now, if you want to run a file from a different directory, you have to supply the full (relative or ...


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In order to run any executable in Linux, you need to mention its full path (in case it is not stored in the $PATH variable). In Linux, . stands for the directory that you are currently in and / is the path separator. So, with ./somecommands.sh, you tell the shell that, please run the executable somecommands.sh which is present in current directory.


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sudo gedit /usr/share/contractor/make_executable.contract Add this content and save: [Contractor Entry] Name=Make executable Icon=name.of.icon.wanted Description=Make a file executable MimeType=inode;application/x-sh;application/x-executable; Exec=gksudo chmod +x %U Should do the trick. But it is possible that in elementaryOS a file that was made ...



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