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1

The Unix/Linux/*BSD kernel has always kept track of working directory. The chdir() and fchdir() system calls have been around for as long as the C language has been around. If you write a C language program and use execve(), it's up to your program to specify the filename argument of execve(). The kernel will find executables in the current working ...


2

Yes, it is possible by setting up the search path appropriately (either containing your working directory explicitly or by containing "./"), but it is good practice to have the "./" in front of the program name. The reason is security: A malware could write an executable file with the name of a commonly used program (say, ls) and the next call to ls will ...


1

Well a quick workaround would be creating an alias. This creation can be added to the .bashrc to have it added during startup.


2

You should better define what is the "other process" and what method it uses to launch a program. In any case, the current working directory is a property of each and every process running so it might be used to locate a program to run. Whether it is safe to implement it that way is questionable.


2

I found the solution based on another Q&A; So based on the file the Code is a 64bit executable and based on uname my system apparently is 32bit, which is different from what I thought.


3

If that isn't working then you can create a .desktop file for your script. It would look something like this: # $Id: vbox-starter.desktop 22 $ [Desktop Entry] Name=Custom Virtualbox Starter GenericName=VBox Comment=VBox Exec=VBoxSDL --startvm virtualmachine Terminal=true Type=Application Icon=Virtualbox Categories=GNOME;GTK;Utility; Note that since your ...


0

Looks like the text editor thinks that any file without an extension is a text file for it to open. Try to rename it, say myscript.sh and see if that works.


28

In a word: binfmt_misc. It's a Linux-specific, non-portable, facility. There are a couple of formats that are recognized by the kernel with built-in logic. Namely, these are the ELF format (for normal binaries) and the shebang convention (for scripts). (thanks to zwol for the following part of the answer). In addition, Linux recognizes a couple of esoteric ...



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