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Or even easier: # setfacl -m u::rx /bin/chmod # chmod +x /bin/chmod # setfacl -b /bin/chmod


1

Well, I was hoping I could reach an answer to this, without grepping through the entire filesystem; but apparently that was impossible - especially since this adding to the PATH it's apparently my doing :) So, first I grepped through the entire root filesystem, making sure not to cross filesystem boundaries (-xdev), and grepping in binary mode (-ao) for ...


0

There is no official and best way on Linux, but you can make your life easier (or at least have it involve with less typing) by copying the script to a directory in your $PATH, e.g. /usr/local/bin if that directory is in your path. Use echo $PATH to see the list of directories the shell searches through to find commands If the script is written in a way ...


2

./ is not a command. It's a directory (current directory). This just means that you run a file ./phpstorm.sh (file named phpstorm.sh that is in the current directory). Every command that you write is first searched in all the directories in $PATH environment variable. This is why, for instance, ls works and you don't have to write /bin/ls. Write echo ...



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