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0

The most intuitive way to implement your wish is to use an alias. Type: alias studio=/opt/android-studio/bin/studio.sh or enter a related alias into .profile or better: what your shell uses as $ENV. Note that you still may need to add /opt/android-studio/bin to your PATH to be able to use the software. The best is to first try out whether it works ...


5

The command you ran created a symbolic link in the current directory. Judging by the prompt, the current directory is your home directory. Creating symbolic links to executable programs in your home directory is not particularly useful. When you type the name of a program, the shell looks for it in the directories listed in the PATH environment variable. To ...


-2

you can also use ELFex Linker, its a pretty cool program i just discovered, its gui and can create static executables from the dynamic executable.


1

Assuming a textbook example shell (for code clarity) that is already running (so the dynamic linker is done), the commands you mention will require the shell to make the following system calls: read: gets the next command in this case gcc fork: two process are needed, we assume the parent has pid 500 and the child for illustration. the parent will call ...


4

Well, the exact sequence may vary, as there might be a shell alias or function that first gets expanded/interpreted before the actual program gets executed, and then differences for a qualified filename (/usr/libexec/foo) versus something that will be looked for through all the directories of the PATH environment variable (just foo). Also, the details of the ...


15

Let's dive for an answer in random glibc repo in github. This version provides a „banner“ at file version.c: https://github.com/lattera/glibc/blob/a2f34833b1042d5d8eeb263b4cf4caaea138c4ad/csu/version.c In same file there is a few interesting points: __libc_print_version the function that provides printing to stdin same text and symbol __libc_main (void) ...


26

That library has a main() function or equivalent entry point, and was compiled in such a way that it is useful both as an executable and as a shared object. Here's one suggestion about how to do this, although it does not work for me. Here's another in an answer to a similar question on S.O, which I'll shamelessly plagiarize, tweak, and add a bit of ...


0

I had the same problem. On Debian 7.8 the fix was to install the lsb package: apt-get install lsb I had to install a similar package (don't remember exactly which) on CentOS.


3

Probably your NTFS volume is mounted with option noexec, which is the default enforced by permissions. See man ntfs-3g for details. You could selectively enable exec option by adding it to fstab. UUID=82440D36440D2F0B /media/federicop/Data ntfs-3g auto,users,permissions,exec 0 0 Run grep /media/federicop/Data /proc/mounts to know mount options actually ...


1

This is hackier than any of the other answers (with the possible exception of the ld-linux.so answer, which is a really clever hack), but may be more adaptable to other problems (especially if you fall into a time vortex and travel back to a Land Before Perl™). For safety, copy /bin/chmod to a safe place: cd cp /bin/chmod . Do echo chmod | cpio -oc ...


4

Run uname -a and also file nhsupserver. Quite possible that you are running ARM architecture but the nhsupserver binary is for x86. UPDATE now you've added both these outputs it is clear that your hardware is armv7l but the nhsupserver binary is compiled for x86 hardware. You need to obtain a version of nhsupserver which has been compiled for your armv7l ...


1

Menu entries or desktop shortcuts are .desktop files. The standard location for the desktop files of applications installed system-wide is $XDG_DATA_DIRS/applications (by default it is set to /usr/local/share/applications and /usr/share/applications) and for the things installed in your home or menu items you created it is $XDG_DATA_HOME/applications ...


4

In XFCE you can drag the icon of your desired application with your mouse to your terminal, you should see the name of the shortcut. This is what I got for Abiword: /usr/share/applications/abiword.desktop Then you can view this file with less /usr/share/applications/abiword.desktop, or just find the executable: grep Exec ...


2

Short answer yes. But if the executable isn't in one of the directories in your $PATH, then you would have to call the executable with the full /path/to/executable.


0

If you don't trust the executable, use readelf -d instead. From the ldd man page: In the usual case, ldd invokes the standard dynamic linker (see ld.so(8)) with the LD_TRACE_LOADED_OBJECTS environment variable set to 1, which causes the linker to display the library dependencies. Be aware, however, that in some circumstances, some versions of ...



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