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10

It's not clear exactly what you want. If you want to use your existing Ethernet port, that won't be an option for many reasons; the most fundamental being that Ethernet requires precise termination and voltage levels, the hardware on the interface (the PHY) is made to deal with that. Ethernet uses strictly +/- 0.85V and 50ohm termination impedance; RS-232 ...


10

ifconfig will output information about your interfaces, including the MAC address: $ ifconfig eth0 eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:11:22:33:44:55 inet addr:10.0.0.1 Bcast:10.0.0.255 Mask:255.0.0.0 UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:289748093 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 ...


8

How about ifplugd? ifplugd is a Linux daemon which will automatically configure your ethernet device when a cable is plugged in and automatically unconfigure it if the cable is pulled. This is useful on laptops with onboard network adapters, since it will only configure the interface when a cable is really connected. (There is also netplugd, but it was ...


8

Yes. By putting network interfaces into promiscuous mode, tcpdump is able to see exactly what is going out (and in) the network interface. tcpdump operates at layer2 +. it can be used to look at Ethernet, FDDI, PPP & SLIP, Token Ring, and any other protocol supported by libpcap, which does all of tcpdump's heavy lifting. Have a look at the ...


6

It's pretty easy. You need to connect PC to notebook. Configure eth0 on PC (set for example ip = 192.168.2.3 and default gateway 192.168.2.2 and dns server to 8.8.8.8). That's all you need to do on PC. On notebook you need to set up the internet connection as usual and configure eth0 with the following way: set ip address to 192.168.2.2, enable net ...


5

Many devices use nonstandard connectors for serial ports. RJ-45 is probably the most common connector used for RS-232 serial after DB-9, but unlike with DB-9, there aren't even de facto standards for the pinout. I'm aware of 4 different RJ-45 RS-232 pinouts, and there are probably others I haven't seen yet. None of this means that people are somehow ...


5

The articles you found are somewhat outdated. There is now an easy method to assign names to network interfaces, through Udev. On Debian and derivatives (including Ubuntu), look out for a file called /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules. This file is created by /lib/udev/rules.d/75-persistent-net-generator.rules with the help of the script ...


5

I have read a similar story from GeNUA. Their workaround was to restart the network driver (OpenBSD). On Linux this would translate to: ifdown eth3 && rmmod bnx2 && modprobe bnx2 && ifup eth3. The core problem was an internal coding problem with pointers on a PAE system in conjunction with the broadcom-driver.


5

cd into /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts. In there, you will find ifcfg-eth0 and ifcfg-eth1. Edit them, and set the ONBOOT line's values to yes and no, respectively. (Or vice versa, if it's eth1 you'd rather come up on boot.) If you have to prevent the kernel from even attempting to touch the Ethernet hardware, you can pound out the eth1 line in ...


5

You can use a bridge interface. You can use brctl from bridge-utils to create a bridge interface. For example, $ brctl addbr br0 $ brctl addif br0 eth0 eth1 $ brctl show bridge name bridge id STP enabled interfaces br0 8000.00004c9f0bd2 no eth0 eth1 ...


5

Each network adapter on linux has a sysctl boolean parameter accept_local (/proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/eth0/accept_local). Try setting it to 0 for all adapters involved (additionally, you may need to modify your routing table to suit your test setup). Also, make sure that rp_filter (/proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/eth0/rp_filter) is enabled (not 0). Reference: ...


4

Here's a modern Linux method: ip -o link show dev eth0 | grep -Po 'ether \K[^ ]*' It's modern in that ifconfig has long been deprecated in favour of ip from the iproute2 package, and that grep has the -P option for perl regular expressions for the zero-width positive look-behind assertion. grep -o is nice for text extraction. sed is traditionally used ...


4

Perhaps the easiest way is to use your netbook - just because you don't have to filter out unrelated traffic later. You can use tcpdump to dump all traffic on your ethernet device. After starting up tcpdump you connect your equipment. After nothing flashes any more you disconnect it and you can look at the dump with wireshark. The dump should contain ...


4

Welcome to Linux. "Root" is an account on your system. When you log in, you can use "root" for the username and then enter the password you specified for root during setup. The root user doesn't have any limitation on privilege and as such can modify any file, run any program, and programs/processes run as root can do anything they want. Thus it's ...


4

Those are network interfaces, not IP addresses. A network interface can have packets from any protocol exchanged on them, including IPv4 or IPv6, in which case they can be given one or more IP addresses. virbr are bridge interfaces. They are virtual in that there's no network interface card associated to them. Their role is to act like a real bridge or ...


4

Bonsi Scott mentioned wireshark, which will allow you to observe ethernet packets, and all the protocol headers going up. It has a nice GUI interface too (the console version is 'tshark'). Wireshark is build on libpcap, which is fairly well documented and easy to use if you are into programming. Libpcap is also the basis of tcpdump which is similiar in ...


4

One method for configuring multiple NIC cards is through the use of what's called bonding. It goes by other names as well: Bonding Channel Bonding Link Aggregation Using NetworkManager What version of NetworkManager are you using? Version 0.9.8 is the first that purports to offer support for network bonding. excerpt from phoronix.com Add a ...


3

It might be simpler to start by attaching the device directly to the netbook and running tcpdump on the netbook Ethernet NIC. You might need a crossed Ethernet cable for this. If the netbook has no Ethernet NIC, then the next simplest thing to do would be to use a USB/Ethernet NIC on the netbook to connect directly to the device. If for some reason neither ...


3

EDITED after having found the update script. The OUI list is compiled into the Netdiscover binary, so you'll have to recompile it to update the list. You can download the source from the Netdiscover site, but the releases (up through 0.3beta6) are very old (circa 2007), so download a snapshot. The list itself is stored in src/oui.h in the Netdiscover ...


3

I have the same network hardware in my laptop running Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick. For the wireless adapter, you need the binary Broadcom STA proprietary drivers. Ubuntu should prompt you to install them when you first start, but if you're lacking a network connection, that might be why it's not working. Fortunately, the stuff you need is on the 10.10 ...


3

You could find an example in /usr/share/doc*/initscript*, can't remember the exact name, but I'll provide a comprehensive example here: All fields are fairly easy to understand DEVICE=eth0 BOOTPROTO=none ONBOOT=yes NETWORK=10.0.1.0 NETMASK=255.255.255.0 IPADDR=10.0.1.27 Docs here


3

In my situation, I changed the network adapter configuration of my hypervisor after the installation of CentOS. What happened in this case is that the old interface eth0 no longer existed but a new one called eth1 did. ls /sys/class/net eth1 lo I changed the network config /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 to use DEVICE=eth1 and it worked again.


3

Most Linux distributions include the config parameters used to compile the kernel in /boot/config-<kernel-version>. So grep -x 'CONFIG_PACKET=[ym]' "/boot/config-$(uname -r)" Should tell you if AF_PACKET socket support is included (m for as a module). Otherwise, you can just try and create a socket (using socket(2), see packet(7) for how to do it) ...


3

First Issue You're missing the kernel-headers package. You need these to compile kernel modules. yum install kernel-headers Assuming this where you downloaded the drivers from. When I unpacked them on a CentOS 6.4 system I got the following error: $ cd jmebp-1.0.8.5 $ ls CHANGELOG jme.c jme.h Makefile scripts $ make make: *** ...


3

This is impossible, unfortunately. All USB connections must be between a host device (e.g. a computer) and a normal USB device (mouse, etc.). Desktops and laptops are always hosts and therefore cannot connect to each other. Some newer mobile devices implement the USB On-The-Go standard, and can switch between being hosts and normal devices, but this won't be ...


3

If you trust the local machine not to be spoofing, both ifconfig and ip addr will give you the MAC address of the hardware. If you don't trust the local machine, neither ethtool, ifconfig, nor ip is going to provide you the information you need. Because there are very legitimate reasons for MAC spoofing (for example, hot-fail on ethercards) all the drivers ...


3

You could add a dummy interface called eth0 — it wouldn't be exactly the same as lo, but should work: # ip link add eth0 type dummy # ip addr add 169.254.47.11/24 dev eth0 scope link # ip link set dev eth0 up Edit: Corrected the scope for (link-local address) 169.254.xx.yy.


2

You can do that, but it won't do what you want. Due to an esoteric requirement of the 802.11ad standard that requires packets sent to the same host over the trunk to arrive in the same order they were sent in, the kernel can not load balance packets to the same host over multiple links -- it can only send packets to some hosts over one link, and packets to ...


2

Based on comments, it looks like you are using the wrong printer driver. Your are printing to a Belkin F5L049au print server, but you are trying to talk to it as if it understood the custom Brother language. The print server is doing some magic to convert your documents to print over USB to whatever device you have connected. You could probably fix this ...


2

The application you are looking for is macof which is part of the dsniff toolkit. You'll find that ettercap is also quite useful when doing any sort of network auditing on a switched network. Warning: I'm a firm believer that you need to understand the threat to defend against it, but you best be using these tools in your own lab on your own equipment. If ...



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