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1

As said by the xterm(1) man page concerning this menu item (see Section VT Fonts), "This allows you to set the font last specified by the Set Font escape sequence (see the document Xterm Control Sequences)". So, until you use such an escape sequence, this menu item is grayed out. Actually it remains grayed out, but this may be a bug. To try: xterm -xrm ...


2

To answer the question of how to reset it: The xterm escape code OSC 50 ... BEL can be used to set the font (See the answer of @celtschk). Besides setting it to a font name, it can also be set to an index in the font menu you get with Ctrl and right mouse button. We can use this to reset to the default font by using the menu index 0: echo -n "\e]50;#0\a ...


3

Looking at the list of xterm escape codes reveals that (esc)]50;name(bel) sets the xterm's font to the font name, or to an entry in the font menu if the first character of name is a #. The simplest way to reset it is to use the xterm's font menu (Ctrl + right mouse click) and select an entry other than Default. Alternatively, you can find out which font the ...


1

If I understand you correctly, you have a regex pattern in a variable and you would like grep to use it without giving any special meaning to regex metacharacters. If this is the case, the -F (fixed strings) option to grep is what you want: grep -F "$var" your_file Your system may also have a special command (fgrep) that is equivalent to the above: fgrep ...


0

Single-quotes should accomplish what you want. # " is the special charater var='"hello "word";' grep "$var" file From the bash man page: Enclosing characters in single quotes preserves the literal value of each character within the quotes. A single quote may not occur between single quotes, even when preceded by a backslash. Enclosing characters ...


2

These meta characters for --checkpoint-action were introduced in version 1.28, which was released a week ago. A way to get approximate progress status on demand is to check the position of the tar process in its input file. You can see that with lsof -p1234 where 1234 is the PID of the tar process. On Linux, you can check the pos: line of ...


2

$ printf "co\u00ebfficient\n" coƫfficient Or if you want to do the substitution on a stream: perl -CS -pe 's/\\u(....)/chr hex $1/eg'



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