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Either the software image is corrupt, or the hardware is misbehaving. I can't see any obvious cause. This is not the kind of issue that can be debugged over the internet, you're going to need to do your own investigation. The reboots may be due to: buggy hardware; buggy software (probably in the kernel, or at least compounded by a kernel bug) that results ...


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Probably yes and no. Yes, you can probably download the image (or anything that is running on the system for that matter) - just download the "raw" data /dev/mtdblock*. In most cases you'll get something like a SquashFS image that you'll be able to mount and explore locally. No, you are not going to get the source code in this way, with the exception of ...


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mount -o rw,remount /foo will remount /foo mount point rw. If there is a /foo/bar mount point (whether ro or rw), the mount command will likely fail. If there are /foo/what and /foo/ever directories, those will be rw as well. If your read-only mount point is /foo /bar /baz then mount -o rw,remount /foo will keep other mount points read only.


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I found a way of editing the /etc/fstab config file so that you can create a bind mount: /my/real/dir /to/mount/dir <filesystem> rw,bind 0 0 none - No options associated with mount point (like quotas) rw - The mount point is read and writeable. bind - The mount point is a bound directory filesystem - ext2,ext3,vfat,etc.


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You can try to fsck the filesystems and reboot. The filesystem might have been mounted read only due to errors that were not recoverable in an automatic mode of fsck. Do do that: mount this will show you mounted filesystems and corresponding block devices. Look for the root filesystem i.e.: /dev/sda1 on / type ext4 (rw,noatime,errors=remount-ro,discard) ...


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It clearly says "read only filesystem" many times in the log. That's why you can't remove files even as root.


3

the filesystem you are trying to remove symlink from is probably an initramfs which is loaded on ram at boot, so the one you are modifying is the ram copy of the initial ram disk, which is discarded at shutdown. If you want to modify the ramdisk file, you need additional information. Which bootloader are you using? From which device? Can you access the ...


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On your question 2 (defragmenting memory), quoting from https://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/sysctl/vm.txt : compact_memory Available only when CONFIG_COMPACTION is set. When 1 is written to the file, all zones are compacted such that free memory is available in contiguous blocks where possible. This can be important for example in the ...


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Dropbear calls the getpwnam standard library function to get information about user accounts. On systems with GNU libc (the standard library for non-embedded Linux systems), this function can query several types of databases through the NSS mechanism, including /etc/passwd. Embedded systems may run a variety of libc (uClibc, dietlibc, …), and they tend to ...


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If there is no /etc/passwd, then your embedded system is not running what is usually known as the Linux system, but rather a different operating system which is also based on the Linux kernel. A famous example of an operating system which uses on the Linux kernel but is not Linux is Android. Android doesn't have user accounts (at least not in its basic ...


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The information that df produces comes from the statvfs() system call. If your embedded system does not have the df command installed, perhaps it has one of the common scripting languages, using which you can write a one-liner to access the same system call? python -c 'import os; print os.statvfs("/")' If it doesn't have anything like that installed ...



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