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Navigate to Webadmin -> Domains & Accounts -> Mange Accounts -> edit the account that should receive the root messages -> Account Aliases and add “root” as alias. Note that the account that will receive the root messages should be in the Primary Domain.


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You can make a little shell script which make a md5sum of your several inbox files and compare it to a stored one. When the hash are different it's that you received a new mail, then make the new calculated hash replace the old one. Run it in a cron job and use notify-send from libnotify to warn you. #!/bin/bash MAILBOXES=/your_mailbox_directory while true ...


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Set up a root alias. In Debian jessie the default MTA is Exim, issue dpkg-reconfigure exim4-config to change its configuration. Otherwise refer to man newaliases.


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It's probably that someone is using your SMTP server to send mails because its policies allows it. Do you have dovecot or courier services running on your server?


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Use netstat -tnp to find the process PID that is talking to port 25 on remote servers. Use ps and look at /proc/PID/cmd and /proc/PID/exe . Check the server logs (eg apache error log) for strange output like that of a wget command. Likely a PHP or other CGI has a security hole that needs to be fixed. If this is a shared server possibly someone has a ...


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It looks to me like the ISP relay server is misconfigured. It should probably reject your mail right away. The problem in your config is most likely that postfix isn't authenticating itself to the ISP relay. Set smtp_sasl_auth_enable = yes and reload postfix. Then try sending the mail again. From the postfix doc: smtp_sasl_auth_enable (default: ...


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I did some digging into the mbox format. The short answer appears to be that, while there is no RFC specifying the mbox format, already in the mid 1970s the From+space was being used to separate different mail messages strung together in one text file. There is a mail command in the 1st Edition of Unix from Bell Labs (November 1971), but the source code ...


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You could always set the Barracuda hostname to the IP address of your mail server in /etc/hosts on the new product server instance. It's an ugly hack, but it should work if your host uses standard DNS resolver libraries. Oh, and it will break TLS, too, since there would be a name mismatch with the SSL certificate.


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You can use the virtual_alias_maps [*]: virtual_alias_maps = regexp:/etc/postfix/aliases and fill /etc/postfix/aliases with /t(.*)@mydomain.com/ support@mydomain.com you can of course fine-tune the regex to exactly match your ticketid code (ie. only numbers etc.) or use backreferences. [*] if you don't use any virtual domains in postfix you can also ...


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My advice would be to use + style sub-addresses: support+<ticketid>@mydomain.example. Postfix will deliver those mails as if they were send to support@mydomain.example, ignoring the sub-address. Postfix also allows to define a different character to be used. Set the recipient_delimiter parameter in your /etc/postfix/main.cf to the desired values: ...


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If I understand your question correctly, you have a separate host which is sending mail (via SSMTP) and you are worried that this might affect the spam rating of mails from your domain. Most things in emails are easily forged. Programs sending mail rely on this quite frequently, so the mismatch between sender name and authenticated user is quite frequent. ...


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It appears the problem went away by itself after I reinstalled the ssmtp package. I also modified the following line in /etc/munin/munin.conf so to include the full path to the mail binary: contact.example.command /bin/mail -s "Munin alert" me@example.com


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You must have your reverse and forward zones separate from each other at all times. Example forward zone, zone "angelsofclockwork.net" $ORIGIN angelsofclockwork.net. $TTL 86400 @ IN SOA angelsofclockwork.net. palaceredirect.angelsofclockwork.net. ( 410 3H 15M ...


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You might want to consider nmh, a set of programs for messing with mail. As each function is a separate command, you can mix and match, and combine them with any old Unix command/filter. Never forget the venerable mail and Mail programs...



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