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If you install emacs24 explicitly, you should then be able to M-x package-install: sudo aptitude install emacs24 On Wheezy (Debian 7), the simplest option to install Emacs 24 is to enable backports: sudo mkdir -p /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ echo deb http://http.debian.net/debian wheezy-backports main | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/wheezy-backports.list ...


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Emacs is a text editor, Word's .docx is a binary format for a text processing system. Sure, it would be nice if emacs used Word's keyboard shortcuts (or, even much better, the other way around). Alas, it isn't meant to be. You could redefine emacs' keyboard to simulate Word...


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You can use the built-in auto-insert-mode. Add the following to your .emacs file: (auto-insert-mode) (setq auto-insert-directory "~/.emacs.d/templates/") ;; trailing slash IMPORTANT (define-auto-insert "\.py" "python-template.py") and then put the template content in python-template.py in the directory ~/.emacs.d/templates/. If you don't want to be ...


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This is an old question, but I recently had the same problem, so I'll post my solution anyway. In my case the file was encrypted using a GnuPG key. At one point in a long-lived session, Emacs lost the ability to decrypt the file giving me the same error message as as in the original post: epa-file--find-file-not-found-function: Opening input file: ...


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I'm absolutely new to emacs but I can suggest the following: M-b to move backward over a word M-d to kill up to the end of the word Now you can write a new word. Works almost like cw in vim



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