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1

You want to modify a buffer whose disk file has changed since you last read it in or saved it with this buffer. This means that someone, somewhere, changed the file you are currently active with before you saved your chances, graphically it would be like this: — Current file on Disk / File-orig — \ — ...


1

You can stop the server by running server-force-delete, e.g. interactively by doing M-x server-force-delete.


3

The command to do that from inside emacs is M-x server-mode The first time you run it, it'll restart the server it's running. The second time, it'll stop the server. To make sure that you're stopping the server, pass a non-positive prefix argument: M-0 M-x server-mode RET


1

Emacs is an text editor, so the typical use case is to use Emacs to edit the HTML files, and not render them. Use a browser to render them. Modern web pages are so complex that it is nontrivial to write a fully correct renderer, so you would most likely be disappointed even with w3.


3

I think you will get what you want with w3 (http://elpa.gnu.org/packages/w3.html). It's an emacs web browser in lisp. It still looks like a web-page rendered in emacs...


1

vipe uses temporary files (for me in /tmp) to pass and receive the pipe contents to / from Vim. Because of the pipeline, previous vipe invocations cannot be re-edited anymore; they've already been re-read by vipe and sent along the pipeline. So, it should be sufficient to save the previous vipe temp file (as the original one is removed by vipe), and re-open ...


0

This worked: (set-face-attribute 'fringe nil :background "#2E2920" :foreground "#2E2920") #2E2920 being my background color.


1

\222 in the CP-1252 character encoding is ’, i.e. U+2019 RIGHT SINGLE QUOTATION MARK in Unicode. To instruct Emacs that the file is in the CP-1252 encoding, run C-x RET r (revert-buffer-with-coding-system) and select cp1252. To then save the file in UTF-8 (the de facto standard encoding on Linux and other unix systems), run C-x RET f ...


3

As in the page you linked: In line mode, Term basically acts like Shell mode (see Shell Mode). In char mode, each character is sent directly to the subshell, except for the Term escape character, normally C-c. In line mode, it reads an entire line and permits various emacs editing operations on it, then sends it to the process all at once when you're ...


3

In this context, an "instance of Emacs" refers to a single process. No, Emacs doesn't hold a thread for each open buffer. My current session has 129 open buffers (some 100 opened from files, the others being output buffers for certain subordinate processes - python, ruby, elixir interpreters, wanderlust folder and summary views, flycheck-mode syntax ...


1

You can enable it through the customize interface. Press M-x customize-variable Enter horizontal-scroll-bar-mode Click Value Menu, choose t to enable horizontal scroll bars. Click Apply and Save.


3

Short answer It provides number 0 to the next command. Long answer C-u in emacs called universal-argument. It's begin a numeric argument for the following command. Digits or minus sign following C-u make up the numeric argument. You can read more details about C-u by typing C-h k C-u or read online documentation here. Understanding meaning of C-u, now ...


0

I solved this problem by modifying org/lisp/org-footnote.el Comment out a line in definition of 'org-footnote-re' (defconst org-footnote-re ;; Only [1]-like footnotes are closed in this regexp, as footnotes ;; from other types might contain square brackets (i.e. links) in ;; their definition. ;; ;; `org-re' is used for regexp compatibility with XEmacs. ...


2

I have a few ways to do this, easy ones first: Making the install prefix flexible is hard - I would just make the install prefix to your home directory, or somewhere that you can access on any of the machines, and use make install DESTDIR=/path/to/place/where/binaries/should/be/installed to install them to somewhere other than the prefix. I personally have ...


2

You can just define the linum size in your init config so it doesnt depend on default-face: (set-face-attribute 'linum nil :height 100)


0

EMACS will convert multiple slashes to a root path, e.g. // becomes / If you were to leave whatever text is in the minibuffer append a / paste the absolute path in the minibuffer, appending it to existing text The minibuffer will have a path such as ~//path2file/file EMACS will open /path2file/file There's no need to reassign Ctrl+K, just learn how ...


0

This have bothered me in the past as well. The solution I found was to make Ctrl+K a delete only command. This worked for me, as I never used Ctrl+K to copy and paste. Originally posted here ;; Ctrl-K with no kill (defun delete-line-no-kill () (interactive) (delete-region (point) (save-excursion (move-end-of-line 1) (point))) (delete-char 1) ...



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