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11

After a day of research, I can now answer my own Question: yes it is possible, and you can even use that partition as /boot and store your kernels/initramfs/etc. there. Requirements: Grub >= 2.00 (1.98 and 1.99 do not work) Grub must be installed from a Linux kernel, that has support for EFI variables (CONFIG_EFI_VARS compiled in or as module efivars) For ...


8

EDIT: When I wrote this answer very few distributions shipped with an EFI_STUB configured kernel so one had to build a custom one. Nowadays most distributions ship a suitably configured kernel and a custom build is not required any longer. In this case the sections “Set up your partitions” and “Setting things up” are the interesting ones, “Requirements” and ...


8

QEMU's -kernel, -boot, and -initrd are BIOS only. They are completely incompatible with EFI (currently). Update: OVMF supports -boot since r13683, and supports -kernel -append -initrd since r13923. Download OVMF-0.1+r14071-1.1.x86_64.rpm or newer version. Extract bios.bin from the rpm: rpm2cpio OVMF-0.1+r14071-1.1.x86_64.rpm | cpio -idmv Specify firmware ...


6

The problem was simply that the efivars kernel module was not loaded. This can be confirmed by: sh-4.2# efivar-tester UEFI variables are not supported on this machine. If you are chrooted in to your new install, exit out, and then enable efivars: exit modprobe efivars ...and then chroot back in. In my case, this means: chroot /mnt but you should ...


5

Just drop this binary into that flash drive FAT's root directory under the name of shellx64.efi, or get yourself a copy of refind usbflash image which would also serve as a decent boot manager.


3

I don't know why you're using grub in the first place. UEFI acts as a boot loader and it allows to select different operating systems or individual kernels from a boot menu. Although there are some exceptions, it usually is not required to chain a second boot loader, grub in this case. You mention, you installed elementary OS instead of Fedora, which means ...


3

A system can have a UEFI firmware and still boot OS in legacy BIOS mode. In that situation there is no way for the booted OS to determine if the hardware is actually capable of UEFI, because BIOS isn't forward compatible with UEFI. You can still look at firmware interface if anything is related to UEFI, but that is vendor specific and inconsistent. So there ...


2

When you go into the "BIOS" (EFI actually) one of the items in the list of bootable items should be the EFI boot prompt, if it's a UEFI system. This is sometimes called the EFI shell. It's much like an emaciated version of a Unix command prompt. Normally you won't want it in the boot list but it can be useful during initial setup and during troubleshooting. ...


2

I was able to boot Arch from UEFI by using an Archboot image, and then install it on the GPT drive. Then I had to install grub2, which I installed on the same partition as the Microsoft EFI partition, and chainloaded Windows 7 bootloader from it. Thanks!


2

I can heartily recommend the UEFI article series by Rod Smith. In particular, he mentions that "hybrid" GPT-MBR is a "dangerous hack" due to desynchronisation hazards.


2

Make sure that UEFI is not going to lock Linux out of your machine; there is probably a setting to that effect in the BIOS. Check and verify for sure. I would double-check this point with the manual and with the manufacturer if you must. There was some extended discussion about it; ZDNet had several articles. Here is an article from 21 September 2011 and ...


2

Do you have Windows installed on a GPT partition? If I understand you correctly, you are trying something like what I did yesterday I had the same error, it comes up, because with EFI you do not give chainloader a number of sectors to read but the path to the Windows boot file. chainloader /efi/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi Your root should be set to the ...


2

So apparently there are several issues and several approaches to handle this. EFI should be able to handle RAID paritions, but only with metadata <= 1.0 Newer version of metadata are stored on the beginning of the partition (screwing up the filesystem detection). You can go without extra /boot partition if you integrate the /boot into /boot/efi after ...


2

I don't remember if EFI GRUB2 uses LoadImage() (most likely it does by now as the RestrictedBoot story has basically boiled down to "your last-mile bootloader has to or shim will blow it up") -- it will take EFI drivers (like those available with refind) if that's the case; GRUB-specific filesystem drivers are not available to EFI firmware. Your ...


2

Forget grub entirely - it is nothing but a distraction. It isn't even a boot-loader anymore; on EFI systems the bootloader is built-in to the firmware. grub is just a boot-manager in that context - and almost definitely entirely redundant. What's more - it is probably the grub install that broke everything in the first place. These are the things you need: ...


1

Root of the problem was found. While booting with native XEN UEFI intarface xen.efi microkernel does not expose EFI Variables to the Dom0 kernel. As a result, efivars modules is not loaded and not providing any /sys/ entries required for mdadm to assemble IMSM firmware RAID. Patching of the XEN package is required to achieve desired results.


1

rEFInd can chainload grub. Install it to a vFAT partition and let rEFInd auto-detect your MBR.


1

Just to share, this is what I have done: There is no need to perform grub-install since all the files are already there. What needs to be done subsequently is to create a new boot option at the partition sda1 using the EFI boot manager and pointing to the shim.efi bootloader: # efibootmgr -c -L Fedora -l \\EFI\\fedora\\shim.efi Then check its boot ...


1

Use grub-install (most probably with no additional arguments) to add the new record; test that it's bootable; use efibootmgr -B to remove the old record (run with no args first to find the bootnum); Rod Smith's articles are much recommended. Shameful plug: you might find my rescue image helpful in case something goes wrong.


1

I got it up and running now. Originally, I wanted to use the EFI Stub way to boot it but I felt it wasted too much of my time. So I went ahead and re-installed Grub2 EFI in chroot using Mint 16 live USB (UEFI mode). /dev/sda4 is where my Debian installation resides and /dev/sda1 is my EFS partition. (mint)$ sudo mount /dev/sda4 /mnt (mint)$ sudo mount ...


1

Boot using a livecd or rescue image. Examine your partition table and make note of what your root partition for each of arch and Debian is. Reinstall grub2 EFI and setup menu entries for both arch and Debian (using boot/root/kernel info you either know or can learn using the rescue image). Reboot and see if you did it right. Follow a guide for installing ...


1

I did it ! First of all, I removed all the unnecessary boot entries by: efibootmgr -b <entry_hex_number> -B Then, Reformatting the ESP partition with FAT32 filesystem. mkfs.vfat -F32 /dev/sda1 Then installed grub to /dev/sda NOT /dev/sda1 grub-install /dev/sda


1

I am not that familiar with SUSE but i think that the boot partition always has to be outside lvm. the kernel loads the lvm module and then can access the lvm-disks but not before. so you need a 500MB /boot partition outside lvm that can hold the kernel image. As far as i read you need a special bootmanager to be able to boot form EFI: I am not sure if ...


1

You might want to install refind somewhere, I doubt centos6's grub was ever intended to do that.


1

Suggested reading: Rod's books on the topic (don't worry, it's concise with good brief-to-readable ratio). Other than that, try running efibootmgr in any EFI-booted Linux distribution.(I'd suggest ALT Linux based rescue of my make as a shameless plug though) If it does include a numbered line for Fedora then maybe it's a question to HP support regarding ...


1

What do you want from that LiveCD? Maybe a DVD that boots for you is fine for that if it lends you a shell (try Ctrl-Alt-F2/F3/...) and provides the tools needed. Try getting to the console, chrooting into the system installed (but lacking the bootloader) and running grub-install (with no additional arguments) by hand to see the error message. Did you ...


1

Try to reinstall grub. Plug in you USB dongle with Mint on it and run a Live Session. Open the console and type sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt sudo grub-install --root-directory=/mnt/ /dev/sda Then reboot and look if it works.


1

Yes, you're not in EFI mode then as noted already; yes, you need to get there to be able to set it up (quite cumbersome chicken-and-egg but still you can do it with UEFI-bootable media; that will not need CSM/"legacy BIOS" enabled). I'd suggest getting through Rod Smith's excellent pages on the topic which very well might save you quite some time; not sure ...


1

I think I've found the answer: I believe it is Windows boot code. Based on the readable ASCII in the hexdump ("Invalid partition table.Error loading operating system.Missing operating system.") I was able to do a Google search and found a site which discussed windows bootloaders. The hexdump of mine matches the Windows 7 bootloader detailed at ...


1

Not a direct answer but as there are none you might be interested in this xorriso bugreport -- I'm going to comment there too but in short, xorriso-1.2.4 with the upstream revision 1044 works fine for me and my hardware stand with exactly this script (it's a Russian spoken wiki but the script part should be legible enough; pay attention to efiboot.img). ...



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