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Here is the solution from the link I posted in my comment. This comes from here, which references this superuser post. Create .ssh folder in /home for the keys to be stored sudo mkdir /home/.ssh Move existing authorized_keys file into .ssh dir as username sudo mv ~/.ssh/authorized_keys /home/.ssh/username Create symbolic link to authorized_keys file ...


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If you fiddled with your home directory, you needed root to get at the /home directory that contains it. Possibly your home now contains some stuff owned by something other than you, that the sudo obviates. An aggressive approach might be "sudo chown -R myname:users ~myname" A more cautious person might do "find ~myname ! -user myname" to look for such ...


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If you didn't have an initramfs, you could do it with kernel parameters. Just add a random string as kernel parameter and then use /proc/cmdline as the key for your encryption. If it's not easy to add such parameters to your boot loader, the Linux kernel has a CMDLINE config option that lets you compile it in. (Note: it is possible for kernel parameters to ...



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