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Not possible. Someone, or something has to supply the password for decryption. Obviously it can't be on your home directory (as that is encrypted). It should not be on your hard disk at all, as that would be pointless: An attacker could extract it from there. So I don't see a way to make this automated (i.e, not requiring you) while preserving that only ...


2

Here is the solution from the link I posted in my comment. This comes from here, which references this superuser post. Create .ssh folder in /home for the keys to be stored sudo mkdir /home/.ssh Move existing authorized_keys file into .ssh dir as username sudo mv ~/.ssh/authorized_keys /home/.ssh/username Create symbolic link to authorized_keys file ...


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If you fiddled with your home directory, you needed root to get at the /home directory that contains it. Possibly your home now contains some stuff owned by something other than you, that the sudo obviates. An aggressive approach might be "sudo chown -R myname:users ~myname" A more cautious person might do "find ~myname ! -user myname" to look for such ...


1

If you didn't have an initramfs, you could do it with kernel parameters. Just add a random string as kernel parameter and then use /proc/cmdline as the key for your encryption. If it's not easy to add such parameters to your boot loader, the Linux kernel has a CMDLINE config option that lets you compile it in. (Note: it is possible for kernel parameters to ...



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