Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

2

Here is the solution from the link I posted in my comment. This comes from here, which references this superuser post. Create .ssh folder in /home for the keys to be stored sudo mkdir /home/.ssh Move existing authorized_keys file into .ssh dir as username sudo mv ~/.ssh/authorized_keys /home/.ssh/username Create symbolic link to authorized_keys file ...


1

It is possible to generate an fstab entry as described here: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/ECryptfs#Auto-mounting_2 Using the mount command one can get the correct mount options and add this to the fstab file /path/to/encrypted/dir /path/to/decrypted/dir ecryptfs ...


1

Install the ecryptfs package. Run the command ecryptfs-mount-private. It will prompt you for a password, enter the password for your account on Mint. Installing the package also adds pam_ecryptfs to the PAM configuration, so from now on, if you use the same password for your account and for your ecryptfs passphrase, your encrypted home directory will be ...


1

If you fiddled with your home directory, you needed root to get at the /home directory that contains it. Possibly your home now contains some stuff owned by something other than you, that the sudo obviates. An aggressive approach might be "sudo chown -R myname:users ~myname" A more cautious person might do "find ~myname ! -user myname" to look for such ...


1

If you didn't have an initramfs, you could do it with kernel parameters. Just add a random string as kernel parameter and then use /proc/cmdline as the key for your encryption. If it's not easy to add such parameters to your boot loader, the Linux kernel has a CMDLINE config option that lets you compile it in. (Note: it is possible for kernel parameters to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible