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11

As mentioned by @Kusalananda, usually upgrades are done by removing the old file, and creating a new one with the same name. This will actually create a new file with a new inode, leaving the system free to use the old one as long as it is open. As a simplified example, stuff like rm /bin/cat cp /new/version/of/cat /bin/cat will create a logically new ...


3

Files won't be "properly deleted" if they are unlinked while they are still opened. When they are closed, the disk space that they used will be considered "free" again. This goes for currently running applications and their shared libraries as well. The only thing that I could see failing would be if a program used dlopen() to load a shared library on ...


1

These answers are all pretty bad so I thought I'd jump in here. shared libraries should be versioned according to the following scheme: blah.so.X.Y.Z where X = backwards incompatible ABI release where Y = backwards compatible ABI release where Z = Internal changes only - no change to the ABI Typically you only see the first digit like 'hello.so.1' ...



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