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14

In short, yes, this is possible. The relevant search string you are looking for is "Multi-seat X". The Ubuntu wiki, Gentoo wiki, Debian wiki and Arch wiki all have articles related to multi-seat X. A number of other articles can be found on the Xorg wiki page on multiseat and even more can be found on google. From what I can tell from these articles, ...


11

This was tested on a laptop with a i915 drived graphic card. Definitively, in my config/install, there are not. :-( When a new screen is plugged, no event is sent to the host! (This stay true after my last edit!) So the only way is to use pooling... Trying to make them lighter as possible... Last Edit : Finaly there is one better solution (through acpi):...


11

To move it to a different monitor, right click on an empty area, select "Properties" and then uncheck the 'Expand' box. Now left click on the end one of the ends and drag it to a different monitor. Right click again on the end (making sure not to hit any other widget in the panel) and click on Expand again.


10

Your desktop environment probably has a way, but you don't say which one you're using (if any). If your display driver is compatible with the XRandR extension, which is the standard X.org method for managing display resolutions and arrangements, you can use the command-line utility xrandr. I think the proprietary NVidia driver bypasses XRandR, so if you're ...


10

This is now possible (UPDATE #2) Cinnamon now has this functionnality. To save you the trouble of reading this long answer, you can directly go to nedim's Unfortunately Cinnamon does not appear to have this functionality, (yet?). It only shows a panel on your primary monitor. There are several issues on the project's Github page that are requesting it. ...


10

With MATE, you can create new panels and drag them to the second monitor (to enable drag, uncheck "Expand" in the properties, also uncheck "Autohide and "Show hide buttons"). Then, if you add a "Window List" on each display, it will manage each display's windows separately. This is very nice except that the Workspace Switcher still operates on both ...


9

In Cinnamon 2.6 and later you can have additional panels in any monitor without installing additional software. Just right-click the panel, click on Modify panel ... and then on Add panel. The top and bottom edges of all monitors should get highlighted and a new panel will be set up where you click. It works perfectly. Here is a github post from when it was ...


9

The UltraVideo device If you look at the specs for that particular device it doesn't support Linux. Features Support Windows XP,Vista, Winodws 7,Windows 8, windows 8.1, Mac OS up to 10.9.4 (**Does NOT support XP 64bit and Windows Server**) System Requirements Does NOT support XP 64bit and Windows Server/Linux Other compatible devices? ...


8

Short answer: yes, you can do this. I have my (Fedora) desktop set up this way, each monitor is an independent display. It is the same 'desktop', in the X sense, but there are some limitations to typical desktop functionality with this setup versus the 'single desktop spread over two monitors' configuration. [For example, you can't drag a window from one ...


7

There is a really simple way to do this using the awful extension pack. Some distros bundle this automatically, others have it as a sub-package. Once you have it,you can simply use the built in awful.client.movetoscreen. For example I have a binding that looks like this: awful.key({modkey}, "o", awful.client.movetoscreen) This means with one keystroke I ...


7

The panel appears on the primary monitor. You have not said how you are setting your system up so I can't give you a very detailed answer. You will need to use xrandr to find out you current setup. In my case this is: $ xrandr | grep -w connected VGA-0 connected 1440x900+1600+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 408mm x 255mm DP-3 connected 1600x900+...


6

Right now I am answering this with my notebook connected to a monitor. To have my desktop extended I use xrandr and its graphical interface ARandR, both of them working pretty well. Indeed I have a script, which I execute everytime I log to my notebook having the screen attached to it: #!/bin/sh xrandr --output LVDS1 --mode 1280x800 --pos 0x0 --rotate ...


6

You could try using the tool monitor-edid, which produces output like this Name: DELL 2407WFP EISA ID: DELa017 EDID version: 1.3 EDID extension blocks: 0 Screen size: 52.0 cm x 33.0 cm (24.25 inches, aspect ratio 16/10 = 1.60) Gamma: 2.2 Digital signal Max video bandwidth: 170 MHz HorizSync 30-83 VertRefresh 56-76 # Monitor preferred modeline (...


5

Here is a small utility program that does what you want: https://github.com/zoltanp/xrandr-invert-colors


5

This is heavily dependent on the set up of the system. One way to get the information would be if xrandr is being used: xrandr --query This will display something like: Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 3046 x 1050, maximum 8192 x 8192 VGA1 connected 1680x1050+1366+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 473mm x 296mm 1680x1050 60.0*+ ...


5

Having a single Thunderbolt port does not mean that you can connect only one Thunderbolt display. Thunderbolt can be daisy-chained. Multiple displays are possible via a single Thunderbolt port. I do not know whether Linux supports daisy-chained Thunderbolt displays. And of course I do not know whether Thunderbolt daisy-chaining is an option for you, as far ...


4

This depends on the version of awesome you're using: awesome 1.x Set the screen variable in the rule: { rule = { class = "URxvt" }, properties = { tag = tags[1][1] }, screen = 1 } awesome 2.x Set the screen property on the client in the hook_manage function: if c.class == "URxvt" then awful.client.movetotag(tags[1][1], c) c.screen =...


4

If I understood your needs you have to bind one screen, keyboard and one mouse to one ServerLayout and the others to the second one. http://cambuca.ldhs.cetuc.puc-rio.br/multiuser/ Section "ServerLayout" Identifier "Layout0" Screen 0 "Screen0" InputDevice "Mouse0" "CorePointer" InputDevice "Keyboard0" "CoreKeyboard" EndSection Section "...


4

You need to setup the two input devices manually in xorg.conf and specify the offset for each one so that they map to the correct location in your overall X screen setup. Each input driver will need to be specifically mapped by to the ID of the device it corresponds to. Not specifying this will cause the driver to take over ANY matching devices. After you ...


4

One could try fiddling with negative gamma-values and brightness-values < 1 to generate a negative gamma-ramp on a specific output. xrandr --output [output] --gamma -0.5:-0.5:-0.5 --brightness 0.1 this suffices at least to me and works out of the box, but does not take into account any existing gamma-curves for an output. might be worth a shot. ...


4

Devil's Pie probably does the job, it can be configured to detect windows as they are created, and match the window to a set of rules. If the window matches the rules, it can perform a series of actions on that window. The last news entry there is 5 years old, but it's probably ok (based on EWMH, Extended Window Manager Hints). (Regarding automated ...


4

If the two monitors are using the nvidia cards # nvidia-xconfig -a as root would: -a, --enable-all-gpus Configure an X screen on every GPU in the system. nvidia-xconfig man page. edit: Assuming you are using nvidia's driver and not nouveau.


4

Try this extension: Panel Span. You might have to edit metadata.json, to add your particular Cinnamon version { "cinnamon-version": [ "1.4.0", "1.4.1", "1.4.2" ]. Screenshot     


3

Try xcalib -d :0 -invert -alter The -d option refers to the device, and it worked for me when -s didn't


3

xrandr only works on newer X servers with the RandR extension. Granted, that should be true of everything these days, but in case not… xdpyinfo also prints out per-screen information, including dimension (pixel and physical size).


3

Have you tried something like MDM? It looks like it can handle the keyboard/video/mouse mappings in its config file.


3

Often your monitor setup can be found in the Xorg configuration file /etc/X11/xorg.conf. However, many modern distributions (such as recent Ubuntu releases) try to avoid using a configuration file, since maintaining it can be a pain. You can create this file initially by running: # Xorg --configure From there you can make further customizations. The ...


3

One interesting possibility I forgot is what Tyler Szabo's answer to my question Multiseat gaming? @gaming.SE suggests: I would use VMWare. This might be possible with just VMWare player (you will need to be able to allocate a mouse to a single VM), or you might need to try VMWare workstation (for which I'm quite sure it works). The hardware/software you ...


3

This is probably because you change X to dual-monitor setup after you started the window manager (this also depends on the WM, but it looks like openbox has a problem here). To solve this, you should start dual-monitor before starting openbox. If you use startx (or an entry like my custom Xinit script at the DM) to start the desktop environment, you can put ...


3

It's been years since I last saw a graphics card that wasn't properly supported on Linux, and quite a while since I last saw a single-framebuffer card. The two biggest off-board chipsets, nVidia and AMD (ex ATI) both offer well-supported multi-screen configurations for X11 on Linux (closed-source binary drivers may be needed to enable all features on some ...



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